I dislike Apple.

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    Oct 26, 2013 4:07 AM GMT
    I just wanted to vent, I am really not liking Apple right now. I spent 6 months making an app only to have them tell me it violated their TOS, despite having told me in a previous email 7 months ago that the app would be OK. FUCK YOU APPLE.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:09 AM GMT
    Please describe your app.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:22 AM GMT
    I created a gaydar app based on a scientific study done in 2011. I knew it could be a sensitive app, so I emailed them before hand. They told me it would be ok. To make matters worse I deleted the email exchange about 2 months ago.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:22 AM GMT
    im loving mac again, I just updated to everything Mac and I can't believe I was ever so silly enough to revert back to windows.

    Just waiting on my new iPad and Im all set yay for me!
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:24 AM GMT
    I agree, I use a mac virtual environment on my windows laptop.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:40 AM GMT
    When you are building a "sensitive" app you have to also be prepared to be banned at any moment, even post approval. Just because yesterday Apple told you that your app was ok does not mean that tomorrow enough people wont complain about similar apps to the point that Apple has to reconsider their review process.

    I can see how a "gaydar" app can be misused to bully gays and lesbians, especially in highschool. So dont be too surprised if this type of app gets re-evaluated given enough complains from other users that might not deem the content necessary enough to out-weight the many problems it generates. While you're complaining because Apple banned your app, many others appreciate that Apple listens.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:40 AM GMT
    Now's your chance to learn java and redo it for Android. The Android development environment comes with an Android emulator that literally boots an Android image; you can boot any version of Android that you'd like to test your app on, and specify the screen size. That's on Windows; I don't know what it's like on Linux or the Mac.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:45 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidNow's your chance to learn java and redo it for Android. The Android development environment comes with an Android emulator that literally boots an Android image; you can boot any version of Android that you'd like to test your app on, and specify the screen size. That's on Windows; I don't know what it's like on Linux or the Mac.



    Android development on Mac is the same as in Windows for the most part. However, he is better off with HTML5/Javascript, which is completely platform independent. He also has to consider that the money to be made off Android development is considerably less than what developers can make off iOS. Android development is far more expensive due to the high fragmentation of their ecosystem. Google itself makes more money off iOS than Android, and so does Facebook.
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:50 AM GMT
    I'm already close to completing an Android version. But I don't know HTML 5. I'd have to learn it...icon_neutral.gif
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    Oct 26, 2013 4:56 AM GMT
    Just create another Apple developer account and submit the app. I bet it will get approved. Really, there's no rhyme or reason to Apple's app approval process. It all seems random.
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    Oct 26, 2013 6:23 AM GMT
    AtlasHarper saidI'm already close to completing an Android version. But I don't know HTML 5. I'd have to learn it...icon_neutral.gif


    Android can be annoying to develop for without a decent amount of test units. Their emulators are helpful but sometimes it just doesnt cut it. I had plenty of issues with Nexus 4 smartphone and Nexus 10 tablet even after all tests with the emulator passed just fine. I say pick the most popular Android devices and focus your testing on those for now.

    HTML5/Javascript is a mix of HTML and Hardware Access API through HTML/Javascript and by using a third party wrapper like Phonegap. Performance aint the greatest and there is only so much you can do with it but it is getting there. If you are serious about mobile development you should definitely dedicate sometime to learning how to develop web apps. These will be deployable to literally any platform with almost 0 effort.
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    Oct 26, 2013 8:49 PM GMT
    I'm going to repurpose the app and then resubmit it. And I'm going to target the most popular screen sizes on Android devices. Handling different screen sizes is the most difficult part for me because it feels like A LOT of work to do solo.
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    Oct 26, 2013 9:05 PM GMT
    charlitos saidIf you are serious about mobile development you should definitely dedicate some time to learning how to develop web apps. These will be deployable to literally any platform with almost 0 effort.

    But then he has to factor in the cost of paying the service provider for the web server. Other than that I agree 1000%. I haven't looked at it recently but one that I liked was Google App Engine. It's free for something like half a million hits per day. Back when I was playing with it they only had their Big Table database, which isn't sql. I think they may have an sql database now. What was impressive about it is that if your app starts getting a lot of traffic it automatically parallelizes / scales out for you. And you don't have to do any system administration.
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    Oct 27, 2013 2:46 AM GMT
    AtlasHarper saidI'm going to repurpose the app and then resubmit it. And I'm going to target the most popular screen sizes on Android devices. Handling different screen sizes is the most difficult part for me because it feels like A LOT of work to do solo.
    If you follow the Android developer guidelines, it shouldn't be a lot of work to develop for different screen sizes. Everything scales. Also, you don't have to develop/submit two different apps; one for phones and one for tablets.
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    Oct 27, 2013 4:33 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    AtlasHarper saidI'm going to repurpose the app and then resubmit it. And I'm going to target the most popular screen sizes on Android devices. Handling different screen sizes is the most difficult part for me because it feels like A LOT of work to do solo.
    If you follow the Android developer guidelines, it shouldn't be a lot of work to develop for different screen sizes. Everything scales. Also, you don't have to develop/submit two different apps; one for phones and one for tablets.


    I guess I'm a perfectionist. I want my app to look near pixel perfect so most things are hard coded. I know that means some devices will be left out, but only if said device carries a resolution used in less than 1% of devices. And over time, future updates could carry those devices.
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    Oct 27, 2013 6:58 PM GMT
    AtlasHarper saidI want my app to look near pixel perfect so most things are hard coded.

    As an old timer that seems like a bad tactic to me. There's an old adage that in the lifetime of an app 20% of the software development and support is spent on the initial development and the other 80% is spent on supporting it (fixing, updating, tweaking) after it's released. By hard coding things you're making that support work that much more difficult. Better to do like xrichx said and follow the Android guidelines so that your app is more easily screen resolution and hardware independent. That will make its transition to newer versions of Android easier.
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    Oct 29, 2013 1:29 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    AtlasHarper saidI want my app to look near pixel perfect so most things are hard coded.

    As an old timer that seems like a bad tactic to me. There's an old adage that in the lifetime of an app 20% of the software development and support is spent on the initial development and the other 80% is spent on supporting it (fixing, updating, tweaking) after it's released. By hard coding things you're making that support work that much more difficult. Better to do like xrichx said and follow the Android guidelines so that your app is more easily screen resolution and hardware independent. That will make its transition to newer versions of Android easier.


    True, I'm more concerned with images in the program getting stretched or contracted based on screen resolutions. To be honest, I never even considered developing for Android until the rejection notice. So now I am having to backtrack and redesign the app to scale using percentages/ratios vs hard coding it for the few resolutions in iOS (Yep, me snubbing droid devices was a mistake). To make it easier on myself, Im writing it in AS3 using Flex. That way I can write it ONCE and then make minor modifications before I port it to iOS and then Android. Plus, I'm tons more familiar with AS3.

    And as far as having the new iOS drain your battery, I feel you on that. I've used mainly jailbroken devices so my battery stays constantly drained anyway.
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    Oct 29, 2013 7:58 PM GMT
    AtlasHarper saidI'm more concerned with images in the program getting stretched or contracted based on screen resolutions.

    If you're worried about the images being resized smaller with a crappy resizing algorithm you can resize them beforehand (with a program that does a better job; e.g., photoshop) and put them in a resources folder that specifies the screen size. As for making it bigger, I'm not sure about that; I suppose you could put a blank border around it and then put it in the appropriate resources screen size folder.

    Although I'm not sure that that's really a problem; I have the Nexus 10 tablet and I can't say that I ever remember seeing something that looked pixelated from being blown up.

    You can also have different screen layouts depending on the screen size and resolution by using the resources folders that specify the size and resolution. That part of Android development is rather nice.
  • FRE0

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    Oct 31, 2013 12:10 AM GMT
    I have an I-Mac that is about 7 years old. Yahoo mail keeps advising me to update my browser (Safari), but I cannot, nor can I prevent the nuisance message from appearing every time I log into Yahoo mail. The new versions of Safari are not compatible with my version of OsX (10.4.11), but Apple does not make a later version available for my computer; they say that it's obsolete. I don't think that I should have to throw away a perfectly good computer just because someone decides that it's obsolete. I've already had to give up on my IBM 360 and IBM 1401 and now Apple is playing the same game.

    Also, Apple uses cutsy animal names for the various versions of OxX; like Snow Leopard, Puma, Roc, Phoenix, Dodo, etc.; whereas applications specify numbers like 11.1.10. Trying to correlate the cutsy names with the numbers is at best confusing.
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    Oct 31, 2013 3:26 PM GMT
    I agree with what that one dumb guy said.
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    Oct 31, 2013 8:19 PM GMT
    FRE0, if it's an option, investigate installing an alternative web browser like Chrome or Firefox. You can still use Safari in addition to the other one as necessary.

    Microsoft is definitely better at supporting older hardware. But switching to Windows would require relearning how to use your computer and possibly replacing any software that you've purchased and so is probably more trouble than it's worth.

    It's not like a car where you can keep driving it forever; because of the internet computers are interacting with and have to be compatible with something that's external to it.
  • FRE0

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    Nov 01, 2013 6:33 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFRE0, if it's an option, investigate installing an alternative web browser like Chrome or Firefox. You can still use Safari in addition to the other one as necessary.

    Microsoft is definitely better at supporting older hardware. But switching to Windows would require relearning how to use your computer and possibly replacing any software that you've purchased and so is probably more trouble than it's worth.

    It's not like a car where you can keep driving it forever; because of the internet computers are interacting with and have to be compatible with something that's external to it.


    Thanks.

    I checked out Firefox, but it also requires an OsX update, so it is out. However, I can check our Chrome.

    At one time I did use Windows, etc., and the change to I-Max was quite easy. Changing back would be easy too. But one reason I switched to Apple was that it seems unnecessary to be constantly fiddling with the computer, such as by running defrag, anti-virus software, etc., and OS crashes are very rare.

    If software were written more carefully, there would be fewer problems.