GLAAD report: TV networks slip in LGBT inclusion

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    Oct 27, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    While no channels received an 'excellent' rating, Fox and ABC Family ranked highest. History and TBS ranked lowest.

    Despite last year's record-setting numbers, depictions of LGBT characters on TV networks has slipped this year, according to the nation's LGBT media advocacy group.

    GLAAD released its seventh "Annual Network Responsibility Index" and its 18th annual "Where We Are on TV" report Friday, and while some networks were praised for their inclusion of gay and lesbian characters, networks as a whole failed to live up to last year's bump.

    This year, 3.3% of scripted series regulars will be LGBT, according to the reports, down from 4.4% last year.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/10/11/glaad-tv-report/2965797/
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    Oct 28, 2013 12:00 AM GMT
    Honestly, I don't like this whole affirmative action mindset. I don't care if a show or a movie has gay characters or a gay plotline. I want the plotline to be GOOD!

    I hardly watch TV anymore, but when I do, I watch it to be entertained and to watch something solid, not based on a particular demographic. If there's going to be a "gay" plot, it had better be well-written! The quality of TV shows has slipped in the past 8-10 years that I don't care about the gayness or lack thereof of the show.

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    Oct 28, 2013 2:04 AM GMT
    libertpaulian saidHonestly, I don't like this whole affirmative action mindset. I don't care if a show or a movie has gay characters or a gay plotline. I want the plotline to be GOOD!

    I hardly watch TV anymore, but when I do, I watch it to be entertained and to watch something solid, not based on a particular demographic. If there's going to be a "gay" plot, it had better be well-written! The quality of TV shows has slipped in the past 8-10 years that I don't care about the gayness or lack thereof of the show.



    Yes, I agree. I find myself watching MeTV quite a bit actually.
  • 1blind_dog

    Posts: 377

    Oct 28, 2013 8:12 AM GMT
    No one wants to compete with Modern Family so they're giving up
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    Oct 28, 2013 9:43 AM GMT
    And in every "inclusion" there was a stereotypical queen. How is that progress?
  • Amelorn

    Posts: 231

    Oct 28, 2013 11:18 AM GMT
    The manner of portrayal is just as important as the act of even portraying.

    Take modern family. On the one hand, I am very happy that it's now accepted that gays are still part of the family. I like that their presence is welcomed/matter of fact. I am conflicted over their portrayal as upper middle class white professionals. As we know, all gay couples live in 3000+ sq ft homes with a $100,000 kitchen. icon_rolleyes.gif I am decidedly displeased with equating the stereotypically effeminate Cam as having the (emotional) stability of a fragile souffle with Mitch in "bitch mode" 1/3 of the time.
  • Torrecon1826

    Posts: 23

    Oct 28, 2013 12:13 PM GMT
    Who does she - OR... HE... - the average newscaster - really, really! - you know what - think she IS!!?? In speaking to us and not referencing uus?

    I mean, co-one on, relate to us!! Things aren't the way they used to be! It's OUR world!
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    Oct 28, 2013 12:41 PM GMT
    I think visibility is important.

    I'm actually a fan of affirmative action, especially when it comes to media inclusion. A lot of social problems have to do with sexual racial and class normatives that make a lot of people feel marginalized and encourage dominant groups to marginalize those people.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Oct 28, 2013 2:27 PM GMT
    blackhawksfan saidAnd in every "inclusion" there was a stereotypical queen. How is that progress?

    There's usually a masc gay guy played by str8 actor to round it out.
  • CityofDreams

    Posts: 1173

    Oct 28, 2013 2:50 PM GMT
    In an increasingly media obsessed world, the younger generation needs to have access to characters that represent them. We were once those children/teens hoping to see our ourselves and our feelings on the screen. Positive gay visibility is essential for developing minds.
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    Oct 28, 2013 3:10 PM GMT
    I often thought about the inclusion of minority characters (sexual, racial, etc.) in TV and how to properly balance these characters so that no stereotypes are portrayed. I think the best way to do it is to have more than one "____type" of character on the show to view different angles of that community. Too often will there be a token, then something stereotypical pops up, and then there's no juxtaposition to show that not ALL of these people think this way. However, even after seeing Amelorn's criticism of the gay characters in Modern Family (above) and hearing some of the criticism of the gay characters in Scandal, (even interracial relationships as portrayed in Scandal) I wonder how hard it is to really make everybody happy - AND have a good show.
  • HottJoe

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    Oct 28, 2013 3:17 PM GMT
    HottieJ saidI often thought about the inclusion of minority characters (sexual, racial, etc.) in TV and how to properly balance these characters so that no stereotypes are portrayed. I think the best way to do it is to have more than one "____type" of character on the show to view different angles of that community. Too often will there be a token, then something stereotypical pops up, and then there's no juxtaposition to show that not ALL of these people think this way. However, even after seeing Amelorn's criticism of the gay characters in Modern Family (above) and hearing some of the criticism of the gay characters in Scandal, (even interracial relationships as portrayed in Scandal) I wonder how hard it is to really make everybody happy - AND have a good show.

    It's not possible to please everyone.
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    Oct 28, 2013 3:39 PM GMT
    I've only caught a few episodes of ABC Family's "The Fosters" but haven't seen any gay stereotypes (unless lipstick lesbians count).

    As for other stereotypes and TV cliches, that show's a veritable bonanza:

    1) The willowy attractive lesbians, a cop and a magnet school vice principal, live in a gorgeous million dollar professionally decorated, furnished, renovated and tastefully restored vintage Craftsman house in San Diego a stone's throw from the Pacific.

    2) The straight actresses convey lesbianism by wearing upswept 'dos while kicking ass by day, only letting their hair fall into long, soft ringlets nights and weekends.

    3) The lesbian cop wears her uniform home instead of checking it in to her locker along with her sidearm at the end of her shift like everyone else.

    4) The straight female police captain thinks partnering that lesbian with her nebbishy ex-husband in the same squad car, who like every other straight on the show is utterly devoid of common sense and parenting skill, is a smart move.

    5) They raise their marginally diverse, improbably attractive brood with a deft mixture of discipline and love - all while finding time to serve up hot home cooked meals for 8 'round their $3,000 kitchen farm table.


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    Oct 28, 2013 3:53 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI've only caught a few episodes of ABC Family's "The Fosters" but haven't seen any gay stereotypes (unless lipstick lesbians count).

    As for other stereotypes and TV cliches, that show's a veritable bonanza:

    1) The willowy attractive lesbians, a cop and a magnet school vice principal, live in a gorgeous million dollar professionally decorated, furnished, renovated and tastefully restored vintage Craftsman house in San Diego a stone's throw from the Pacific.

    2) The straight actresses convey lesbianism by wearing upswept 'dos while kicking ass by day, only letting their hair fall into long, soft ringlets nights and weekends.

    3) The lesbian cop wears her uniform home instead of checking it in to her locker along with her sidearm at the end of her shift like everyone else.

    4) The straight female police captain thinks partnering that lesbian with her nebbishy ex-husband in the same squad car, who like every other straight on the show is utterly devoid of common sense and parenting skill, is a smart move.

    5) They raise their marginally diverse, improbably attractive brood with a deft mixture of discipline and love - all while finding time to serve up hot home cooked meals for 8 'round their $3,000 kitchen farm table.




    Dead on!


    BTW: Why does "Cam" in Modern Family upset so many, yet they sit and watch "2 gays and a cunt" {or whatever that stupid show is} and the equally nauseous The A(sshole)-List, New York?
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    Oct 28, 2013 3:53 PM GMT
    First of all, the table was on sale at Restoration Hardware for $1999.99. But most importantly, do you really think Oprah looks like that when she is hoisted out of bed in the morning?
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    Oct 28, 2013 5:16 PM GMT
    Epothos saidI think visibility is important.


    That's why it is important for every gay man and woman to love an accept themselves enought to be who they truly are in all aspects of their lives - with their families, their coworkers, the people in their faith community. This way people who may never have a opportunity to know or interact with a gay person will know we aren't much different than they are. This is far more effective than people forming an opinion based on a silly stereotypical stock character from TV.
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    Oct 28, 2013 5:58 PM GMT
    thebearerofbadnews saiddoes it matter though?

    No it does not.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Oct 28, 2013 6:12 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    Epothos saidI think visibility is important.


    That's why it is important for every gay man and woman to love an accept themselves enought to be who they truly are in all aspects of their lives - with their families, their coworkers, the people in their faith community. This way people who may never have a opportunity to know or interact with a gay person will know we aren't much different than they are. This is far more effective than people forming an opinion based on a silly stereotypical stock character from TV.


    Believe it or not, but some gays and lesbians learn to love and accept themselves through positive support and portrayals—yes, even on TV. It's true of most groups of people, actually. Media portrayal is especially important in the very example you gave: people who may never have an opportunity to know or interact with gay people. Guess what source of information they base their opinions from? I'm not sure how you figure gays and lesbians who are "who they truly are in all aspects of their lives" are supposed to reach such individuals.
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    Oct 28, 2013 7:01 PM GMT
    The_Guruburu said
    UndercoverMan said
    Epothos saidI think visibility is important.


    That's why it is important for every gay man and woman to love an accept themselves enought to be who they truly are in all aspects of their lives - with their families, their coworkers, the people in their faith community. This way people who may never have a opportunity to know or interact with a gay person will know we aren't much different than they are. This is far more effective than people forming an opinion based on a silly stereotypical stock character from TV.


    Believe it or not, but some gays and lesbians learn to love and accept themselves through positive support and portrayals—yes, even on TV. It's true of most groups of people, actually. Media portrayal is especially important in the very example you gave: people who may never have an opportunity to know or interact with gay people. Guess what source of information they base their opinions from? I'm not sure how you figure gays and lesbians who are "who they truly are in all aspects of their lives" are supposed to reach such individuals.


    Believe it or not it was the media's portrayal of gay men as effeminate, limp wristed, high strung, overly emotional, etc. that kept me from accepting myself. It wasn't until the advent of the internest and websites like these where I got to meet a broad spectrum of gay men and realized not all gay men were what was portrayed in the media.

    To answer your question, the way gays and lesbians who are truly themselves in all aspects of their lives are visible to everyone they come into contact with in everyday life. Perceptions will change when more and more people see that we are just like them in many aspect and gay life isn't defined as La Cage aux Folles (not disparaging anyone just that is the perception many have about gay life and gay men).

    I think the media just reinforces the stereotype rather than contradicts it. I think it would be advantageous to have more gays behind the scenes and cameras rather than in front. I sure hope the gay characters written for TV and movies aren't being written by gay people. If they are, they are the problem.
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    Oct 28, 2013 7:13 PM GMT
    Considering most people excuse/pride themselves on not being so intelligent; and so many of those people surely are amongst the millions who watch television; either with intent for content, or as brain dead zombies; it stands to reason that what content that is shown on any channel people are tuned in to is actually really important.
    If you accept it as truth or not, the fact that you watch television; like any other medium, will have an effect on your choices and perspectives. Your subconscious reactions to which won't surface immediately, and will only be relative to your perspectives you hold before viewing.
    So, the more gay-normalizing the media becomes, and the more positive accepting atmosphere there is around homosexuality and the GLBTQC Communities, the better the outcome is; in the long run, for the Gay Community/the real world you live in when you log off the internet and go buy your groceries, lift weights, and come home for Thanksgiving.
    You can expect people to be iffy on the topic and social change in the first few years to a decade; the same way Hippy Culture, MTV, and the internet took time to be folded into the mainstream. Life isn't a script written for television and love songs, all the time, but it sure is great to know you're a part of a movement that can bring what you represent into a new era of acceptance.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Oct 28, 2013 7:31 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    The_Guruburu said
    UndercoverMan said
    Epothos saidI think visibility is important.


    That's why it is important for every gay man and woman to love an accept themselves enought to be who they truly are in all aspects of their lives - with their families, their coworkers, the people in their faith community. This way people who may never have a opportunity to know or interact with a gay person will know we aren't much different than they are. This is far more effective than people forming an opinion based on a silly stereotypical stock character from TV.


    Believe it or not, but some gays and lesbians learn to love and accept themselves through positive support and portrayals—yes, even on TV. It's true of most groups of people, actually. Media portrayal is especially important in the very example you gave: people who may never have an opportunity to know or interact with gay people. Guess what source of information they base their opinions from? I'm not sure how you figure gays and lesbians who are "who they truly are in all aspects of their lives" are supposed to reach such individuals.


    Believe it or not it was the media's portrayal of gay men as effeminate, limp wristed, high strung, overly emotional, etc. that kept me from accepting myself. It wasn't until the advent of the internest and websites like these where I got to meet a broad spectrum of gay men and realized not all gay men were what was portrayed in the media.

    To answer your question, the way gays and lesbians who are truly themselves in all aspects of their lives are visible to everyone they come into contact with in everyday life. Perceptions will change when more and more people see that we are just like them in many aspect and gay life isn't defined as La Cage aux Folles (not disparaging anyone just that is the perception many have about gay life and gay men).

    I think the media just reinforces the stereotype rather than contradicts it. I think it would be advantageous to have more gays behind the scenes and cameras rather than in front. I sure hope the gay characters written for TV and movies aren't being written by gay people. If they are, they are the problem.

    Every time the media tries to contradict the stereotype they hire straight actors to play gay roles and use material written by straight writers...
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    Oct 28, 2013 7:39 PM GMT
    blackhawksfan saidAnd in every "inclusion" there was a stereotypical queen. How is that progress?

    Not really, take Brothers and Sisters and Scandal for example, not queens. Even The Good Wife has the lesbian that doesn't seem to be stereotypical of what you would expect.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2013 7:39 PM GMT
    I rarely watch TV shows anymore well except for THE VOICE and THE AMAZING RACE and sometimes that new show Elementary with Lucy Liu (I like her). LGBT characters are portrayed as stereo-typical on TV shows (like the 2 gay guys on Modern Family, that Femme Jack guy (Sean Hayes?) who has a new show on NBC). I don't know, I'm a little dissappointed with the lack of minorities on TV. My friend and I had a talk the other day...Ex *On Grey's Anatomy, they live and work in Seattle right? and not even 1 recurring Asian male doctor on the show! just Sandra Oh as Dr. Cristina Yang! I was like what part of Seattle are they living in, Asian males doctors are like abundant in that city/US. (Also, no Latino male doctors in that show, too)!! Hmmmm.

    Anyway, I came down to a conclusion of TV executives just want to make $$ and rating, they like to play safe most of the time. I don't think they like gays or other minorities that much. (If they portray them, usually it's just for comic relief/stereo-typical)

    So I ended up watching older seasons of the Amazing Race, at least with that show, I'd learn so much about the world, other people's cultures and it's fun/entertaining to watch super competitive teams bitching at each other. And sometimes, they have eye candies like the 2 male models who won Season 10 Tyler & James! icon_cool.gif Still my favorite season ever.


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    Oct 28, 2013 7:44 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    UndercoverMan said
    The_Guruburu said
    UndercoverMan said
    Epothos said


    Every time the media tries to contradict the stereotype they hire straight actors to play gay roles and use material written by straight writers...


    If true, that's a problem.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Oct 28, 2013 7:49 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    HottJoe said
    UndercoverMan said
    The_Guruburu said
    UndercoverMan said
    Epothos said


    Every time the media tries to contradict the stereotype they hire straight actors to play gay roles and use material written by straight writers...


    If true, that's a problem.

    Brokeback Mountain is the prime example. But Jack on Dawson's Creek, the straight acting guy on Glee, the core cast of Milk, Will from Will & Grace, etc. it seems like straight acting gay men are primarily portrayed by actual straight men.

    The only PC solution I can think of is that masc gay men need to be as publicly out as fem gay men... and that includes being out in the workplace.