Setting clocks for Standard Time in the US

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2013 3:07 PM GMT
    So today's the day we set our clocks back an hour in the US (Fall - back; Spring - forward). But in the modern world is it really worth the effort, with artificial illumination everywhere? Does this candle-lit 18th-Century concept have a place today?
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    Nov 03, 2013 3:38 PM GMT
    I think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..
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    Nov 03, 2013 3:50 PM GMT
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it.

    I wish *I* didn't have to do it. Despite many clocks that set themselves, on the computers, cell phones, tablets, printer, wireless home phones, TV, BluRay, et al, there are still many of ours that don't. I hate this semi-annual clock resetting ritual.
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Nov 03, 2013 4:01 PM GMT
    I just dont like how early it gets dark. All I wanna do is.... hunker down with a bottle of vodka and pray for daylight.
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    Nov 03, 2013 4:40 PM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    ART_DECO saidSo today's the day we set our clocks back an hour in the US (Fall - back; Spring - forward). But in the modern world is it really worth the effort, with artificial illumination everywhere? Does this candle-lit 18th-Century concept have a place today?

    We have so many damn power outages in Boca (most last only a second or two, but still) that I don't bother setting a lot of my clocks---not the one on the microwave or the stove or the coffeemaker. My alarm clock is battery-operated for that reason.

    Down here in Wilton Manors/Fort Lauderdale, too. I lived for years in parts of rural North Dakota and Minnesota, and never had the frequent power interruptions we have in more "developed" South Florida.

    Many are quick "burps" that disrupt the microwave and oven clocks, but not much else. All the rest either reset themselves or are on battery power.

    And BTW, as I posted in another thread to you, congrats on passing 30,000 posts the other day! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 03, 2013 5:56 PM GMT
    The whole concept is so fundamentally stupid. Even if it made sense for factory workers to get up an hour earlier during part of the year, why don't they just get up an hour earlier instead of pretending that the time is different? Farmers have managed to do it for millennia.
  • TheAlchemixt

    Posts: 2294

    Nov 03, 2013 9:34 PM GMT
    I just saw this. That's why.... I'm an hour early.
  • BillandChuck

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    Nov 03, 2013 9:35 PM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..

    Arizona and Hawaii.
    Hawaii in the entirety of our state maintains HST all year, but Arizona is all except for the Navajo nation, which does observe MDT (inexplicably).

    Having lived in the Northeast, the preservation of daylight was pleasant and helped get more enjoyment out of summer days. It's the standard time late afternoon sunset and darkness that's the drag.
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    Nov 03, 2013 11:00 PM GMT
    ART_DECO saidSo today's the day we set our clocks back an hour in the US (Fall - back; Spring - forward). But in the modern world is it really worth the effort, with artificial illumination everywhere? Does this candle-lit 18th-Century concept have a place today?


    I think it's dumb but the rationale is that DST saves energy by better timing when we do and don't use lights.

    So by that reasoning, it's actually more worth the effort with artificial illumination. But as energy usage patterns have changed and illumination makes up a smaller percentage of our energy usage, even that rationale has come under criticism.

    For the geeks like me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time
  • jo2hotbod

    Posts: 3603

    Nov 03, 2013 11:06 PM GMT
    I still use candles so I like it
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Nov 03, 2013 11:11 PM GMT
    From my narrow point of view, Daylight Savings Time is backwards.



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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2013 11:21 PM GMT
    I grew up in Indiana, where we didn't celebrate DST. In the summer, we were Central time zone, and in the winter, we were Eastern. We called it "slow time" and "fast time".

    We were cool like that . . .
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    Nov 03, 2013 11:44 PM GMT
    I could do without it. Ohio I usually dark all winter anyways. Plus, it usually means I spend an extra hour at work lol.
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    Nov 03, 2013 11:44 PM GMT
    hoosier_daddy saidI grew up in Indiana, where we didn't celebrate DST. In the summer, we were Central time zone, and in the winter, we were Eastern. We called it "slow time" and "fast time".

    We were cool like that . . .

    I lived a couple of years in Kentucky, which like Indiana is partly in the Eastern Time Zone, and partly Central. In fact, Indiana is one of the most western parts of the Eastern time zone.

    Which means your Summer nights stay light incredibly late, not totally dark until nearly midnight in June & July. But conversely, morning sunrise is very late, compared to other parts of the country.

    But that's the thing with this whole idea of daylight savings time: the daylight hours aren't the same everywhere in the US in relation to the sun, because the US time zones are so wide. So you can argue that YOUR part of the US sees an earlier or later sunrise & sunset, as the time changes to and from daylight savings, but that isn't what EVERYONE is experiencing from coast to coast by the clock, nor from North to South. NYC sees an earlier sunrise with the change to EDT, but Louisville, KY still sees a fairly late sunrise for its morning commute.

    Furthermore, US time zones were set up by the railroads in the mid-1800s, and often make no good geographical or even political sense. There's no reason why 4 midwestern States (Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota & North Dakota) are each split between Central and Mountain Time. Those States should all be completely in Central Time.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Nov 04, 2013 1:03 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..

    Arizona and Hawaii.


    This video is awesome and answers this question (and lots more!)

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    Nov 04, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    Europe does it. If Europe does it, we should, because Europe is better.

    EUROPE - LMAO

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    French_Frog.jpg

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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 04, 2013 6:56 PM GMT
    Had no problems with this at all. I already wake up to early anyways. Grew up without DST, but moved to CO where I had to start waking up an hour earlier than I had already had, for work. My solution, always be ready by the time others start to get ready to leave early. I'm always DST-Punctual, 365/12!

    If I ever do have a problem; I'll just look up and shake my fist.
    (j.k)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 04, 2013 8:22 PM GMT
    Bunjamon saidThis video is awesome and answers this question (and lots more!)

    That video was great! Thanks.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Nov 04, 2013 8:35 PM GMT
    I like extended daylight hours. I can get up in the dark and get ready for the day and actually enjoy the sunrise whereas darkness in early afternoon is depressing. In the warm months the late sunset just means tennis in the cool of the evening or more time out on the water. Not too tough to correct the clocks twice/year.
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    Nov 04, 2013 11:43 PM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..

    Arizona and Hawaii.


    Indiana.

    the whole time change thing is kinda lame to me -- and I think we're in a society that doesn't need it anymore (USA at least). I prefer standard time anyway.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Nov 05, 2013 3:28 AM GMT
    willular said
    Aristoshark said
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..

    Arizona and Hawaii.


    Indiana.

    the whole time change thing is kinda lame to me -- and I think we're in a society that doesn't need it anymore (USA at least). I prefer standard time anyway.


    "Since April 2, 2006, all counties in Indiana observe daylight saving time."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_in_Indiana
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    Nov 05, 2013 7:58 AM GMT
    davidingeorgia saidI think Arizona is the only state that dosent do it..


    Hawaii stays on Standard Time.
  • Beeftastic

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    Nov 05, 2013 5:48 PM GMT
    I wish is was Daylight Savings all year, it gets dark too quick otherwise!
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    Nov 05, 2013 7:15 PM GMT
    tuckers_kahuna saidI wish is was Daylight Savings all year, it gets dark too quick otherwise!

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    Nov 06, 2013 5:18 PM GMT
    tuckers_kahuna saidI wish is was Daylight Savings all year, it gets dark too quick otherwise!


    I hate that it's dark at 5:30 p.m. here in Dallas on Standard Time. Uhh.