America's poorest kids (Documentary)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 13, 2013 3:40 PM GMT

    It's a bit painful and shocking to watch this documentary...
    Painful because watching these kids and their parents struggling to find shelter, food, education, health care etc. is agonizing
    Shocking because, it's seen in the richest nation in the world!

    Seems like these are bad days for Americans...
    I always wonder why your govt. spends more money on technology which kills people(like military) than investing in those that saves people(like education).
    It's foolish to see a man constructing fence around his home while his house was slowly burning down to ash. It's just absurd. icon_confused.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 13, 2013 4:39 PM GMT
    The gulf between the very rich and the very poor has never been so wide. The government is more likely to rely on handouts to the poor, rather than enforce fair labor practices, because the culture doesn't think it's fair to make business owners pay decent wages, when poor people are willing to work for dirt. Democrats are trying to broaden healthcare, at risk of being ousted, but no one is doing anything significant for education, while republicans smear "unskilled" laborers, calling them lazy bottom feeders. There's no such thing as unskilled laborers. Everyone's job takes skill and is hard. If the domestic policies in America don't change, and the climate continues to become unstable, there will be a bloody revolution, and the greedy elite will be cut down to size, their designer clothes left drenched in the streets.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Nov 13, 2013 7:26 PM GMT
    Harry7785 said
    I always wonder why your govt. spends more money on technology which kills people(like military) than investing in those that saves people(like education).
    It's foolish to see a man constructing fence around his home while his house was slowly burning down to ash. It's just absurd. icon_confused.gif

    First of all, that the US is "the wealthiest nation on earth" is at best a myth and in actuality an illusion. But this is not a uniquely US problem. Your inability to understand what shapes government policy lies in your not knowing what money is (debt) and how the financial system (a global empire) actually works.

    Money is created out of nothing more than a promise to repay a debt. But interest is added to that debt, guaranteeing that there will always be greater debt than the supply of money can ever repay. Thus, poverty (wether in the US or elsewhere) is guaranteed by the global financial system. "Debt (money) is the weapon used to conquer and enslave society (globally, wherever fractional reserve banks exist) and interest is its prime ammunition.":

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    Nov 13, 2013 9:52 PM GMT
    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(nominal)[/url]
    gdpbycountrty_zps3b29f595.gif

    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita[/url]
    gdppercapita_zpsf7e27b72.gif

    http://247wallst.com/special-report/2012/04/18/the-worlds-most-resource-rich-countries/3/

    3. Saudi Arabia
    > Total resource value: $34.4 trillion
    > Oil reserves (value): 266.7 billion barrels ($31.5 trillion)
    > Natural gas reserves (value): 258.5 trillion cu. ft. ($2.9 trillion)
    > Timber reserves (value): not in top 10

    Saudi Arabia has nearly 20% of the world’s oil — the greatest share among all countries. In fact, all of the country’s resource value is derived from hydrocarbons — either oil or gas. The kingdom has the world’s fifth-largest amount of proved natural gas reserves. Because these resources are depleting, Saudi Arabia eventually will run out of them and lose its high standing on this list. However, this will not happen for several decades.

    2. United States
    > Total resource value: $45 trillion
    > Oil reserves (value): not in top 10
    > Natural gas reserves (value): 272.5 trillion cu. ft. ($3.1 trillion)
    > Timber reserves (value): 750 million acres ($10.9 trillion)

    The U.S. has 31.2% of the world’s proved coal reserves. Worth an estimated $30 trillion, this is by far the most valuable supply of any nation on earth. There is also 750 million forested acres in the country, which are worth nearly $11 trillion. Timber and coal combined are worth roughly 89% of the country’s total natural resource value. The U.S. is also in the top five nations globally for copper, gold and natural gas.

    1. Russia
    > Total resource value: $75.7 trillion
    > Oil reserves (value): 60 billion barrels ($7.08 trillion)
    > Natural gas reserves (value): 1,680 trillion cu. ft. ($19 trillion)
    > Timber reserves (value): 1.95 billion acres ($28.4 trillion)

    Russia is the world’s richest country when it comes to natural resources. It leads all other nations in the size of both its natural gas and timber reserves. The country’s vast size is both a blessing and a curse since economical transportation for gas (pipelines) and for timber (railroads) are significantly costly to build. In addition to having such large gas and timber reserves, Russia has the world’s second-largest deposits of coal and the third-largest deposits of gold. Additionally, it has the second-largest estimated deposits of rare earth minerals, although none are currently being mined.


    Top 10 resource rich countries viewed per capita:

    Saudi Arabia $34.3 trillion/28,290,000 people = $1,212,442 per person
    Canada 33.2 trillion/33,880,000 = $979,929
    Australia 19.9 trillion/22,680,000 = $877,425
    Russia 75.7 trillion/143,500,000 = $527,526
    Iraq 15.9 trillion/32,580,000 = $488,029
    Venezuela 14.4 trillion/29,950,000 = $480,801
    Iran 27.3 trillion/76,420,000= $357,276
    United States 45 trillion/313,900,000 = $143,357
    Brazil 21.8 trillion/198,700,000 = $109,713
    China 23 trillion/1,351,000,000 = $17,024