HAPPY HOLIDAYS: Winter Solstice / The 12 Days of Christmas / Twelfth Night (Shakespeare?) / Epiphany / Zodiac on the Holy of Holies, Temple of Jerusalem, Jesus' Father's House of Prayer

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    Nov 17, 2013 10:23 PM GMT
    Winter Solstice - Wikipedia

    The winter solstice is the solstice that occurs in winter. It is the time at which the sun appears at noon at its lowest altitude above the horizon.

    In the Northern Hemisphere this is the Southern solstice, the time at which the Sun is at its southernmost point in the sky, which usually occurs on December 21 to 22 each year. In the Southern Hemisphere this is the Northern solstice, the time at which the Sun is at its northernmost point in the sky, which usually occurs on June 20 to 21 each year.


    Twelve Holy Days - Wikipedia

    The night between December 24 and 25 is considered to be the most Holy Night, when the visible Sun ... "Light of the World", the Christ, commences its journey from the south to the north.

    Astrologically, on the night when the sun commences the visible northward journey, to save the northern hemisphere of the globe from a perpetual winter and consequent extermination of life should the sun remain always in the south, the zodiacal sign Virgo, the Celestial Virgin (the "Queen of Heaven"), stands upon the eastern horizon at midnight; thus the Savior is "born of a virgin" without other intermediary, hence, "immaculately conceived.

    From December 26 to January 6, Epiphany or the "Twelfth Day", the twelve Zodiacal hierarquies work upon the Earth and its life forms, along with the Christ light which continues throughout the twelve holy days.

    As also defined in the liturgical calendar, the night of January 6, that precedes daytime, Epiphany or the "Twelfth Day" (as with the Christmas Day, the associated evenings of the twelve days begin on the evening before the specified day), is seen as the Twelfth Night, the time when the "Rite of Baptism" was performed in early Christianity. This period of [twelve days], initiating after Christmas Day and culminating with the Celebration of the Epiphany, is regarded as the spiritual heart of the year to follow and is termed the year's "Holy of Holies".
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    Nov 17, 2013 10:24 PM GMT
    A 17th-century fresco from the Cathedral of Living Pillar in Georgia depicting the Christ within the Zodiac circle.

    270px-Zodiac_and_the_Christ.jpg
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    Nov 17, 2013 10:44 PM GMT
    The Veil of the Temple


    Did Josephus describe the Temple veil has being unusually strong?



    Reply:


    I can find no such description in Josephus. When praising the former splendor of the destroyed Jerusalem Temple, Josephus describes the veil as follows:



    "The Temple had…golden doors of fifty-five cubits altitude and sixteen in breadth; but before these doors there was a veil of equal largeness with the doors.

    It was a Babylonian curtain, embroidered with blue, and fine linen, and scarlet, and purple, and of a contexture that was truly wonderful.

    Nor was this mixture of colors without its mystical interpretation, but was a kind of image of the universe;


    for by the scarlet there seemed to be enigmatically signified fire,

    by the fine flax the earth,

    by the blue the air, and

    by the purple the sea….


    This curtain had also embroidered upon it all that was mystical in the heavens, excepting that of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, representing living creatures." (War 5.5.4 211-214. See also Ant 3.6.4 126, Ant 3.7.7 183 and Ant 8.3.3 and the story of Crassus and the wily priest Eleazar at Ant. 14.7.1)

    - http://www.josephus.org/FlJosephus3/MailAndFAQNew.htm

    So this is why Reza Aslan, in the New York Times Bestseller, Zealot: the Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, says the veil of the Holy of Holies contained the image of the Zodiac.
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Nov 17, 2013 10:54 PM GMT
    There is also Saint Lucy's Day on December 13th

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy's_Day


    Yule
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule

    Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights
    Nov 27-Dec 5th, 2013

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanukkah


    Kwanzaa: Dec 26th - Jan 1st
    http://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org/index.shtml


    Boxing Day: December 26th
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxing_Day


    I"m doing my yule log on Winter Solstice icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 17, 2013 10:57 PM GMT
    metta8 saidThere is also Saint Lucy's Day on December 13th

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy's_Day




    I"m doing my yule log on Winter Solstice icon_smile.gif


    So, Shakespeare covers not only the Winter Solstice with 12th Night but also the Summer Solstice with Midsummer's Night Dream.
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:01 PM GMT
    metta8 saidThere is also Saint Lucy's Day on December 13th

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy's_Day


    Yule (I'll have to check this out. StephenOABC)



    Fascinating.

    Saint Lucy's Day - Wikipedia

    December 13

    It was commonly believed in Scandinavia as late as the end of the 19th century that this was the longest night of the year, coinciding with Winter Solstice.[2] The same can be seen in the poem "A Nocturnal upon S. Lucy's Day, Being the Shortest Day" by the English poet John Donne.

    While this does not hold for our current Gregorian calendar, a discrepancy of 8 days would have been the case in the Julian calendar during the 14th century, resulting in Winter solstice falling on December 13. With the original adoption of the Gregorian calendar in the 16th century the discrepancy was 10 days and had increased to 11 days in the 18th century when Scandinavia adopted the new calendar, with Winter solstice falling on December 9.

    It is very difficult to tell the exact date of the Winter solstice without modern equipment (although the Neolithic builders of the Newgrange monument seem to have managed it). The day itself is not visibly shorter than the several days leading up to and following it and although the actual Julian date of Winter solstice would have been on the December 15 or 14 at the time when Christianity was introduced to Scandinavia, December 13 could well have lodged in peoples mind as being the shortest day.

    The choice of 13 December as Saint Lucy's day, however, obviously predates the 8 day error of the 14th century Julian calendar. This date is attested in the pre-Tridentic Monastic calendar, probably going back to the earliest attestations of her life in the 6th and 7th centuries, and it is the date used throughout Europe.

    At the time of Saint Lucy's death, Winter solstice fell on December 21 and the date of the birth of Christ on the 25th. The latter was also celebrated as being the day when the Sun was born, the birthday of Sol Invictus, as can be seen in the Chronography of 354. This latter date was thought by the Romans to be the Winter solstice and it is natural to think of the sun being born that day. Early Christians considered this a likely date for their saviour's nativity, as it was commonly held that the world was created on Spring equinox (thought to fall on March 25 at the time), and that Christ had been conceived on that date, being born 9 months later on Winter solstice.

    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy%27s_Day[/url]
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:01 PM GMT
    Saturnalia!

    http://www.e-sheep.sansara.net.ua/www.e-sheep.com/Saturnalia/
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:06 PM GMT
    I'm so tired of the war on Easter. Keep Christ in Arbor Day!
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:10 PM GMT
    paradox saidSaturnalia!

    http://www.e-sheep.sansara.net.ua/www.e-sheep.com/Saturnalia/



    The Increasing Period of Saturnalia Celebration

    This Saturnalia problem may sound familiar. After all, stores put out their Christmas merchandise before Halloween these days.

    The Saturnalia was originally celebrated in Ancient Rome for only a day, but it was so popular it soon it lasted a week, despite Augustus' efforts to reduce it to three days, and Caligula's, to five. Like our Christmas, this important holy day (feriae publicae) was for more than fun and games. Saturnalia was a time to honor the god of sowing, Saturn. But again, like our Christmas, it was also a festival day (dies festus) on which a public banquet was prepared. An effigy of the god was probably one of the guests.
    Saturnalia Was the Best Part of the Roman Year

    The poet Catullus describes Saturnalia as the best of days. It was a time of celebration, visits to friends, and gift-giving, particularly of wax candles (cerei), and earthenware figurines (sigillaria). The best part of the Saturnalia (for slaves) was the temporary reversal of roles. Masters served meals to their slaves who were permitted the unaccustomed luxuries of leisure and gambling. Clothing was relaxed and included the peaked woollen cap that symbolized the freed slave, which looks an awful lot like Santa Claus's peaked red hat . A member of the familia (family plus slaves) was appointed Saturnalicius princeps, roughly, Lord of Misrule.

    http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/saturnalia/a/saturnalia.htm

    So, Paradox, or you saying St. Paul said, slave, obey your master, with the Saturnalia in mind?

    P.S.: I have to pay attention to Saturn, one of the Cabinet Members of Solar System Heaven, since Saturn is prominent in my astrological portfolio.
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:16 PM GMT
    McGay saidI'm so tired of the war on Easter. Keep Christ in Arbor Day!

    Isn't Easter smybolized by chocolate bunnies?
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:18 PM GMT
    I just like that comic. <shrug>
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:20 PM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    McGay saidI'm so tired of the war on Easter. Keep Christ in Arbor Day!

    Isn't Easter smybolized by chocolate bunnies?


    Ok then. Keep Hal in Halloween!
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Nov 17, 2013 11:28 PM GMT
    Pagan Origin of Easter/ Origin of Easter egg hunts

    http://www.terrorsofmen.com/3397/pagan-origin-of-easter-origin-of-easter-egg-hunts

  • Nov 17, 2013 11:49 PM GMT
    I'll take my Yule on the solstice and my eggs and bunnies on the original Ostara (a fertility festival), thanks. Why do Christians have to steal pagan holidays? It's rude.

    Jesus was born in the spring, since there were lambs and flocks of sheep out that night. The star was probably an especially well-lighted Venus. So nothing to do with December. Except, oh yeah, pagans had been celebrating the rebirth of sun gods in many different cultures for centuries so why not just move JC's birthdate? It's a perfect opportunity to horn in on all the god-birthing.
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    Nov 17, 2013 11:52 PM GMT
    I'll be needing to get my dusty, old Festivus pole out of storage soon...icon_neutral.gif
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    Nov 19, 2013 12:15 PM GMT
    This, I get/understand:

    Approximately 10,500 years ago the astrological age changed from the Age of Virgo to the Age of Leo as the sun 'precessed' out of the astrological sign of Virgo (1st degree) into the 30th degree of Leo.

    To characterize this event, (change from Age of Virgo to Age of Leo) in an allegorical context, an ancient astrologer/astronomer would describe this as 'The Sun being born of a 'Virgin' (Virgo) as a king (Leo is the 'king like' sign of the zodiac). Or, in a type of metaphorical code: "The Son of God, born of a Virgin as a king". Only ancient astrologer/astronomers (Wise Men) would recognize the astronomical/astrological allegory as talking about the changing of an astrological age.
  • metta

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    Nov 20, 2013 3:08 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Nov 27, 2013 4:39 PM GMT
    December 23rd
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festivus


    festivus.png

  • stratavos

    Posts: 1831

    Nov 30, 2013 5:09 AM GMT
    just to throw a comedic angle into it, don't forget about hanukkah:

  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 10, 2013 6:39 AM GMT
    1459936_746374902056791_1735313747_n.jpg
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 22, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    Happy Yule & Winter Solstice icon_smile.gif

    1499533_1502760593283320_122206121_n.jpg



    1524564_1502759696616743_2057439212_n.jp




    BlessedYule12.jpg
  • metta

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    Dec 22, 2013 5:35 PM GMT
    Oh my gosh... Festivus is tomorrow! I hope you are all ready to celebrate. Do you have your poles ready?
  • metta

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    Dec 23, 2013 5:23 AM GMT
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 23, 2013 5:24 AM GMT
    I wish everyone a very special Festivus!


    festivus.jpg
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 26, 2013 1:03 AM GMT
    White Wine In The Sun by Tim Minchin