What do you wear on an overnight flight?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2013 5:45 AM GMT
    Hi friends

    This summer, I will have a 10 hour flight to Argentina from Dallas and am unsure what I should wear. I'll be starting out in Tulsa so of course it'll be like 80-90F (in May), but once I land in Buenos Aires (where it'll be winter) I suspect the temperature will be ~50ish.

    I'm thinking of just wearing a pair of nice, well-fitting sweatpants and a hoodie, because I'll be taking an Ambien and wanting to sleep at least half of the flight, but I don't want to be wearing sweatpants my first day in Buenos Aires.

    Do y'all usually just wear comfortable clothes and change once you get to your destination, change on the plane in that cramped bathroom, or do you tough it out and wear clothes on the plane that you'd want to be wearing at your destination.
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    Nov 24, 2013 6:34 AM GMT
    I do bring a change of clothes, and yes it will be cooler once you get to Ezeiza. I suggest that you pack a nice new pair of pants/jeans, and a polo shirt or such for when you go through Migrations and Customs. Looking like a slob when crossing borders does not inspire confidence in the host country's officials. They will be neatly dressed. You should be too for the least probability of being subjected to a cavity search.

    Have a great trip! I was in BsAs two different times for a total of five weeks earlier this year. I'm planning on going back next year for a month.
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    Nov 24, 2013 6:40 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidI do bring a change of clothes, and yes it will be cooler once you get to Ezeiza. I suggest that you pack a nice new pair of pants/jeans, and a polo shirt or such for when you go through Migrations and Customs. Looking like a slob when crossing borders does not inspire confidence in the host country's officials. They will be neatly dressed. You should be too for the least probability of being subjected to a cavity search.

    Have a great trip! I was in BsAs two different times for a total of five weeks earlier this year. I'm planning on going back next year for a month.


    So you just change into the clothes once you get close to landing?

    Thanks!
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    Nov 24, 2013 7:33 AM GMT
    Avsigkommen said
    GAMRican saidI do bring a change of clothes, and yes it will be cooler once you get to Ezeiza. I suggest that you pack a nice new pair of pants/jeans, and a polo shirt or such for when you go through Migrations and Customs. Looking like a slob when crossing borders does not inspire confidence in the host country's officials. They will be neatly dressed. You should be too for the least probability of being subjected to a cavity search.

    Have a great trip! I was in BsAs two different times for a total of five weeks earlier this year. I'm planning on going back next year for a month.


    So you just change into the clothes once you get close to landing?

    Thanks!


    Yes. And, plan your clothes change time about 1.5-2 hours before landing. Once the crew starts making announcements in preparation for landing and/or any final food and beverage service begins people start heading for the lavatories and the lines start to form. You want to get ahead of that rush.

    I was there in May and early June this year and the weather did get cool and wet. Think San Francisco type weather.

    Some other tips...

    Consider using Xoom.com to change your US$ into ARS$ (pesos). You get a great rate and don't have to change money with the arbolitos (dangerous). You pick the money up at a "More Money Transfer" store. It's safe, you will need your passport only, and the address and phone where you will be staying in Argentina. Don't use credit cards. The exchange rate will kill you. Don't change too much money when you get to the airport. Change just enough to get you into town. Use the Manuel Tienda Leon bus service to get to El Centro in town, it's the best value and costs less than a taxi and they may even take you to the door of your lodging if you are within a short distance of El Centro.

    Consider using Airbnb to find inexpensive lodging. Depending upon how long you stay, a month can be as cheap as about US$800ish for a private apartamento.

    Back to changing money. Don't change more than about US$300 at a time. The exchange rate fluctuates AND you don't want to end up holding a lot of pesos at the end of your trip.

    Don't wear a lot of fancy clothes or you'll look like a tourist and be a possible mark for a mugging. Sportswear is popular (think Addidas track pants, polo shirts, kicks). It won't be mosquito season, but know that Dengue Fever is a public health issue.

    Bring an old, worn mochila. Don't carry a fancy new bag. Clothing and other durable goods are expensive.

    Do the Yellow Bus for a day. You'll get a great tour of the most popular comunas and then you can hoof it back to the places that you know you want to see more. It's worth it. Yes, it's totally tourist but again, it's worth it.

    Depending upon how long you will be in BsAs, get a Sube card for the Subte (subway) and collectivos (busses). You can get one at any Correo Agentino office. Be prepared with your passport. Don't load more than about ARS$50 pesos at a time unless you want unused value at the end of your stay. Don't even think of driving in BsAs. The lines on the road are only there for decoration, and the driving, like tango...is dangerous but also beautiful.

    You already speak "castellano", so you shouldn't have any problem. Just know that they speak "Rioplatense" so the pronunciation is wonderfully different. Check out the Dustin Luke YouTube videos for some insight. Also, get a copy of "Speaking Argento" and "Che Boludo" to be up on the street slang.

    If you're there long enough to make some friends, see if you can go to a "milonga". These are authentic tango clubs, and not just "tango show". There are also gay milonga as well. If you do go to a tango show, La Ventana was wonderful. If you can go to some event at Teatro Colon, it will be an experience of a lifetime. It's a theatre/opera house that is only rivaled by La Scala in Italy. If you do like to dance, consider taking a few tango lessons in Texas before you go on your trip. It will be worth it.

    If you're there at the end of May, the 25th is the celebration of the revolution. It's SOOOO worth it to head to Plaza de Mayo on that day. Consider wearing neutral colors or a futbol shirt of the National team. It's a very politically "colorful" event. Yes, the U.S. Dept. of State recommends staying away from such events, but if you go and smile and have fun and observe it will be amazing.

    Brook Palermo is a great night club. Don't get there any earlier than 11pm. The Porteños eat late, party late and party hard.

    Download a full copy of TripAdvisor to your phone. This was VERY useful. Also, there is a "Guia" app, which you can also download. No Yelp in Argentina. Check your cell phone provider to see if you can add Global Data Plan to your phone for a month. It will be VERY WELL worth it and you won't be trying to hunt for WiFi. Don't bother going the SIM card/GSM phone route if you don't have to. I have Verizon and was able to use my Samsung S3 about 30 minutes after I landed. It took about that long for the network to recognize my phone and plan, but it was worth it.

    They use 220v. Make sure you use an adapter AND a converter. Beware of bringing odd appliances like hair clippers because they may not work very well (mine worked "well enough", but not "normal").

    If you really want to be a great guest, bring your own toilet paper. That shit is expensive down there (no pun intended). Carrefour is the grocery that you will want to seek out for general items. Buy your fruits, vegetables, meats, and cheese from specialized stores or from street vendors (for produce). Dulce de Leche is BOMB! You will want to bring some home. Bring Ziplock bags to protect the jars on the way home.

    Check out "Victoria Cream" in Palermo. It's a posteria/helateria that will amaze you. Fredo is also good for cucurucho. Coca Cola is REALLY FUCKING GOOD in Argentina. I don't usually drink soda, but it's worth it in Argentina. Also, try the pomelo soda.

    Metal is precious. Your fork will bend if you push too hard. Really.

    Calle Florida is a tourist trap. Beware.

    Dude, BsAs is a FUCKING BLAST!!!! This is why I'm going back for another month in early 2014.

    Los Argentos son muy amable y tienen passion por la vida. Disfruta!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2013 8:00 AM GMT
    Thanks for the tip regarding when to change. That makes sense.

    I have read about Xoom on TripAdvisor and think that is the route I will go. It apparently is sometimes about a peso less than what is offered at cuaves, but it's much safer it seems and I don't have to carry around USD so that's what I'll go with. My hostel is in Palermo Soho, so should I still go for the bus service, or should I get a taxi at the airport? When I went to Mexico, I used a taxi every time I arrived in a new city to get to my destination.

    I'm staying in a hostel. I considered getting a short term apartment, but I'm traveling alone and I met many people using hostels in Mexico. Meeting people can sometimes be hard as a solo traveler but it never was when I was staying in the hostels in Mexico. I have already decided where I want to stay.

    I planned on just wearing jeans and hoodies, so nothing fancy, but I did plan on wearing cowboy boots like I do every day here at home. They are real comfortable. I asked a porteño around my age if I would look weird or stand out if I wore them (and sent a picture), and he said not to worry.

    I didn't know men carried 'fancy bags' haha. I have a cheap messenger bag that I bought in Mexico City for carrying around during the day. I prefer it over my backpack because it's in front of me at all times and I don't have to worry about it being stolen from while it is on me.

    I will be there for at least a month and I planned on getting a Subte card. I have already gotten an app where you put in your starting station/end station and it tells you which lines to take/when to transfer (that's offline). There's also actually a government website very similar to Google Maps where you put in your physical address and where you wish to go, and it will tell you where the nearest station is to your starting point and to your ending point. Very useful. Also, I would never think to drive anywhere in South America icon_razz.gif

    I've been learning some of the slang, like copado, 're', pelotudo, che, etc. I figure I'll learn the rest of the relevant slang once I'm there. I have heard of Dustin Luke though (the aforementioned porteño told me about him). I might have to check out his videos since you mentioned him.

    I will be there for May 25th, so that's good to know. I'll definitely be there.

    I actually think I will go the prepaid SIM route. I did so in Mexico and it worked out well. I did hate not having data all the time, but from what I have seen, Claro allows unlimited data for $1/day, so that won't be an issue. I have AT&T and their international plan is a joke. I didn't text or call that much while in Mexico and I doubt I will in Argentina. So pay-as-you-go works well for me.

    The only electronics I will bring are my phone/charger, and my laptop/charger. Apple makes all of its iDevice chargers to be 220V compliant, and my laptop is 220V compliant.

    I didn't really cook much at all during my month in Mexico, though depending on prices in Argentina, I might. It just usually ends up being equally expensive to cook for one person as it is to go out to eat.

    Have read about Calle Florida and I doubt I will even go there. There are many more areas in BsAs that aren't as touristy but offer just the same things.

    What did you think about the gay scene there? Were the guys romantically interested in you, just interested sexually, were they open to friendship? I guess this differs tremendously of course but sometimes I had a hard time meeting cute guys around my age-ish who didn't just wanna fuck. As a tourist in a foreign country, I like to make local friends and Grindr is a convenient way to do so, for example.

    Thanks for the helpful post.
  • ATLANTIS7

    Posts: 1213

    Nov 24, 2013 4:04 PM GMT
    Shocking Pink Barbara Cartland loved it!
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    Nov 24, 2013 4:55 PM GMT
    My responses are in BLUE.
    Avsigkommen saidThanks for the tip regarding when to change. That makes sense.

    I have read about Xoom on TripAdvisor and think that is the route I will go. It apparently is sometimes about a peso less than what is offered at cuaves, but it's much safer it seems and I don't have to carry around USD so that's what I'll go with.

    I found little need to have US$ on me in BsAs. Leave the US$ at home in your bank account. BTW, I only walked around BsAs with no more than ARS$1000, most of it in a pouch inside of my pants, a small amount in my regular pocket in case I got mugged. Also, I changed my money on Thursdays and Mondays. The "More Money Exchange" stores are closed on the weekend. Thursday's exchange was to get me through the weekend. Monday's exchange (if necessary) was for the week. Also, I took my money directly back to my apartment, and then took only what I needed out on the street with me.

    My hostel is in Palermo Soho, so should I still go for the bus service, or should I get a taxi at the airport?
    Yes, go with Manuel Tienda Leon. They will motor coach you to El Centro, then take you via a shuttle bus to your hostel. I know which on you're staying at near the Paseo Del Rosedal). And, it's about 1/3 the cost of a taxi. BTW, tangent, on the weekends the Paseo Del Rosedal is closed off to much auto traffic and everybody walks, bikes, skates, and skateboards around this huge park. It's worth it to take part in the fun and either rent a bike, skates or such.
    When I went to Mexico, I used a taxi every time I arrived in a new city to get to my destination.

    I'm staying in a hostel. I considered getting a short term apartment, but I'm traveling alone and I met many people using hostels in Mexico. Meeting people can sometimes be hard as a solo traveler but it never was when I was staying in the hostels in Mexico. I have already decided where I want to stay.

    I planned on just wearing jeans and hoodies, so nothing fancy, but I did plan on wearing cowboy boots like I do every day here at home. They are real comfortable. I asked a porteño around my age if I would look weird or stand out if I wore them (and sent a picture), and he said not to worry.
    You don't have anything to worry about. The boots, they will think you are from the provinces. You'll fit right in.

    I didn't know men carried 'fancy bags' haha. I have a cheap messenger bag that I bought in Mexico City for carrying around during the day. I prefer it over my backpack because it's in front of me at all times and I don't have to worry about it being stolen from while it is on me.
    Good choice, and yes, I see a lot of people wearing their mochila ON THEIR FRONT instead of on their back, especially on public transit (which can get very intimate during rush hour). Also, on a tangent, don't flash your iPhone or other fancy smartphone in public. Be discrete when using the GPS feature. Stop in a doorway or other such "cover" look, then walk.

    I will be there for at least a month and I planned on getting a Subte card. I have already gotten an app where you put in your starting station/end station and it tells you which lines to take/when to transfer (that's offline). There's also actually a government website very similar to Google Maps where you put in your physical address and where you wish to go, and it will tell you where the nearest station is to your starting point and to your ending point. Very useful. Also, I would never think to drive anywhere in South America icon_razz.gif

    I've been learning some of the slang, like copado, 're', pelotudo, che, etc. I figure I'll learn the rest of the relevant slang once I'm there. I have heard of Dustin Luke though (the aforementioned porteño told me about him). I might have to check out his videos since you mentioned him.

    There are also some gestures to know as well. Get those two books I mentioned.

    I will be there for May 25th, so that's good to know. I'll definitely be there.
    If you make acquaintance with a family they may invite you for "locro" and "empanadas". These will be VERY SPECIAL treats which are traditional Venticindo de Mayo foods. You should consider yourself blessed if this happens. It happened to me and I had the opportunity to enjoy these foods prepared by an 80yo grandmother from St. Miguel de Tucuman province. I was grateful for the honor of sharing the holiday with them.

    I actually think I will go the prepaid SIM route. I did so in Mexico and it worked out well. I did hate not having data all the time, but from what I have seen, Claro allows unlimited data for $1/day, so that won't be an issue. I have AT&T and their international plan is a joke. I didn't text or call that much while in Mexico and I doubt I will in Argentina. So pay-as-you-go works well for me.

    The only electronics I will bring are my phone/charger, and my laptop/charger. Apple makes all of its iDevice chargers to be 220V compliant, and my laptop is 220V compliant.
    Consider using Skype or Google Hangouts to communicate with folks back home. Way the fuck cheaper than phone.

    I didn't really cook much at all during my month in Mexico, though depending on prices in Argentina, I might. It just usually ends up being equally expensive to cook for one person as it is to go out to eat.
    A rib eye steak, with meat and cheese type appetizers, bread, and a WHOLE bottle of great malbac wine set me back a whole US$12.00...in a restaurant. I did save some money eating at the apartamento (especialidad desayuno), but I did end up eating out a lot because I wanted to try the restaurants.

    Have read about Calle Florida and I doubt I will even go there. There are many more areas in BsAs that aren't as touristy but offer just the same things.

    What did you think about the gay scene there? Were the guys romantically interested in you, just interested sexually, were they open to friendship? I guess this differs tremendously of course but sometimes I had a hard time meeting cute guys around my age-ish who didn't just wanna fuck. As a tourist in a foreign country, I like to make local friends and Grindr is a convenient way to do so, for example.
    I used Jack'd while there and the guys were hot, very friendly, sexually interested in me, and just really down to earth. I only hooked up once, and it was with a 21yo guy I met at a club. There are guys who just want to fuck.

    Thanks for the helpful post.

    My pleasure. Please feel free to post any other questions and I will answer them as best as I can.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Nov 24, 2013 5:13 PM GMT
    I take a change of shirt, underwear, socks, an electric razor, toothbrush and paste, and deodorant. And wear pants that are a bit loose and also won't look like you've slept in them all night. That with an airline blanket and pillow is enough.
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    Nov 24, 2013 5:20 PM GMT
    I've been known to change my shirt in the lav of the aircraft. I also always carry deodorant, toothbrush, etc and have done a quick wash/cleanup in the airport restroom when I have a layover.
  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Nov 24, 2013 5:21 PM GMT
    When returning from Mexico to Canada one January, I left Mexico in shorts and a t-shirt, but brought long pants and better shirt in my carry on. I changed in a bathroom at Toronto airport before I got to customs and defiantly before I hit the wall of weather outside!
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    Nov 24, 2013 5:29 PM GMT
    if i plan on sleeping i bring a change of clothes from my nice travel clothes. Usually old-fashioned sweatpants and a sweatshirt with loose undergarments so i can get some shuteye
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    Nov 24, 2013 6:26 PM GMT
    I usually like to wear only light clothing on the plane because otherwise it just gets rumpled, sweaty, and uncomfortable. So on long flights, and especially when changing climates, I have a complete layering system on me or in my carry-on. I've even resorted to those REI "convertible" shorts with the zip-off legs, which I always thought looked stupid and swore I would never buy. Er... hey they actually work in these cases. icon_redface.gif
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    Nov 24, 2013 6:40 PM GMT
    Manuel Tienda Leon bus with free taxi is the way to go. Any taxi driver at the airport WILL try and rip you off.

    Take some dollars with you, any shop or restaurant will take them.

    If you go to club Amerika on one night (I think it was Thursdays?) they do free drinks all night. They also have a "tunnel" which is like a semi-darkroom but for straight and gay people. There are some sights that go on in there!

    El Camanito is not really fun, just depressing. The Evita museum is quite good (the restaurant is good there too).

    Beer is crazy cheap. I liked the Quilmes Bock (the red one) best. If you return the bottles you get quite a bit back.

    Make sure you go to the choripan vans and try every option they have. The ones near the nature reserve in Puerte Madera are nice. I loved the chimichurri and would drench my choripan in it - yum! Also if you can go to a Chifu place I recommend doing so. There is a great one in San Telmo called Chifa San-Man. I loved the lomo saltado (like sweet and sour with chips)!

    You will have a great time there icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 24, 2013 6:55 PM GMT
    Dress for the climate you will be going to. Wear something that´s flexible.
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    Nov 24, 2013 7:54 PM GMT
    You can wear whatever you like but in a overnight flight I ought you to feel comfortable, then you can always change your outfit in the airport's bathroom...

    This is how I do it usually ;)

    Have a nice flight !
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    Nov 24, 2013 8:23 PM GMT
    Shawnathan saidSame as I wear to bed. Nothing.


    Pics or it didn't happen.

    Video if you prefer.

    or

    an invitation so I can give my eyewitness account... that will be acceptable, too.
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    Nov 24, 2013 9:52 PM GMT
    Something comfortable for the flight and then maybe a jacket and other winter accessories once you leavethe plane
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2013 11:25 PM GMT
    I have just worn cargo. Pants and layers t shirts, BA is lots of fun and a great city
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    Nov 25, 2013 12:09 AM GMT
    Thanks to everyone who replied. I am kind of surprised this topic got so many responses considering how slow the Travel section usually is.

    In response to GAMRican

    Does it cost anything to use Xoom? If so, is it a noticeable amount?

    Also, when you say "shuttle bus" do you mean a colectivo, or a taxi? Can you explain the Manuel Leon service a bit more in depth? I checked out the website but it was pretty vague, basically just saying "We offer high quality transportation to Argentina!" in 50 different ways :p

    About the phone, ah yes. I have an iPhone 5 and have read they are a hot commodity in Argentina due to the price of them there. I recall in Mexico when I would be with a friend and pull mine out, they would scold me to put it away. A friend of mine had his stolen from him from a motorcycle robber. I usually just plot my route at the hostel and count how many blocks I need to walk in which direction so I don't have to pull out my phone while walking.

    Getting a SIM isn't so much for the people back home. I just use Facebook to talk to them. It's more so if I meet a guy/friend, I can give them a phone number, so if I need to get a hold of them or they me, we have the bothersome phone call :p From what I was looking at on Claro's website, the prices are about what I would expect.
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    Nov 25, 2013 2:29 AM GMT
    Just go nekkid, that way you don't have to worry about what to wearicon_smile.gif
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    Nov 25, 2013 5:14 AM GMT
    I would wear exactly what you initially said....sweat pants and a hoodie. If you sleep like me, anything else is just going to get wrinkled curled up in a semi-fetal position.
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    Nov 25, 2013 5:43 AM GMT
    My response in BLUE.

    Avsigkommen saidThanks to everyone who replied. I am kind of surprised this topic got so many responses considering how slow the Travel section usually is.

    In response to GAMRican

    Does it cost anything to use Xoom? If so, is it a noticeable amount?

    Right now, to change US$300 (taken from a US bank account rather than a US credit card) into ARS$2616.30 (rate of 8.7210 pesos per US$), costs US$9.75. The "blue dollar rate" right now(http://dolarblue.net/) is ARS$9.95. You have to decide if the difference between the Xoom rate vs. Street rate and US$9.75 is worth the benefit of a legal exchange picked up at a safe commercial location. For me, that's cheap insurance to keep from getting mugged or worse. The way I was spending in BA, that much would last me a week or more.

    Also, when you say "shuttle bus" do you mean a colectivo, or a taxi? Can you explain the Manuel Leon service a bit more in depth? I checked out the website but it was pretty vague, basically just saying "We offer high quality transportation to Argentina!" in 50 different ways :p

    The shuttle bus is a comfortable, clean air-conditioned commercial "van" much like the Super Shuttles here in the U.S. They will pick you up/drop you off within a certain range of the El Centro autoparque terminal. From the El Centro autoparque terminal there is a comfortable, clean, air-conditioned motor coach style bus which goes back and forth to EZE. Paying for the service is simple at both EZE and/or at the autoparque. It runs 24 hours a day. Use pesos, not a credit card to get the best value.

    BTW, tangent, when you take a taxi, only take "Radio Taxi". Others may not be licensed by the city. Every licensed taxi will have a large laminated placard hanging from the back seat which has the name and photo of the driver along with his city issued license number.


    About the phone, ah yes. I have an iPhone 5 and have read they are a hot commodity in Argentina due to the price of them there. I recall in Mexico when I would be with a friend and pull mine out, they would scold me to put it away. A friend of mine had his stolen from him from a motorcycle robber. I usually just plot my route at the hostel and count how many blocks I need to walk in which direction so I don't have to pull out my phone while walking.

    Getting a SIM isn't so much for the people back home. I just use Facebook to talk to them. It's more so if I meet a guy/friend, I can give them a phone number, so if I need to get a hold of them or they me, we have the bothersome phone call :p From what I was looking at on Claro's website, the prices are about what I would expect.

    Smart about the SIM. I didn't have an Argentinean phone number to use while I was there and it could have been handy.


    BTW, it's official. I'm going back for the month of March (and some of April). My buddy from Denver is going with me. It's a "bucket list" trip for him. We're going to go down to Las Glaciares National Park. I'm waiting for Tuesday to check airfares (generally, that's the day of the week airlines release more inventory). I've also got a 20% discount voucher from United so that I can whore up my Premier 1K airmiles qualification for 2015. We've already found a nice Airbnb 2 bedroom apartment for about US$700 for the month.
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    Nov 25, 2013 5:48 AM GMT
    I usually free ball it on planes when I travel with my family. Just so I know I'll be comfortable an that I'll be able to breathe down there
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    Nov 25, 2013 6:49 AM GMT
    Rats. I should have said, "Tights and a cape." Oh well. Better wit next time.
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Nov 25, 2013 11:28 AM GMT
    Have a nice trip. Looks like you have given this some thought. I would suggest you were something comfortable for the flight. Once you get to your destination you can change.