Why have cats when so many other options for pets are available?

  • RetroFit

    Posts: 33

    Dec 02, 2013 1:45 PM GMT
    Cats are vermin and home to numerous disease causing organisms. What is the appeal of inviting an animal that struts and scratches its shit to share one's home? Those crap encrusted paws prance on kitchen counters, pillows and sheets! This seems to be an unhygenic situation; how can feline fans tolerate this?
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    Dec 02, 2013 2:14 PM GMT
    Maybe you should stick to an aquarium and leave everyone else to their own preference.


    8C8959731-130912-blobfish-1035a.blocks_d
  • RetroFit

    Posts: 33

    Dec 02, 2013 2:24 PM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite sid Maybe you should stick to an aquarium and leave everyone else to their own preference.


    As long as cat lovers are bringing food to potlucks and parties this Commercialmas it is a topic worth pursuing, LP.
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    Dec 02, 2013 6:26 PM GMT
    You for sure are a cat lover icon_eek.gificon_eek.gif
    Do you know that humans carry more diseases that a cat or a dog , and some of theirs can kill you !
    As a matter of fact it is safer for a dog or a cat to lick your face , than putting your tongue in a stranger" anus ...lol..
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    Dec 02, 2013 6:33 PM GMT
    I have cat allergies.

    I like birds.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 6:37 PM GMT
    Solomono saidI have cat allergies.

    I like birds.

    Birds should be appreciated in the wild. I think keeping them as pets is animal cruelty.
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    Dec 02, 2013 6:37 PM GMT
    Im not a cat lover. Sure they are cute... Im allergic as well. I love dogs, you can bathe them and they don't jump on your counters, etc. Cat hair all over EVERYTHING is disgusting. I remember being at a fancy dinner party where the host allowed the cat on the dinning room table so people could feed her. She thought it was sooo cute. I hurled.!!
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Dec 02, 2013 6:42 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    Solomono saidI have cat allergies.

    I like birds.

    Birds should be appreciated in the wild. I think keeping them as pets is animal cruelty.


    I have to agree with this.
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    Dec 02, 2013 6:44 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    Solomono saidI have cat allergies.

    I like birds.

    Birds should be appreciated in the wild. I think keeping them as pets is animal cruelty.


    Well we can say the same about many pets, and people who aren't vegan are cruel too .

    It's hard to appreciate some animals in the wild. I like to wake up to the sound of a bird singing. Unless I lived in the wild I can't have this.
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    Dec 02, 2013 6:49 PM GMT
    neffa saidYou for sure are a cat lover icon_eek.gificon_eek.gif
    Do you know that humans carry more diseases that a cat or a dog , and some of theirs can kill you !
    As a matter of fact it is safer for a dog or a cat to lick your face , than putting your tongue in a stranger" anus ...lol..


    +1

    Humans spread influenza, meningitis, tuberculosis, shingles, etc. etc. to each other! You have more chances of getting one of these diseases than the ones a healthy cat can pass on to a human.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 6:51 PM GMT
    Solomono said
    HottJoe said
    Solomono saidI have cat allergies.

    I like birds.

    Birds should be appreciated in the wild. I think keeping them as pets is animal cruelty.


    Well we can say the same about many pets, and people who aren't vegan are cruel too .

    It's hard to appreciate some animals in the wild. I like to wake up to the sound of a bird singing. Unless I lived in the wild I can't have this.

    Just move to an area with lot of trees and you'll hear them singing every day.

    There is a huge difference between domesticated pets and wild animals kept in cages. In the case of birds, they usually get their wings clipped. A lot of birds panic from being trapped in cages and self mutilate. Birds just don't develop healthy relationships with human pet owners, like dogs and cats do. They're just being robbed of their nature, which is to fly, migrate, and often mate for life.
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    Dec 02, 2013 7:04 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    Solomono said
    HottJoe said
    Solomono saidI have cat allergies.

    I like birds.

    Birds should be appreciated in the wild. I think keeping them as pets is animal cruelty.


    Well we can say the same about many pets, and people who aren't vegan are cruel too .

    It's hard to appreciate some animals in the wild. I like to wake up to the sound of a bird singing. Unless I lived in the wild I can't have this.

    Just move to an area with lot of trees and you'll hear them singing every day.

    There is a huge difference between domesticated pets and wild animals kept in cages. In the case of birds, they usually get their wings clipped. A lot of birds panic from being trapped in cages and self mutilate. Birds just don't develop healthy relationships with human pet owners, like dogs and cats do. They're just being robbed of their nature, which is to fly, migrate, and often mate for life.


    Not all birds can be domesticated but some can. I won't deprive them from mating and flying, eventually.

    Ps: Mating for life? That sounds whorish! I don't get that priviledge myself! Lol jk
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    Dec 02, 2013 7:21 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidJust move to an area with lot of trees and you'll hear them singing every day.

    There is a huge difference between domesticated pets and wild animals kept in cages. In the case of birds, they usually get their wings clipped. A lot of birds panic from being trapped in cages and self mutilate. Birds just don't develop healthy relationships with human pet owners, like dogs and cats do. They're just being robbed of their nature, which is to fly, migrate, and often mate for life.

    I don't know where you get your information from, but that's completely wrong. Most pet birds can form bonds with their human owners if they are treated well from the beginning. They can play outside of their cages if they are trained from an early age. Wing clipping is only to protect them from flying out of the house, and many times, it calms them down because they can't work themselves into a frenzy. It's not worth fighting about though.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 7:38 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    HottJoe saidJust move to an area with lot of trees and you'll hear them singing every day.

    There is a huge difference between domesticated pets and wild animals kept in cages. In the case of birds, they usually get their wings clipped. A lot of birds panic from being trapped in cages and self mutilate. Birds just don't develop healthy relationships with human pet owners, like dogs and cats do. They're just being robbed of their nature, which is to fly, migrate, and often mate for life.

    I don't know where you get your information from, but that's completely wrong. Most pet birds can form bonds with their human owners if they are treated well from the beginning. They can play outside of their cages if they are trained from an early age. Wing clipping is only to protect them from flying out of the house, and many times, it calms them down because they can't work themselves into a frenzy. It's not worth fighting about though.

    I got my latest information from a PBS documentary about Parrots. Probably one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever seen.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 7:42 PM GMT
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 7:47 PM GMT
    Also, I don't know how clipping the wings off a creature born to fly can be considered humane for pet owner claiming to love an animal that they mutilate. Would you clip the legs off a dog or the fins off a fish?
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    Dec 02, 2013 8:00 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    DudeInNOVA said
    HottJoe saidJust move to an area with lot of trees and you'll hear them singing every day.

    There is a huge difference between domesticated pets and wild animals kept in cages. In the case of birds, they usually get their wings clipped. A lot of birds panic from being trapped in cages and self mutilate. Birds just don't develop healthy relationships with human pet owners, like dogs and cats do. They're just being robbed of their nature, which is to fly, migrate, and often mate for life.

    I don't know where you get your information from, but that's completely wrong. Most pet birds can form bonds with their human owners if they are treated well from the beginning. They can play outside of their cages if they are trained from an early age. Wing clipping is only to protect them from flying out of the house, and many times, it calms them down because they can't work themselves into a frenzy. It's not worth fighting about though.

    I got my latest information from a PBS documentary about Parrots. Probably one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever seen.


    There is a vast, vast difference between the behaviors of wild-caught parrots (an absolutely inhumane process that has been banned in the US parrot trade since the 1990s, thankfully) and those of captive-reared parrots. I've had my conure for 13 years, since she was nine months old and hopped on my shoulder as I walked by in a pet store and refuse to leave (really). She is fully flighted and is only restricted to her cage at night -- when she goes to her cage and puts herself to bed -- or when nobody's home. Otherwise, she prefers to follow her people around. She tries to bathe in my water glass, she terrorizes my cats, she runs around throwing veggies everywhere when I'm cooking, and she mutters 'stop it, goddamn it' if we make too much noise when she's trying to sleep. She dances excitedly when I come home from work and asks for kisses and pouts when I leave.

    In other words, she's quite bonded, and more happily domesticated than my boyfriend.

    Generally, parrots self-mutilate out of boredom or agitation. Treat them well and keep them entertained, and there's no problem.

    As for cats...they're more self-sufficient than many gay men, so I like 'em.


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    Dec 02, 2013 8:02 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI got my latest information from a PBS documentary about Parrots. Probably one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever seen.

    So what? Documentaries are rarely balanced and accurate. They film the most heartbreaking stories and pass them off as what is common practice, which is a lie. They are deliberately manipulating your emotions. I'm not saying they're aren't some very bad people out there who mistreat animals, but it's not the norm.

    HottJoe saidAlso, I don't know how clipping the wings off a creature born to fly can be considered humane for pet owner claiming to love an animal that they mutilate. Would you clip the legs off a dog or the fins off a fish?

    You comparisons are completely inaccurate. Birds can't feel their feathers being clipped. It doesn't cause them pain the way amputating a body part would. And not everyone clips their birds' wings. Some bird owners think it's better to let them fly around. We neuter pets to keep them from overpopulating. That could be considered cruel too since breeding is what they were born to do.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 02, 2013 9:02 PM GMT
    I think you guys should just watch the video I posted. The video does address and explain in detail the points you're making here. It's pretty obvious that birds are meant to be in the sky and not in cages. There is no cage big enough. The behaviors of domesticated birds remind me of prisoners. No matter how much you may bond with them, it's just a second rate life, at best.
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    Dec 02, 2013 10:25 PM GMT
    HottJoe: I only had time to watch the first five minutes or so of the show at the moment, but it does make valid points: parrots can demanding animals. The larger species of macaws and cockatoos the documentary focused on in the first few minutes have very keen intellects and self-awareness on par with larger primates -- and 95% of people who live with them have absolutely no business doing so. Keeping them emotionally healthy takes a tremendous investment of time and dedication, and most of us can't and shouldn't take that responsibility on -- in much the same way that many, many people are not up to the task of dog ownership or raising children, actually.

    Still, from what I saw of the doc so far, it is fairly transparent from the framing of the narrative that it's going to carry a heavy bias, as DudeInNova points out. I mean, the title is Parrot Confidential -- a title that insinuates scandal, intrigue, or expose, no?

    Definitely a complex subject, but so far I think I'm inclined to trust my dozen-plus years with my feathered kid, who will get extra cuddles tonight as we watch the rest of the PBS doc.