It is always now... so poignant

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    Dec 06, 2013 4:14 PM GMT
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3JzcCviNDk

    WATCH THE VIDEO!

    Huge fan of Sam Harris. This video makes you question whether or not you are living your life to the fullest and being happy.

    So Im in medical school currently (term 2) and kind of debating whether or not I want to continue. Do I spend the next 10 years of my life studying my ass off, not sleeping, eating poorly, losing relationships, getting older, amassing huge debt etc. simply for a job?

    Its easy for me to say that I'm not happy here in the sense of my current resposibilities (studying, class, labs, exams, etc), but I feel like I would love the profession in the future. I love medicine and all the benefits that come with being a doctor.

    I guess I just don't know if the trade off of youth and happiness is equal to the prosperity and security the job provides in the future.

    Any advice from doctors out there?
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    Dec 06, 2013 4:40 PM GMT
    coloradojock16 saidhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3JzcCviNDk

    WATCH THE VIDEO!

    Huge fan of Sam Harris. This video makes you question whether or not you are living your life to the fullest and being happy.

    So Im in medical school currently (term 2) and kind of debating whether or not I want to continue. Do I spend the next 10 years of my life studying my ass off, not sleeping, eating poorly, losing relationships, getting older, amassing huge debt etc. simply for a job?

    Its easy for me to say that I'm not happy here in the sense of my current resposibilities (studying, class, labs, exams, etc), but I feel like I would love the profession in the future. I love medicine and all the benefits that come with being a doctor.

    I guess I just don't know if the trade off of youth and happiness is equal to the prosperity and security the job provides in the future.

    Any advice from doctors out there?


    The best "now" philosophy is Eckhart Tolle. The Power of Now and other books. It really helped me transition into phase 2 of my life as a gay man. It well help you realize that you arent really going anywhere. Life is in this very moment so you can be totally fulfilled going to med school. It will
    Never get better than now.
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    Dec 06, 2013 4:43 PM GMT
    coloradojock16 saidI guess I just don't know if the trade off of youth and happiness is equal to the prosperity and security the job provides in the future. Any advice from doctors out there?
    Thanks for the inspirational message. Life is what happens when you're doing everything, everyday. It is not in the future, as Sam says. You will be rewarded in spades for today's struggles and challenges .
  • Destinharbor

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    Dec 06, 2013 4:52 PM GMT
    I'm not a doctor or even in the profession but I have been a banker to maybe 800 doctors over the years. What I've found is they like to complain about their industry, insurance companies, hospitals, Medicare, electronic records, compensation, hours, etc. and most interestingly whether or not they'd recommend to their children to enter the profession. But most all are both rich by non-Wall St. standards and happy doing what they do. That isn't a bad combination and I take all the bitching as no different than everyone else bitching about their jobs. The profession also has great mobility so you can pick where you want to live and be sure you'll have the means to afford it. There is also great stability.. you don't really have a boss and run your own show, though many don't care for the business end of their profession. Tough road to get to the point of hanging your shingle out but pretty much smooth sailing from age 32. Not many jobs can promise that.

    Just my take from a close but detached viewpoint. The other question would be what would you do if you didn't do the doctor route? Would that give you satisfaction? Ya gotta love what you do. Though some take pleasure in being good at what they do even though it might not be their dream job.
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    Dec 06, 2013 5:03 PM GMT
    I'm no doctor but in today's economy and healthcare system to come its seems to me you can't expect prosperity and security in the medical field any longer.

    Years ago I followed the "money and security" of the engineering field and I'm bored to death and was for most of my career but I had obligations (wife and kid) to support.

    For a happier, fulfilled life follow your dreams not your wallet or security. Money and security can be snatched from you in the blink of a eye.
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    Dec 06, 2013 5:28 PM GMT
    I listened to that but I think it is missing something that is very applicable to your situation. It's easy to say you must enjoy the moment but what constitutes enjoyment. Is it building for the future or taking drugs and not caring about the future. It's nice to say don't obsess about the future but complete disregard can lead to a downward spiral. The balance is found in what I will call enjoying the journey. The journey is not always paved with happiness and whether you are enjoying it or not may be a matter of perception. Do you find studying medicine a complete bore and are only doing it for a prestigious job? If that is the case you may have chosen the wrong path. But if you chose medicine because you found it fascinating and because you want to heal people then I would say it's just a matter of changing your perception. By focusing on how interesting medicine is you will enjoy studying it more. By reminding yourself how much you want to help heal people you will enjoy each step that brings you closer to that moment. Instead you are focusing on all the work you have to do to reach your goal and the sacrifices you have to make. You are not enjoying the journey because you were thinking about the future and all you see is a lot of hard work. But if you perceived the work as exciting and fulfilling then you would find the journey far more enjoyable as well.

    One last note. I've noticed that as people get older they shrink their comfort zones. For example, while they may have found traveling exciting in the past, a few bad experiences change their perception and they tell themselves they would rather stay at home. They begin to live to avoid pain rather than seek fulfillment. This mentality leads to depression. Start now by changing your perception and you will avoid this fate.
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    Dec 06, 2013 5:55 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI'm no doctor but in today's economy and healthcare system to come its seems to me you can't expect prosperity and security in the medical field any longer.

    Years ago I followed the "money and security" of the engineering field and I'm bored to death and was for most of my career but I had obligations (wife and kid) to support.

    For a happier, fulfilled life follow your dreams not your wallet or security. Money and security can be snatched from you in the blink of a eye.


    No one should ever become a doctor just to make a lot of money. For that matter no one's career decision should be based just on money.

    I also chose a career for security and money. I did not have a family to support so I nearly sabotaged my career on a few occasions convincing myself I was doing it all wrong. I fantasized about the type of job I really wanted and was convinced it was not in the field in which I was working. Eventually I found a role within this career that turned out to be my fantasy job to a T. So you don't always need to abort your journey to make it enjoyable. Sometimes you just need to steer it in a slightly different direction.
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    Dec 06, 2013 6:25 PM GMT
    thanks for all the advice, guys icon_smile.gif its actually very helpful. Sometimes it takes hearing it from other people to realize what needs to be done.

    icon_smile.gif)
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    Dec 06, 2013 6:30 PM GMT
    Next time you meet someone who works in a call centre, in a shop or a fast food restaurant, ask them what their job is like, what the customers are like and so on. It is very hard for people without a clear path laid out like you have (especially for the last 5 years).
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    Dec 06, 2013 6:36 PM GMT
    My father would be a guy to ask about this topic. He studied hard at Rutgers and Santa Clara University and ended up one of the heads of Lockheed Martin, working directly below his friend, the CEO. The perks and money were great, but so was the horrible stress. He loved, and hated his job. He loved the part of putting rockets and satellites up, but hated the government intervention and bureaucracy. He once told me he would like to have just operated a small hardware store in a little town in the mountains somewhere instead of doing what he was doing.

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    Dec 06, 2013 9:10 PM GMT
    I heard when u die....u dont look back on ur life like "gee, golly! I wish I had worked harder at my job".... rather, they think about how they could have created better relationships for themselves. They think about how they never let themselves be happy. Perhaps because they were always working.

    Fuck medical school. You're still gonna be someone's bitch upon being a doctor. Constantly on call because some fat bitch shitted her pants cuz she has c-diff..... or some old dumbass who's blood pressure is through the roof cuz of his unhealthy lifestyle, yet u must wake up in the middle of the night to be on call.... or some alcoholic fuckface who's liver is failing and u must be there... to do whatever it is that will keep him alive.

    fuck that. Live your life. Move to Hawaii, become one with nature. Forage for ur own food and stuff like that. Take pictures. Eat, pray, Love. Namaste. lol
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    Dec 06, 2013 9:40 PM GMT
    Ohno saidNext time you meet someone who works in a call centre, in a shop or a fast food restaurant, ask them what their job is like.

    If you don't want to go through the rigors of advanced education and training you will most likely end up in jobs that don't offer much autonomy. Jobs where you simply do what others tell you to do aren't very rewarding.
    On the other hand, most professionals say that the greatest reward from their career isn't the money; It's the satisfaction you get from being free to apply your talents, skills, training and experience to do difficult things well. If the difficult things you do are also helping others, that's even more icing on the cake.
    So a few years of drudgery and sacrifice will be repaid a hundredfold in terms of the life you will lead.