sub 18 minute 5k

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 08, 2008 4:09 PM GMT
    Has anyone here run under an 18 minute 5k? How much mileage did you do.

    I ran an 18:26 5000m this Summer on the track, the afternoon of the same meet I ran a 5:03 mile so the speed's there the endurance isn't. I was running right around 30 mpw with speed sessions 1-2 times a week. According to Mcmillan running calculators I should be able to run a 17:30 which is a little under a 5:40/mile average. However, my first mile was in 5:40 and I found myself fading badly, the middle, and rallying a little the last 800m.

    This is my goal for 2009.

    Thanks.
  • reliable1

    Posts: 65

    Dec 08, 2008 10:59 PM GMT
    Not me. I'm slow. Can do the distance, but not great with speed. I have improved in speed this year, but it's still not my strong suit.

    Best of luck with your goal.
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    Dec 11, 2008 1:11 AM GMT
    Thanks reliable. At least you gave me some response haha. C'mon I know someone on here's faster than me and is willing to share their wealth of knowledge and experience.
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    Dec 11, 2008 2:31 AM GMT
    I am happy to say that I have, except it was on a treadmill - so, I'm not sure if that counts.
    5k is not much for an experienced runner like you and you should do better than your goal. My quick back-of-envelope calculations show that it is 5.58, not 5.40 so you are comfortably above that.
    My running/speed on the street is highly erratic and therefore I cannot control my energy expenditure as precisely as I can on a treadmill. If I were in your position, I would practice running the 5k on the street over and over again, preferably on the same course (the one holding the event) until you are able to highly structure your running/energy so that you can run the course while asleep. I know it is cheating a little bit, but you want to win, don't you! I don't think that your primary concern should be speed (you already have it) - just structure.
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    Dec 11, 2008 2:45 AM GMT
    On a treadmill I reckon so about a year ago I was 10 in 70 min I've cut that down to just over 50mins. So Yes i reckon I could do it especially if I were running flat maybe even at a slight incline.
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    Dec 11, 2008 2:57 AM GMT
    Not recently, but when I was 23 I ran a 5K in 16:56. I'd be lucky to run it in 26:56 today.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Dec 11, 2008 3:01 AM GMT
    you really need to post this on a running forum.

    interval training and tread mill running will help heaps.

    good luck!
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    Dec 11, 2008 3:22 AM GMT
    When I was training intensely for the 25K National Race Walk back in the 90's, I found that I did a PR for that distance, and then a few weeks afterwards did a PR for 3K (14:40 walking). I was really surprised, but it was because I was really strong because I had put in a lot of mileage. When you're training for hours on your feet for months, you get much stronger and then the short distances don't feel like much. Granted, you have to do your speed work too.

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    Dec 11, 2008 5:35 AM GMT
    Global_Citizen saidNot recently, but when I was 23 I ran a 5K in 16:56. I'd be lucky to run it in 26:56 today.


    Do you remember what kind of training you were doing when you ran the 16:56? That'd be just as useful.icon_lol.gif
  • Run4Life83

    Posts: 207

    Dec 11, 2008 5:52 AM GMT
    I've got the same goal for my next 5K on December 31st. I've been alternating mileage weekly from 60-80 and interval training once a week on longer distance weeks and twice a week during the shorter weeks. As a group we've done 200's, Yasso 800's, 12:00 tempo runs and even some 4:00 min runs on a handicap (we all need to end at the same point on the track after 4:00, but start at different spots based on our projected 5K time).

    Are you running with a group or solo?

    During my solo long runs I try to mix it up on a fartlek in the middle because like you I find my middle being the weakest part of my race, so my training speed work focuses on being the best during that part of the workout. Miles 1 and 2.1-end are run on adrenaline, so the middle is where it's more about you.

    Hope this helps, url]runnersworld.com[/url] offers some great advice for speedwork and even some pre race meals and warmups.

    Best of luck!icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 11, 2008 6:15 AM GMT
    RnrActinTech saidI've got the same goal for my next 5K on December 31st. I've been alternating mileage weekly from 60-80 and interval training once a week on longer distance weeks and twice a week during the shorter weeks. As a group we've done 200's, Yasso 800's, 12:00 tempo runs and even some 4:00 min runs on a handicap (we all need to end at the same point on the track after 4:00, but start at different spots based on our projected 5K time).

    Are you running with a group or solo?

    During my solo long runs I try to mix it up on a fartlek in the middle because like you I find my middle being the weakest part of my race, so my training speed work focuses on being the best during that part of the workout. Miles 1 and 2.1-end are run on adrenaline, so the middle is where it's more about you.

    Hope this helps, url]runnersworld.com[/url] offers some great advice for speedwork and even some pre race meals and warmups.

    Best of luck!icon_lol.gif


    That sounds like a solid training plan, I'm sure you'll kill 18 minutes. I'd be interested to hear how your race goes. I do have a couple of groups that I'll run with, but I'm not really training with them.

    So what pace is your every day mileage (on the non interval days) run at? This is where I'm having the issue...too little mileage too fast.

    Good luck!
  • Run4Life83

    Posts: 207

    Dec 23, 2008 5:06 PM GMT
    I've been running every day pace around 6:30-7:00. 6:30 when I feel fresh in the morning and 7:00 during my midday runs.
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    Dec 24, 2008 5:01 AM GMT
    Im not that fast as i am about the distance (5k pr 21 something),but im wondering what kind of cross trainig are you doing? Ive found over the years that i can hold a faster pace over the distance if im effectively weight training my lower body IE leg presses, lunges, and even sprints and agility drills such as cones and ladders. If youre doing twice daily runs, why dont you try replacing one of the two runs twice a week with a circuit weight training program with extra focus on your legs and core.

    Also on your runs, I would work with 6 to 7 mile training runs, but i would come out VERY comfortable in the first 2 to 3 miles and then Very uncomfortable for the next 3 to 4 with a cool down mile tacked on. Your body has to learn to not only accept speed but to maintain it over the distance so burning yourself up late in your training runs should accomplish this. You are trully working with elite speed so i cannot relate but i wihs you luck man.

    RS
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    Jan 04, 2009 5:43 AM GMT
    Since I ran a 17:20 5k this morning, i'm assuming you mean you are looking for a road race 5k? and not a track workout? Typically you want to work up your mileage each week so that 3.1 miles becomes your shortest run. Typically i will do mon wed fri, long slow distance (5-8 miles) (if the race was on a sunday) then tues and thurs would be speed work, otherwise known in the running world as fartlek (spelling on that one). You will want to run half mile, then sprint half mile, and so on until you reach about a 3 mile distance. Your Saturday run would be nice easy pace, usually about 4 miles.

    At least thats the way ive been doing it since hs.
  • Run4Life83

    Posts: 207

    Jan 04, 2009 9:10 PM GMT
    Paxcrunner, I think I'll try that for my 5K in February. Thanks!

    Ended up with an 18:59 on my New Year's Eve Run. icon_sad.gif Thinking I may have overtrained and went in to it tired. Adding in another day of focused speedwork for two a week and then including a little fartleking in the new plan as well as tons of miles.
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    Jan 04, 2009 9:45 PM GMT
    I had my best 3 mile road race a month or two after graduating from HS. It was about 16 minutes which made me question if the course was perhaps a bit short... but I did finish 2nd - and ahead of some of the guys on the track team who were normally ahead of me. I think I was pretty well rested and had spent the two weeks before running just 3 mile runs (and with some difficult hills).

    Running track and cross country, we generally did up to 13 miles per day during the season, maybe 3-4 in the morning and 6-10 in the afternoon.

    Good luck with it!
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    Jan 04, 2009 11:05 PM GMT
    RnrActinTech saidPaxcrunner, I think I'll try that for my 5K in February. Thanks!

    Ended up with an 18:59 on my New Year's Eve Run. icon_sad.gif Thinking I may have overtrained and went in to it tired. Adding in another day of focused speedwork for two a week and then including a little fartleking in the new plan as well as tons of miles.


    Yea, a 6:30-7:00/mile is probably way too fast at the kind of mileage you were doing. I was told do go 1:45-2:00/mile slower than my current 5k pace on my easy runs and up to 2:15/mile slower on my recovery runs. I've been running 8-8:20 while recovering from this injury and it feels like I'm slugging along. I can't wait until I'm healthy enough to add in tempos and fartleks. Once I'm ready to race again, I'll substitute intervals in for the fartleks. I was also told that for a concentration in 5ks you really shouldn't go above 50 mpw.

    Bummer, but 18:59's still a very respectable time. I bombed a race in the Spring, and I was lucky I broke 21 min (which is still a good time) just 2 minutes slower than what I usually run.
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    Jan 04, 2009 11:23 PM GMT
    My fastest 10K was 16:29 run in the midst of a decade or so from my mid 30s to mid 40s. I was a dedicated trainer and racer....running about 70 miles per week, a track workout on Thursday and a "fartlek" distance run on Tuesdays, and a race about every other Sunday.

    The races were from 5K to marathon distance.

    The first mile of a short race like the 5K should not be run slower than your overall pace. You need to find a balance between running that first mile slightly faster than your overall pace (because the adrenaline and lack of fatigue will allow you to perform a bit better then) and running it TOO fast that you will blow yourself out.

    In that PR 5K for me I ran the first mile around 7 seconds per mile faster than myoverall pace.

    Good luck.

    John