Working situation in Canada

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2013 8:46 PM GMT
    I'm planning to maybe go for a year to Canada for experience I just want to ask first people who actually lives over there how the working situation looks like? And more specified to the areas around Toronto and Vancouver.

    Any answers or ideas are more then welcome!
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3534

    Dec 13, 2013 9:28 PM GMT
    have a job before you get here and a visa to get one or you dont have a chance in any field. you can't just come and work.

    unemployment is about 7-10 percent and 30% if you are young.

    good luck with that.


    rent in both places is outrageous, and toronto plan on buying a car.

    http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/city_result.jsp?country=Canada&city=Toronto
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    Dec 14, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    Vancouver BC stands for Vancouver, Bring Cash...
  • Syphon

    Posts: 366

    Dec 14, 2013 6:35 AM GMT
    Good luck getting a job in Vancouver, Toronto isn't much better either.

    Calgary is the best option for work.
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    Dec 14, 2013 7:27 AM GMT
    Vancouver is outrageously expensive and very difficult to find work in...

    Toronto is less expensive but still not very affordable. Lots of corporate jobs in Toronto but, again, the competition is ridiculous.

    Some persistence will help though. Good luck!
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    Dec 14, 2013 2:47 PM GMT
    Oh that's really sad but anyway thnx for the answers!
  • run26

    Posts: 41

    Dec 14, 2013 3:03 PM GMT
    hi

    yes, there are challenges in relocating and getting a job in say vancouver or toronto - but relocating anywhere presents challenges, period

    if looking for the experience of relocating, did that in 1990: left toronto and relocated to vancouver. in doing it, didn't know a sole here in vancouver. packed up and move cross country. turned out to be a great thing to have done. no regrets.

    then again, i love change & challenges. some people don't like this kind of thing or they have a very low tolerance for this type of thing.

    what are you looking to do job wise? as you know, some job areas are way more of a challenge than others areas.

    be brave! make a plan. and always ask; "what's the worse that could happen?" then you are prepared for when the plan does perfectly follow through.

    cheers,
    peter
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Dec 14, 2013 3:46 PM GMT
    Since both Toronto and Vancouver are very expensive, why not check out both Montreal and Calgaryicon_question.gif If you want to be near Toronto, why not check out this one beautiful gem of a midsized Canadian city, St Catherinesicon_question.gif
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    Dec 15, 2013 9:24 PM GMT
    Toronto and Vancouver are pretty expensive places to live in. As long as you can score a good job you'll be alright here but I wouldnt recommend it for someone who is planning to live on his own. $900/mo can only get you a a shitty worn down bachelor with barely any room to move. To live in Toronto you are looking at $1600/mo and up for a decent apartment with 1-2 bedrooms without utilities. If you are commuting keep in mind that your month pass is about $126/mo. I personally recommend Montreal over Toronto, I just happened to find a really good job in Toronto and also my fiance is here but I always preferred Montreal, not only because it is cheaper but also because it is a funner place overall.

    In Montreal people seem to enjoy themselves more. In Toronto everyone is just a bunch of zombies that dont talk to each other and people here tend to segregate heavily in ethnic groups(45% of the population in Toronto is foreign born). There is a lot of diversity in Montreal but people are nowhere as secluded into their own groups, you can find people from all backgrounds hanging out together and having a good time. Montreal is also a much smaller city so if there are 5 festivals going on during summer time most likely you will be able to walk your way through each one of them which gives people the impression that there is always so much going on in the city. It is just an awesome vibe. What type of work are you aiming for?


    Calgary, is probably the best place to go if you are looking for cheap, they barely have taxes there. However, it can be a bit of a boring place. You'll make good money there tho.
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    Dec 15, 2013 9:50 PM GMT
    Isn't language a problem if you don't speak French?
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    Dec 15, 2013 10:00 PM GMT
    PaulDee saidIsn't language a problem if you don't speak French?



    Lol . No
  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Dec 15, 2013 10:02 PM GMT
    PaulDee saidIsn't language a problem if you don't speak French?


    Only in Quebec

    Mon Dieu!
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    Dec 15, 2013 10:03 PM GMT
    Montreal is definitely a better option if you don't have a job yet (Vancouver and Toronto like people said are really expensive cities).
    There is a lot of competition so it can take time to land an okay job.Definitely land a job before moving to Vancouver or Toronto!
    For Montreal, I wouldnt suggest it if you speak no words of french at all but if you do you will probably have a better time. It's definitely more fun than vancouver and Toronto, and cheaper too, but the weather is meh in winter and its super hot in summer.
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    Dec 15, 2013 11:02 PM GMT
    PaulDee saidIsn't language a problem if you don't speak French?


    In Montreal? No
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    Dec 15, 2013 11:13 PM GMT
    Language is an issue, or not, depending on the field. Survival French is worth learning so you can read signs (especially street parking signs), and say hello to a stranger.

    The quickest way to get here is to land a job in a field that is in demand, then go to the border with a job offer in hand and ask the customs officer for a 1year NAFTA work permit. You can then become a resident with a job and full medical care pretty instantly. If you want to know details, just message me.

    To become a resident without a job, but with permission to get a job anywhere that will hire you, it is best to apply while still living in the states. It takes several months. Of course, it would be wide to visit and get to know some places first before going to all that trouble.
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    Dec 15, 2013 11:31 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]
    The quickest way to get here is to land a job in a field that is in demand, then go to the border with a job offer in hand and ask the customs officer for a 1year NAFTA work permit. You can then become a resident with a job and full medical care pretty instantly. [/quote]

    I moved to Manitoba from the States three months ago. The process was quite easy for me but my profession is listed under NAFTA. Calgary was my port of entry and all I needed was my job offer and a copy of my degree to get my three-year work permit. My medical care started the day I arrived and I will be applying for permanent residency soon.
  • Jockwannabe

    Posts: 216

    Dec 16, 2013 12:29 AM GMT
    I really doubt you can find anything decent in a year if you don't have an offer before you arrive in canada. Simply put, if you are not PR it will be really hard to find a job if you are already in Canada. Furthermore it's illegal to work holding a visitor visa. It's also getting really competitive especially in Toronto even when you have relevant working experience from country of origin. Don't waste your time if it's just a year. You could try studying in Canada and apply for a job thereafter. It would be easier than coming to canada with no job offers and hoping to get a job. Just my 2 cents.
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    Dec 16, 2013 1:59 AM GMT
    My area of expertise is in IT and I did a job search for IT jobs in Vancouver and I was surprised how many there were available at different levels, sys admin, desktop support, development, networking etc.

    I guess it depends on the field you plan to work in, if its outside of IT, it might be harder I guess.
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    Dec 16, 2013 3:44 AM GMT
    There are lots of jobs in lots of fields, provided you work in one of those fields.
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    Dec 16, 2013 12:46 PM GMT
    Oh lots of good advices thanks Montreal sounds like a great option!
    Well I had french for 4 years in school but don't remember to much only basic stuff. Visa isn't a problem as I can get a work and travel visa which allow to work and earn money.

    The experience is more for develop my english and see the country. Work is more to finance my time in Canada and of course get experience also.

    I'm not that picky when it comes to what kind of work I've expereince from working with horses(professional), moving company, hotel and restaurant(fine dining)

    If someone knows how to find hotel work(internet) let me know! Planing to do hotel management studies so in that way it would be great if I could get some hotel experience at same time as I improve my English!

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    Dec 16, 2013 10:35 PM GMT
    This hotel school near my house might be able to help you in that area.
    http://www.ithq.qc.ca/en/school/

    This organization helps people find jobs and start small businesses.
    http://www.yesmontreal.ca/yes.php
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    Dec 18, 2013 7:36 PM GMT
    This may be of interest:

    http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/11/25/toronto_named_youthful_city_of_the_year_edging_out_berlin_and_new_york.html

    Based on data from 25 cities around the world, YouthfulCities, an organization that aids youth in building better cities, created 16 categories, including civic participation, diversity, safety and mental health, food and nightlife and more.

    Toronto edged out Berlin and New York City, in second and third place respectively.

    Robert Barnard, co-founder of YouthfulCities, explained that the rankings are fed by dozens of indicators in 16 categories, grouped into three broad sections — Live, Work and Play.

    Barnard said YouthfulCities conducted a survey of approximately 2,000 youth in March and April to create categories for ranking the cities and measure the importance of those categories to youth. Afterward, the organization collected information corresponding to each category — their methods combine statistical data as well as short surveys by “Urban Decoders,” a moniker for their local data collectors across the globe.

    The index includes prominent cities such as London, Rome and Tokyo, as well as locales such as Bogota (Colombia), Lagos (Nigeria) and Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo). According to the index, Toronto scores amongst the top five in nine out of the 16 categories.


    Also - assuming you're Swedish or have a passport from another country that qualifies, you can ignore a lot of the visa advice on this thread and just read through:

    http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/sweden-suede/experience_canada_experience/index.aspx

    International Experience Canada enables Swedish citizens between the ages of 18 and 30 to:

    stay in Canada for longer than 6 months;
    legally work in Canada;
    experience another culture.


    There are plenty of jobs in Toronto - it just boils down to what you're willing to do/want to do. The good thing is that the online job market is pretty developed in North America so you can look up places like:

    http://ca.indeed.com/Tourism-jobs-in-Toronto,-ON
    http://ca.indeed.com/Hospitality-jobs-in-Toronto,-ON

    I'd also suggest looking into people you can meet/relate to to get leads on jobs:

    http://www.swedenabroad.com/en-GB/Embassies/Ottawa/Contact/Swedish--Scandinavian-Organizations-/
    http://theswedelifeintoronto.com/swedish-directory-in-toronto/find-the-swedes/