Christmas for non Christians

  • gooddude1583

    Posts: 100

    Dec 22, 2013 1:56 AM GMT
    So I have been in the US for several years now but this is the first year I don't travel overseas, home for the holidays. In fact I plan to work on my research most of the time. As I told different people about it, they would all say how sad it is and such, and I am just puzzled. I'm a non religious Jew, and Christmas holds no significance for me. And so I was just wondering what do you all non christian do for Christmas? Are there any traditions for those of you who don't celebrate it?

    Either way, Marry Christmas and happy holidays to you all!
  • jo2hotbod

    Posts: 3603

    Dec 22, 2013 2:49 AM GMT
    For those who don't celebrate it's just another normal day, just like any other holiday not celebrated by others. I've never heard of any non believers traditions except for Festivous
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Dec 22, 2013 3:23 AM GMT
    I've always had Jewish friends who celebrated Christmas in one way or another.
    And, I'm atheist.
    Christmas is a good opportunity to spend time with friends.

    It doesn't have to be a religious celebration.
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    Dec 22, 2013 3:34 AM GMT
    Pretty sure there's a TON load of Non-Christians that celebrate Christmas (in one way or the other) every year.
    It's more of a fun get together and reason to party for many people, than celebrating the birth of Christ.
    Tis the season to enjoy. No reason to take it so literal.
    It's not like the Christians Own the holiday and you're not invited. Do with it as you wish.
    I celebrate the hell out it myself...
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    Dec 22, 2013 4:05 AM GMT
    I'm nonreligious but recognize Christmas as the cultural phenomena it is.
    I get into the fun that comes with the orgy of excess.
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    Dec 22, 2013 4:38 AM GMT
    Once I threw a Christmas dinner, in NYC.

    The Jews all left to go to Midnight Mass.

    The Gentiles all stayed and partied.
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    Dec 22, 2013 12:21 PM GMT
    Being a non christian, I don't celebrate it either.
    Although,I am going on Dinner with my friends on 24th.
    What irritates me is when someone gets puzzled or start feeling sorry for you, when I tell them that I don't celebrate Christmas.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3534

    Dec 22, 2013 3:03 PM GMT
    I thought they called it chinese food and movie day
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    Dec 22, 2013 3:12 PM GMT
    Aristoshark saidThe tradition for Jews is to go to the movies and then to a Chinese restaurant afterwards. It's actually in the Talmud.


    It's so sad I learned the Chinese place celebrates Christmas, but they work on Christmas. What is this nation coming to. Soon we will all be working 7 days a week.
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    Dec 22, 2013 3:32 PM GMT
    Aristoshark saidThe tradition for Jews is to go to the movies and then to a Chinese restaurant afterwards. It's actually in the Talmud.

    We have been doing this for years, and if you publicizing this ruins our tradition of being able to enjoy movies without loud mouth idiots talking and texting during movies because they are home opening presents and hating one another, I swear I will cry over my General Tso's and hot and sour soup.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Dec 22, 2013 3:37 PM GMT
    "Christmas" is NOT a Christian Holiday.

    I know, it is confusing as fuck, thanks to the Roman Catholic Church.

    The winter Solstice is a pagan holiday that has been celebrated in a variety of ways by various northern hemisphere sun-god religions throughout history.

    The actual solstice occurs around December 21st. However, to anyone marking the location of the sun rise and set on the horizon from the perspective of a given spot, the sun doesn't begin to "return," that is, make its return journey northward, until December 25th. In other words, from that location the sun appears to rise and set at the same spots (more or less) for three consecutive days. On the forth, December 25th, it "rises" (as if from the dead) and is born (or re-born) for its journey northward.

    January 1st is when the day's begin to become longer. (Due to the axis tilt of the Earth, there is a slight discrepancy between location of sun rise / set on the horizon and actual length of day.)

    Anyway, the point is, these celestial events have been noted and recorded by humans for tens of thousands of years. Back in the "old days" 'science' and 'religion' weren't two separate classes of thought, they were identical. The sun was a god, an omnipotent being, about whom great tales were told -- it's annual journey of death and rebirth being one of them.

    There is absolutely nothing in the Christian New Testament which indicates *when* baby Jesus was born, much less anything which says His birthday should be celebrated. It *does* say He is the "son of God". Somewhere along the way the early Catholic Church decided to sort of tie together the tale of Jesus's birth and resurrection with the Solar god traditions. SO… we got Christmas (winter solstice) and Easter (spring equinox).

    Hope that helps.
  • hanzo83

    Posts: 457

    Dec 23, 2013 2:10 AM GMT
    I was raised to be a christian but as I started looking for answers I found them and I'm not a christian anymore. Xmas for me used to be mostly about getting and giving gifts but all of that magic started to die when I became a teenager lol. At 30 I don't even like Christmas or New Year's anymore. I just carry on like it's a regular day on christmas.
  • Cutlass

    Posts: 426

    Dec 23, 2013 9:43 AM GMT
    I'm an agnostic, but I celebrate it because it's a time to eat lots of good food, meet relatives whom I haven't seen for a long time, enjoy the friendship and camaraderie of everyone, and just feel relaxed and joyful. I don't think about the religious aspect of Christmas, but I'm aware of it. I give gifts, and I enjoy the decorations, but I just think of it as an annual holiday I partake of, and it's just a party for me and nothing else.