A good starter book on psychology?

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    Dec 23, 2013 9:12 PM GMT
    Hey guys! I'm going to a beach this friday where there is no tv no internet no nothing. And I've been trying to find a good starter book on psychology to read. It has been a subject I've always been interested in. So, any recommendations? icon_smile.gif

    Thanks!
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    Dec 23, 2013 9:20 PM GMT
    Not to be insulting (because I have quite a few of these)...
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    Dec 23, 2013 9:51 PM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidNot to be insulting (because I have quite a few of these)...
    %7B7975D576-78F1-46EC-BCC8-55C191F5FFAA%


    Hahaha, well that could be an option. Thanks ! icon_smile.gif

    Something else?
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    Dec 23, 2013 10:21 PM GMT
    Yeah, the Dummies books are often quite good and readable. I've read a few; the last one was on European history.
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    Dec 24, 2013 12:39 AM GMT
    Read any of the big boys. William James or Carl Jung are among my favorite thinkers.

    Or you could get into it through some fiction which might not be necessarily instructive but certainly illustrative of principals of psychology, the real heady stuff like the works of Henry James, Borges, Marquez, et al.
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    Dec 24, 2013 12:44 AM GMT
    Along these lines; has anyone read Dr Phil's book? The premise is interesting.
    http://www.drphil.com/shows/page/LifeCodeBook/
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    Dec 24, 2013 1:19 AM GMT
    theantijock saidRead any of the big boys. William James or Carl Jung are among my favorite thinkers.

    Or you could get into it through some fiction which might not be necessarily instructive but certainly illustrative of principals of psychology, the real heady stuff like the works of Henry James, Borges, Marquez, et al.


    But aren't James and Jung a bit outdated already?
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    Dec 24, 2013 1:36 AM GMT
    Marsu said
    theantijock saidRead any of the big boys. William James or Carl Jung are among my favorite thinkers.

    Or you could get into it through some fiction which might not be necessarily instructive but certainly illustrative of principals of psychology, the real heady stuff like the works of Henry James, Borges, Marquez, et al.


    But aren't James and Jung a bit outdated already?


    Well, yeah, but so's Confucius and Laozi.

    Thinkers who transcended their generations generally also transcend ours.

    Is there new info, has some stuff been tweaked? Well in some cases, maybe so. But you'll rarely get better information than by going to the source.

    Also, reading them will show you not so much what to think, but how thinking is done.

    Otherwise what you're getting is translations (and when you work with those, find someone reputable who doesn't just understand the language but also the topic, how the language should be applied) and interpretations (most of which are prejudiced crap) and colorings (so unavoidable) and embellishments, etc.

    So go back as far as you can into the thinking of the thing and then contemporize it yourself so that when you read the more current stuff, you'll be better able to pick out the bullshit even where some of the information might be quite good. Especially because so much of what's out there today is written to sell, not to enlighten.

    Either that or maybe you could check out what books some early psych college level class is using so you get the real stuff, not the for sale stuff.
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    Dec 24, 2013 2:06 AM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidNot to be insulting (because I have quite a few of these)...
    %7B7975D576-78F1-46EC-BCC8-55C191F5FFAA%


    I read an earlier edition of Psychology for Dummies in Middle School. Psychology isn't an exact science and since we don't do human experiments I think advancements have been slow. Personally I think instead of euthanasia for the death penalty we should find humane ways to use those that have commited terrible acts to further our understanding of the human brain -- although down the line this could cause a conflict of interest, not to mention it would cause a huge debate on ethics.

    Currently MRIs can detect depression if the subject doesn't have any other issues. BUT this apparently doesn't tell us enough information in regards to treatment methods. Just as a side note I know so many people that have psychology degrees and it hasn't helped their career i.e. a personal trainer, a dance owner/teacher, and a librarian. The only way you can truly work in psych is if you have a graduate degree preferably a doctorate or PsyD.
  • 1blind_dog

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    Dec 24, 2013 3:29 AM GMT
    Psych 101. Buy a used textbook online
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    Dec 24, 2013 4:10 AM GMT
    1blind_dog saidPsych 101. Buy a used textbook online


    It's a boring read (cover to cover) -- unless you have specific topics that you want to read up on. Just take an intro to psychology class, but for the beach I think you'd be bored with an intro to psych book.
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    Dec 24, 2013 4:13 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said51y66wverBL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopR


    Although Freud is still very important to the field of psychology a lot of his ideas aren't used by modern day therapists/psychologists.