ARMS.

  • dustinj4mes

    Posts: 29

    Jan 03, 2014 2:07 AM GMT
    I know this may be an amateur question, but I'll ask it anyway. for the past couple of weeks I've been working out my arms until I can't do anything with them any longer. They swell up and get tight and all that good stuff, but the next day they don't feel sore hardly at all. Should I switch it up? I've even been adding weight and I make sure to get plenty of protein, also. I just kind of like feeling sore so I know I did something right. I've been lifting weights for years but was never serious about bulking up until recently.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Jan 03, 2014 2:17 AM GMT
    dustinj4mes saidI know this may be an amateur question, but I'll ask it anyway. for the past couple of weeks I've been working out my arms until I can't do anything with them any longer. They swell up and get tight and all that good stuff, but the next day they don't feel sore hardly at all. Should I switch it up? I've even been adding weight and I make sure to get plenty of protein, also. I just kind of like feeling sore so I know I did something right. I've been lifting weights for years but was never serious about bulking up until recently.


    Delayed onset muscle soreness (feeling sore the next day) is not an indicator of progress. Increased muscle size and strength are the only good indicators.

    re: "getting serious about bulking up,": How much are you focusing on your arms? Big compound lifts should be the focus if you are trying to get bigger. I tack on some arms stuff to my other days but barely focus on them myself.
  • dustinj4mes

    Posts: 29

    Jan 03, 2014 2:21 AM GMT
    Thanks. I just notice that my chest and abs are usually always sore the day after I work them out, without fail. I was just curious why my arms didn't feel the same way. I have noticed some increase in size, though, so I guess I'm doing something right.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 03, 2014 3:27 AM GMT
    The body likes to be shaken up! Work hard one day ... rest ... then go for lighter weights and higher reps.

    Then try different exercises that target your biceps, abs, quads, whatever.

    Just keep your body guessing.

    Tommy
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jan 03, 2014 3:37 PM GMT
    Honestly...Arm soreness doesn't mean shit...We're all different..Continue what you're doing and be patient.
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    Jan 03, 2014 5:44 PM GMT
    UFJocknerd said
    dustinj4mes saidI know this may be an amateur question, but I'll ask it anyway. for the past couple of weeks I've been working out my arms until I can't do anything with them any longer. They swell up and get tight and all that good stuff, but the next day they don't feel sore hardly at all. Should I switch it up? I've even been adding weight and I make sure to get plenty of protein, also. I just kind of like feeling sore so I know I did something right. I've been lifting weights for years but was never serious about bulking up until recently.


    Delayed onset muscle soreness (feeling sore the next day) is not an indicator of progress. Increased muscle size and strength are the only good indicators.

    re: "getting serious about bulking up,": How much are you focusing on your arms? Big compound lifts should be the focus if you are trying to get bigger. I tack on some arms stuff to my other days but barely focus on them myself.


    I'm afraid this author doesn't understand the nature of hypertrophy. Google and study hypertrophy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 03, 2014 5:46 PM GMT
    dustinj4mes saidThanks. I just notice that my chest and abs are usually always sore the day after I work them out, without fail. I was just curious why my arms didn't feel the same way. I have noticed some increase in size, though, so I guess I'm doing something right.


    DOMS is micro tears in the muscle fibers. You can google on muscle fiber and DOMS and understand this mechanism more fully.

    DOMS can indicate progress, but, in well trained individuals, it happens much less frequently.

    Being too sore, too often, is really over training, and counter productive.

    Weight training is very intensive. Routinely training to failure, without additional androgen, can, and often does, tend to be counter productive and leads to over training.

    Study sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. DOMS is NOT a requirement.