Foot pain after sprints: how can I prevent it?

  • Content

    Posts: 6

    Jan 03, 2014 7:20 PM GMT
    My trainer has got me on the benefits of sprinting for fat loss. I've never sprinted in my life. I do warm-ups but somehow after every sprint I have some kind of foot pain which leaves me unable to do sprints for at least a week.Its not so severe that I can't walk or exercise calves for example, just a kind of slight twist/stretch pain at night, sometimes at the ankle/bridge of my foot as well. Is this just because my feet are not used to the angle of sprinting? Have others had the same experience when they start sprinting.This is only about my 3/4th week and just trying to focus on the technique at the moment. Thanks!
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    Jan 03, 2014 8:48 PM GMT
    It could be the shoes you're wearing.
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    Jan 03, 2014 9:16 PM GMT
    How long have you been running? If for less than a year perhaps just do distance running for several months more before doing sprinting.

    How many sprinting spurts are you doing? Perhaps reduce the number and build up when there's no pain afterwards.

    Are you doing sprints along with your regular runs? I.e., fartleks, or separately? If separately, perhaps incorporate them into your regular runs; a few at the end (or middle, whatever), for example, and increase as in the previous paragraph.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Jan 03, 2014 9:41 PM GMT
    Good advice above and worth investigating further.

    As you say you`ve only been sprinting three or four weeks, maybe your body`s not yet adjusted to it. If you`re very active physically already, it may be too much to start with. Try reducing the amount you do to see how things go.

    Discuss the problem with your trainer.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jan 04, 2014 12:43 AM GMT
    Sprinting for fat loss? Distance running would seem to be more effective for fat loss. A sprint is brief and one cannot burn many calories during a brief run.
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    Jan 04, 2014 2:03 AM GMT
    As noted already, it's the shoes and/or lack of practise/mobility. Go find some grass, take your shoes off and do your sprints. If you still get the pain then you know you need to build up to it more slowly, hold yourself back a bit, or run longer intervals.
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    Jan 04, 2014 2:24 AM GMT
    HTTP ADDRESS GOES HERE
    FRE0 saidSprinting for fat loss? Distance running would seem to be more effective for fat loss. A sprint is brief and one cannot burn many calories during a brief run.


    Actually, interval training has been proven to be more effective for weight loss than steady state cardio training. That's one of the reasons the stationary equipment at the gym has interval training programs available.

    The above responders are right. Talk to your trainer about the foot pain, but also check if it's your shoes. Consider talking to a medical professional, too - you want to figure this out before it becomes so debilitating that you can't walk. Ask your trainer if you can temporarily do some or all of the intervals on a bike, elliptical, or arc trainer.

    http://www.myfitbodylife.com/for-fat-loss-sprinting-is-better-than-jogging/
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    Jan 04, 2014 2:37 AM GMT
    Stop sprinting.
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    Jan 04, 2014 6:21 AM GMT
    Fire your trainer. I would never recommend sprinting for anyone that has never done any sort of running in the past. Sprinting stresses your bones and joints pretty hard. It's pretty easy to sprain something or possibly develop a stress fracture.
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    Jan 04, 2014 6:48 AM GMT
    xrichx saidFire your trainer. I would never recommend sprinting for anyone that has never done any sort of running in the past. Sprinting stresses your bones and joints pretty hard. It's pretty easy to sprain something or possibly develop a stress fracture.

    To tell the truth I was thinking the same thing.

    If I were doing sprints I'd do just one burst of sprinting for a short period of time and no more. After doing that for a few weeks then add another one a few minutes after the first one, after I'd recovered from the first one. And I'd do them halfway or 3/4s of the way through my regular run.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jan 04, 2014 7:16 AM GMT
    What I know about this sort of thing you could pour in a thimble and still have room for a drink. Still, it sounds like you are having problems because of lack of conditioning, poor shoes, bad form or a similar cause. What little I have of common sense tells me that your trainer is pushing you way too hard. Get another trainer and check references in advance, including the amount of experience they have in working with guys like you.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jan 04, 2014 7:49 AM GMT
    runnerjc saidHTTP ADDRESS GOES HERE
    FRE0 saidSprinting for fat loss? Distance running would seem to be more effective for fat loss. A sprint is brief and one cannot burn many calories during a brief run.


    Actually, interval training has been proven to be more effective for weight loss than steady state cardio training. That's one of the reasons the stationary equipment at the gym has interval training programs available.

    The above responders are right. Talk to your trainer about the foot pain, but also check if it's your shoes. Consider talking to a medical professional, too - you want to figure this out before it becomes so debilitating that you can't walk. Ask your trainer if you can temporarily do some or all of the intervals on a bike, elliptical, or arc trainer.

    http://www.myfitbodylife.com/for-fat-loss-sprinting-is-better-than-jogging/


    I would not accept the results of the study unless I had carefully reviewed it myself, including the theory behind it. Also, a study should be treated with skepticism unless the results have been reproduced by other studies conducted by reputable organizations. Quite often there are studies which produce startling results which cannot be reproduced.

    I used to run intervals about once per week and run distances from 6 to 10 miles also. However, I've never had any reason to lose weight since I've never been too heavy. If persistent significant pain results from any kind of running, one should reduce the mileage and intensity and if it still persists, do some other aerobic exercise instead until the problem goes away. If the pain is only minor, it can be ignored unless it becomes worse.
  • Content

    Posts: 6

    Jan 04, 2014 7:09 PM GMT
    Thanks to everyone for the responses. I have been doing high intensity intervals on the treadmill for many years, but just about 20 mins once or twice a week, but I'm new to sprinting. I suspect as many of you suggest that its shoes and I will try bare feet and take it easy...I'm only only slowly starting out with 10 sprints of 50 metres...and at least today the pain seems to be gone after I iced it a bit yesterday.
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    Jan 14, 2014 8:22 PM GMT
    Make sure you are icing regardless of severity of the pain every night. 10 minutes on 10 minutes off 2-3 times. Also shoes make everything. If you are a heavy pronator (feet fall internally) like myself, as a sprinter, I am always in dire need of the proper shoe. My favourite shoes would be from Mizuno. But it's best to go have your feet properly sized and checked out at legitimate running store. They may recommend a more expensive brand, but when it comes to shoes and your body, the price often reflects the quality. Good luck with your training!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jan 15, 2014 12:21 AM GMT
    Content saidThanks to everyone for the responses. I have been doing high intensity intervals on the treadmill for many years, but just about 20 mins once or twice a week, but I'm new to sprinting. I suspect as many of you suggest that its shoes and I will try bare feet and take it easy...I'm only only slowly starting out with 10 sprints of 50 metres...and at least today the pain seems to be gone after I iced it a bit yesterday.


    Bare feet could help, but only if you are running on a surface suitable for bare feet. It could also make things worse. Cautiously try it and see what happens.