help and advice on losing weight in a tricky situation

  • marcthomas

    Posts: 5

    Jan 08, 2014 4:06 PM GMT
    hi guys


    2 years ago i had an accident that i don't wish to go into and have to use a walking stick to aid me in walking, this limits my exercise as i cant walk to far i can do sit ups press ups etc

    over the last year i have gone from 10 stone and a half to 13 stone 11 1/4 i know I'm am goin to get fatter and and put more weight on if i carry on the way i am none of my clothes fit me anymore and I'm going into a downward spiral, i have tried diets but none seem to lose me more than a few pounds and soon as i stop i put on double what i weighted before the diet would like to know what i can eat or take to help lose some of the weight while I'm in physio and trying to get better and maybe lose a couple of waist sizes and a bit of my belly flab thats occurred
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Jan 08, 2014 5:10 PM GMT
    Pick your target weight, get a trained dietician to outline a maintenance diet for that weight, establish that as your routine from which you do not cheat, and stay with it forever. Do NOT go on a weight loss diet that isn't sustainable. Do not feel the diet cannot change, or the foods you eat not vary, just the total intake and the composition of that intake measured in calories, carbs, fats, and proteins. Include a cheat meal each week that releases the pressure on the rest of the week but isn't horribly bad. Any diet that isn't a recreation of a normal, sensible, sustainable meal plan is doomed to failure. Avoid the fashionable stuff like six mini meals per day. You won't stick with it.
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Jan 08, 2014 5:12 PM GMT
    talk to a personal trainer, or physical therapist.
    They would do more in your situation than all of us together man.
    seriously!
  • marcthomas

    Posts: 5

    Jan 08, 2014 6:00 PM GMT
    I've taken to eating 6 little meals a day special k for breakfast or special k porridge an apple or banana a bit later, eggs on one slice of wholemeal bread no butter for lunch a piece of fruit for afternoon snacks a bit later a little natural yoghurt
    and dinners varying from pork chops, steamed chicken, a piece of fish all with fresh veg thats steamed
    once a week noodles with steamed chicken, and yet i don't seem to lose any weight

    drinks i have changed form full fat milk to semi skimmed milk i have stopped having 2 sugars and have 1 candrell in my coffee i drink about 2 coffee a day i drink also lots of water, fresh orange juice, and also i take one juice of vitamin c tablet and water a day as well but still nothing happens to lose weight

    a personal trainer is well out of the question because of my illness i cant work and struggle to live on what the government provide me with as it is without an expense of a personal trainer i looked and in manchester they just cost wayyyyyyy to much for my budget


  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jan 08, 2014 6:54 PM GMT
    Losing fat is at least 80% diet. Exercise certainly helps but it is a minor factor.

    It is always questionable to suggest anything to someone not knowing their full medical history, body type (genetics) and dietary habits.

    The problem is, our culture has us relating to food emotionally rather than as fuel for our daily activities. We often eat out of habit rather than necessity. The baseline is excess calories not used by the body as fuel for daily activities are stored as fat. To eliminate fat stores, one has to consume fewer calories than one needs so the body begins to use the stored fat as energy.

    So, if you are serious about loosing fat, you have to figure out how many calories your body needs on a daily basis. Then you need to consume fewer calories--over the long term*--than your body needs. Google BMI and other means for calculating this. Again, for emphasis, whatever number of calories your body needs, over time, you must consume FEWER than that number.

    However, not all food sources of calories are handled alike by the body. Some are more prone to being stored as fat than others. This is particularly true of sugars and foods such as most fruits and starches that the body quickly turns into sugars. It also depends in part on one's activity level and the time at which they are consumed. For example, if you were a runner or able to do other fast-past aerobic activity, you might want to consume a fruit juice to fuel that activity. On the other hand, if you're going to be sitting at a computer or about to fall asleep, unless your metabolism is quite high, the excess calories from that same drink will be stored as fat.

    To fully understand this, you need to research the Glycemic Index of the foods you are consuming and take into consideration *when* you are consuming them. A high GI breakfast may be acceptable and maybe a fairly high GI snack later in the day (depending on what you are doing), but before retiring at night is the worst time (given your goal).

    An overall strategy that may work is:
    1) eliminate all sugars from your diet.
    2) eliminate all processed and packaged foods from your diet (as almost all of them contain sugars disguised as something else).
    3) eliminate most starches (especially all gluten containing starches).
    4) use dairy sparingly.
    5) fruit should only be consumed whole (not juiced) and even then preferably only at times of the day when you will be using the energy they provide.
    6) eat plenty of greens and cruciferous vegetables
    7) eat some low GI starches (such as sweet potatoes) in moderation.
    8 ) eat good sources of protein but be cautious of the amount of fat they contain. (our bodies do require some good fats so do not attempt to eliminate all fats from your diet).
    9) you may want to supplement your diet with good quality fish oil.

    *Over the long haul, consume fewer calories than your body needs until you reach your target weight. This can be done by consuming fewer calories on a daily basis or, alternatively (for example), choosing to fast one or two days a week. IOW, you would consume your appropriate calories on all feeding days but, due to not eating for 24 to 48 hours a week, consume fewer calories over a week's time.

    Once you reach your target weight, modify your diet so you can maintain that weight.

    The problem with ALL the above is that unless we begin to relate to food as fuel (rather than comfort), none of it will work. Without this change in our understanding of food and how we relate to eating, we will inevitably stall or, worse, reverse our fat loss. So, although 80% of fat loss is diet, I would say that 90% of diet is psychology.

    As someone who struggles with this issue, I hope this helps.





  • marcthomas

    Posts: 5

    Jan 08, 2014 9:07 PM GMT
    MikeW saidLosing fat is at least 80% diet. Exercise certainly helps but it is a minor factor.

    It is always questionable to suggest anything to someone not knowing their full medical history, body type (genetics) and dietary habits.

    The problem is, our culture has us relating to food emotionally rather than as fuel for our daily activities. We often eat out of habit rather than necessity. The baseline is excess calories not used by the body as fuel for daily activities are stored as fat. To eliminate fat stores, one has to consume fewer calories than one needs so the body begins to use the stored fat as energy.

    So, if you are serious about loosing fat, you have to figure out how many calories your body needs on a daily basis. Then you need to consume fewer calories--over the long term*--than your body needs. Google BMI and other means for calculating this. Again, for emphasis, whatever number of calories your body needs, over time, you must consume FEWER than that number.

    However, not all food sources of calories are handled alike by the body. Some are more prone to being stored as fat than others. This is particularly true of sugars and foods such as most fruits and starches that the body quickly turns into sugars. It also depends in part on one's activity level and the time at which they are consumed. For example, if you were a runner or able to do other fast-past aerobic activity, you might want to consume a fruit juice to fuel that activity. On the other hand, if you're going to be sitting at a computer or about to fall asleep, unless your metabolism is quite high, the excess calories from that same drink will be stored as fat.

    To fully understand this, you need to research the Glycemic Index of the foods you are consuming and take into consideration *when* you are consuming them. A high GI breakfast may be acceptable and maybe a fairly high GI snack later in the day (depending on what you are doing), but before retiring at night is the worst time (given your goal).

    An overall strategy that may work is:
    1) eliminate all sugars from your diet.
    2) eliminate all processed and packaged foods from your diet (as almost all of them contain sugars disguised as something else).
    3) eliminate most starches (especially all gluten containing starches).
    4) use dairy sparingly.
    5) fruit should only be consumed whole (not juiced) and even then preferably only at times of the day when you will be using the energy they provide.
    6) eat plenty of greens and cruciferous vegetables
    7) eat some low GI starches (such as sweet potatoes) in moderation.
    8 ) eat good sources of protein but be cautious of the amount of fat they contain. (our bodies do require some good fats so do not attempt to eliminate all fats from your diet).
    9) you may want to supplement your diet with good quality fish oil.

    *Over the long haul, consume fewer calories than your body needs until you reach your target weight. This can be done by consuming fewer calories on a daily basis or, alternatively (for example), choosing to fast one or two days a week. IOW, you would consume your appropriate calories on all feeding days but, due to not eating for 24 to 48 hours a week, consume fewer calories over a week's time.

    Once you reach your target weight, modify your diet so you can maintain that weight.

    The problem with ALL the above is that unless we begin to relate to food as fuel (rather than comfort), none of it will work. Without this change in our understanding of food and how we relate to eating, we will inevitably stall or, worse, reverse our fat loss. So, although 80% of fat loss is diet, I would say that 90% of diet is psychology.

    As someone who struggles with this issue, I hope this helps.









    a lot of what you said made sense some didn't i have just used a bmi calculator on the nhs website and results are body mass index 28.5 overweight, recommended daily calorie intake should be between 1773-2280 kcal
    im a bit thick when it comes to food i can never work out how many calories something contains i always just look at labels and make sure carbs are low and fat is low

    with your overall diet thing a few questions

    An overall strategy that may work is:
    1) eliminate all sugars from your diet. (even low Sweetener? i take half a canderel in a large mug of coffee twice a day
    2) eliminate all processed and packaged foods from your diet (as almost all of them contain sugars disguised as something else). i have done this apart from ons eateing secial k for breakfast
    3) eliminate most starches (especially all gluten containing starches). what is a starch apart from potatoes
    4) use dairy sparingly. the only dairy have is a minimal amount in my tea or coffee and in my breakfast
    5) fruit should only be consumed whole (not juiced) and even then preferably only at times of the day when you will be using the energy they provide. i eat an apple about 11am and a banana orange or apple at about 3-4pm
    6) eat plenty of greens and cruciferous vegetables every dinner i have is chicken/chops etc and i always have them with spinach broad beans sweetcorn, cabbage, or broccoli and have 2 veg
    7) eat some low GI starches (such as sweet potatoes) in moderation.
    8 ) eat good sources of protein but be cautious of the amount of fat they contain. (our bodies do require some good fats so do not attempt to eliminate all fats from your diet). what is a good source of protein?
    9) you may want to supplement your diet with good quality fish oil. can you recommend one?


    i really appreciate your help with this as well it means a lot I'm going very depressed because of my weight gain and just ant to make myself better
  • seafrontbloke

    Posts: 300

    Jan 08, 2014 11:01 PM GMT
    Hi, I know that any way forward is going to be difficult for you. Have you spoken to your GP about this? Some can prescribe PT or gym sessions, I would have thought that might be an option for you. Or, if you want to go down the route of dietary control maybe membership of, say, Slimming World might be an option, again, doctors can prescribe this.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jan 09, 2014 2:11 AM GMT
    marcthomas saida lot of what you said made sense some didn't ...

    I don't have time to answer all your questions. Search on keywords and you'll find most of your answers.

    For example STARCH: http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000007000000000000000.html

    GLUTEN: http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/gluten-food-list

    CALORIES: http://www.calorieking.com/foods/

    FISH OIL (Google: "fish oil supplements" and research within that.) I buy mine in bulk from www.purebulk.com (this is US so you can probably find better quality and cheaper European).

    For a sugar substitute I recommend liquid Stevia. Just a few drops is all it takes. I use NOW "Better Stevia Original".

    PROTEIN: Meat, poultry, fish, eggs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 09, 2014 5:26 AM GMT
    How about you start swimming once a week and see if that helps.Ry
  • marcthomas

    Posts: 5

    Jan 09, 2014 9:13 AM GMT
    WickedRyan saidHow about you start swimming once a week and see if that helps.Ry



    hi ryan

    i cannot swim due to my disability i have never been able to swim and now is not the right time to start i only have the use of one arm and part use of one leg it would be a very large task to learn to swim


    and MikeW thanks its given me pause for thought and something to look towards
  • marcthomas

    Posts: 5

    Jan 09, 2014 2:25 PM GMT
    ok so I've downloaded an app which I've put all my details in and its told me my calorie and fat intake for the day at minimum is i want to lose weight and everything you eat / drink you scan the bar code or enter the name into the app and it deducts them daily off your daily intake allowed so starting it on saturday icon_biggrin.gif


    wish me luck i will let you guys know how i get on