Pancakes

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    Jan 15, 2014 4:33 PM GMT
    I had a yen for pancakes last Sunday morning and had no mix. I usually use the kind you just add water to or Bisquick, which I love. I went online and found this recipe for Fluffy Pancakes but I had no white vinegar.

    [url]http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Fluffy-Pancakes-2/Detail.aspx?event8=1&prop24=SR_Thumb&e11=pancakes&e8=Quick%20Search&event10=1[/url]

    So I made this one, Grandad's Pancakes

    [url]http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Grandads-Pancakes/Detail.aspx?event8=1&prop24=SR_Thumb&e11=pancakes&e8=Quick%20Search&event10=1[/url]

    Delicious! I'm not going back to boxed mixes again. And I'm going to get some white vinegar to try the other one.

    (not sure why you can't url these recipes??)

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    Jan 15, 2014 5:07 PM GMT
    Could be the linebreaks/newlines/carriage returns that screw up the urls.

    Now that you've discovered how easy it is to make them from scratch try using whole wheat flour. You'll need a bit more baking powder. And they'll be heavier regardless. Try adding spices like 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon.
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Jan 15, 2014 7:17 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said Try adding spices like 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon.


    i like those tiny wild blueberries in mine.
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    Jan 16, 2014 4:22 AM GMT
    Draper said

    And I'm going to get some white vinegar to try the other one.




    Any acid would work, such as lemon juice.
  • buffdude

    Posts: 97

    Feb 06, 2014 6:07 AM GMT
    I bought some wheat flour. Any suggestions on how to make a pancake that is healthy and taste good without any sugar or a stick of butter?
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    Feb 06, 2014 6:45 AM GMT
    You could look for recipes that use vegetable oil instead of butter, and honey instead of sugar.

    But how are you going to serve them? I like mine soaking in honey or maple syrup. Any jam or preserves is likely to have lots of sugar in it.

    Check the kingarthur.com site.

    Of course, I haven't had any pancakes in decades.

    How about these?

    http://goo.gl/OKMHkm
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    Feb 06, 2014 8:08 AM GMT
    Also look for recipes that use applesauce. With applesauce as a replacement for sugar. Look at the treetop.com web site for suggestions.
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    Feb 06, 2014 3:02 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    Lumpyoatmeal said Try adding spices like 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon.


    i like those tiny wild blueberries in mine.


    Yes! Or finely chopped apples. I tried the Fluffy ones but I like Grandad's better.

    Grandad's Pancakes

    "This secret family pancake recipe was passed down from my grandfather. He fed a family of 7 (including 4 growing boys!) on these pancakes, and refused to give anyone the recipe until he finally relinquished it to my mother (his daughter-in-law) before he passed away. It is a long-standing family favorite!"

    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1/4 cup white sugar
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk, at room temperature
    1 egg, at room temperature
    1 tablespoon oil
    2 teaspoons oil, or as needed

    Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a bowl; make a 'well' in the center of the flour mixture. Pour milk, eggs, and 1 tablespoon oil into the well. Mix until well moistened.
    Place a griddle over medium-high heat; sprinkle a few drops of water onto the griddle. If the droplets bounce, the griddle is ready; add 2 teaspoons oil.
    Spoon batter onto the griddle; cook until bubbles form and the edges are dry, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip and cook until browned on the other side, 3 to 5 more minutes. Repeat with remaining batter.

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    Feb 06, 2014 3:32 PM GMT
    Sounds good, and my husband makes waffles from scratch all the time. But when in a hurry we've also used a refrigerated canned product called "Batter Blaster" which is surprisingly good.

    In use it's like a tall can of whipped topping: you invert the can and the batter squirts out, either into a pan or griddle for pancakes, or into a waffle iron. That's all there is to it, and even Consumer Reports magazine thought it was pretty good. A little hard to find in stores, though.

    http://batterblaster.com
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Feb 06, 2014 6:37 PM GMT
    Draper said I tried the Fluffy ones but I like Grandad's better.

    Grandad's Pancakes

    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1/4 cup white sugar
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 cup milk, at room temperature
    1 egg, at room temperature
    1 tablespoon oil
    2 teaspoons oil, or as needed


    this is almost exactly the recipe i use too, with the exception of the amount of sugar, 1/4 C is a lot, i only use about a tablespoon. I like the pancake itself to be less sweet because you tend to always put something sweet on them. butter and pure maple syrup is hard to beat.

    I don't like the big cake-y style either, some recipes get into separating the eggs and whipping the whites , then folding them back into the batter blah blah blah, big waste of time as far as i'm concerned. I like mine on the thinner side where you can stack and layer with jam, syrup, butter, fruit, or powdered sugar.
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    Mar 04, 2014 7:12 PM GMT
    Once you have had a crepe flambeed in a liqueur you can never go back to simple pancakes icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 04, 2014 8:18 PM GMT
    Ohno saidOnce you have had a crepe flambeed in a liqueur you can never go back to simple pancakes icon_biggrin.gif

    Well then. You can stay over and serve me breakfast.
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    Mar 04, 2014 8:30 PM GMT
    Someone educate me on something....why would you put anything acidic on pancakes such as vinegar or lemon juice? Does it help with the batter's consistency?
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    Mar 04, 2014 8:56 PM GMT
    season the pan surface with oil prevents the pancakes from sticking and reduces using additional oil thus calories

    try increasing the liquid and make the pancakes super thin.
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    Mar 04, 2014 9:06 PM GMT
    Erik101 saidSomeone educate me on something....why would you put anything acidic on pancakes such as vinegar or lemon juice? Does it help with the batter's consistency?

    I think the recipe called for baking SODA instead of baking POWDER. Baking powder generates its own air bubbles during the baking. Baking soda needs some help to generate sufficient bubbles and that's what the acid is there for.

    What I've never understood is why people bother with using baking soda when it's easier to use baking powder. The timing of things is more important when you use baking soda and an acid.
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    Mar 04, 2014 9:33 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Erik101 saidSomeone educate me on something....why would you put anything acidic on pancakes such as vinegar or lemon juice? Does it help with the batter's consistency?

    I think the recipe called for baking SODA instead of baking POWDER. Baking powder generates its own air bubbles during the baking. Baking soda needs some help to generate sufficient bubbles and that's what the acid is there for.

    What I've never understood is why people bother with using baking soda when it's easier to use baking powder. The timing of things is more important when you use baking soda and an acid.


    Good explanation! I was wondering if the acid also reduces the carbohydrates.
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Mar 04, 2014 11:03 PM GMT
    Ohno saidOnce you have had a crepe flambeed in a liqueur you can never go back to simple pancakes icon_biggrin.gif


    anything flaming at the table is a plus, unless it's your waiter.

    conflagrantkidd.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2014 11:10 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Erik101 saidSomeone educate me on something....why would you put anything acidic on pancakes such as vinegar or lemon juice? Does it help with the batter's consistency?

    I think the recipe called for baking SODA instead of baking POWDER. Baking powder generates its own air bubbles during the baking. Baking soda needs some help to generate sufficient bubbles and that's what the acid is there for.

    What I've never understood is why people bother with using baking soda when it's easier to use baking powder. The timing of things is more important when you use baking soda and an acid.


    I always confuse baking powder and baking soda. The first recipe, Fluffy Pancakes, calls for baking powder, baking soda, and white vinegar. The second recipe, which I liked better, Grandad's pancakes, you need baking powder, no vinegar, and no baking soda.
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    Mar 04, 2014 11:32 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    Ohno saidOnce you have had a crepe flambeed in a liqueur you can never go back to simple pancakes icon_biggrin.gif


    anything flaming at the table is a plus, unless it's your waiter.

    conflagrantkidd.gif


    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
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    Mar 05, 2014 12:29 AM GMT
    Draper said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Erik101 saidSomeone educate me on something....why would you put anything acidic on pancakes such as vinegar or lemon juice? Does it help with the batter's consistency?

    I think the recipe called for baking SODA instead of baking POWDER. Baking powder generates its own air bubbles during the baking. Baking soda needs some help to generate sufficient bubbles and that's what the acid is there for.

    What I've never understood is why people bother with using baking soda when it's easier to use baking powder. The timing of things is more important when you use baking soda and an acid.


    I always confuse baking powder and baking soda. The first recipe, Fluffy Pancakes, calls for baking powder, baking soda, and white vinegar. The second recipe, which I liked better, Grandad's pancakes, you need baking powder, no vinegar, and no baking soda.

    Baking soda can have some positive effect when used with baking powder, but I don't remember what it is.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 05, 2014 12:39 AM GMT
    Google

    What Is the Difference Between Baking Soda & Baking Powder?

    http://chemistry.about.com/cs/foodchemistry/f/blbaking.htm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 06, 2014 6:18 PM GMT
    -for the average pancakes dont know why anyone would use backing soda.

    -pancakes are simple, the ingredients are inexpensive, why would you need a recipe.
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    Mar 06, 2014 7:13 PM GMT
    pellaz said-for the average pancakes dont know why anyone would use backing soda.

    -pancakes are simple, the ingredients are inexpensive, why would you need a recipe.

    My guess on the baking soda is that some people like the mystique of doing it the old way. And they believe that it's better.
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Mar 06, 2014 7:27 PM GMT
    pellaz said-for the average pancakes dont know why anyone would use backing soda.

    -pancakes are simple, the ingredients are inexpensive, why would you need a recipe.


    for the average pancake, no, but the right recipe is critical if you're also making a new headgasket:

    192314.jpg

    192313.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 06, 2014 10:42 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    pellaz said-for the average pancakes dont know why anyone would use backing soda.

    -pancakes are simple, the ingredients are inexpensive, why would you need a recipe.


    for the average pancake, no, but the right recipe is critical if you're also making a new headgasket:

    192314.jpg

    192313.jpg


    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Green Acres is the place to be!