RIP Pete Seeger

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    Jan 28, 2014 2:12 PM GMT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/arts/music/pete-seeger-songwriter-and-champion-of-folk-music-dies-at-94.html?hp&_r=0

    This bums me out. Of course, he was 94. But still. I liked the world a lot better with Pete Seeger in it. I met him once, briefly, in Rhinebeck, New York. I'd taken my kids up there to see Odetta (gone now too, sadly). She was performing there and was an old friend; afterwards she introduced us to Pete. We didn't get to say much more than "hello" but it was thrilling to me anyway.

    So long, pal.
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    Jan 28, 2014 3:14 PM GMT
    Where have all the flowers gone??

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    Jan 28, 2014 4:03 PM GMT
    I saw him perform live a few times. Such a sweet guy with a great sense of optimism and purpose.
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    Jan 28, 2014 5:08 PM GMT
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/3654312

    Wonderful human being!

    Peter "Pete" Seeger (May 3, 1919 – January 27, 2014) was an American folk singer. A fixture on nationwide radio in the 1940s, he also had a string of hit records during the early 1950s as a member of The Weavers, most notably their recording of Lead Belly's "Goodnight, Irene", which topped the charts for 13 weeks in 1950.[1] Members of The Weavers were blacklisted during the McCarthy Era. In the 1960s, he re-emerged on the public scene as a prominent singer of protest music in support of international disarmament, civil rights, counterculture, and environmental causes.

    As a song writer, he is best known as the author or co-author of "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" (with Joe Hickerson), "If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)" (composed with Lee Hays of The Weavers), and "Turn, Turn, Turn!", which have been recorded by many artists both in and outside the folk revival movement and are still sung throughout the world. "Flowers" was a hit recording for The Kingston Trio (1962); Marlene Dietrich, who recorded it in English, German and French (1962); and Johnny Rivers (1965). "If I Had a Hammer" was a hit for Peter, Paul & Mary (1962) and Trini Lopez (1963), while The Byrds popularized "Turn, Turn, Turn!" in the mid-1960s, as did Judy Collins in 1964 and The Seekers in 1966.

    Seeger was one of the folksingers most responsible for popularizing the spiritual "We Shall Overcome" (also recorded by Joan Baez and many other singer-activists) that became the acknowledged anthem of the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement, soon after folk singer and activist Guy Carawan introduced it at the founding meeting of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960. In the PBS American Masters episode "Pete Seeger: The Power of Song", Seeger stated it was he who changed the lyric from the traditional "We will overcome" to the more singable "We shall overcome".


  • Dave_StMtn

    Posts: 36

    Jan 28, 2014 5:14 PM GMT
    Aristoshark saidhttp://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/arts/music/pete-seeger-songwriter-and-champion-of-folk-music-dies-at-94.html?hp&_r=0

    This bums me out. Of course, he was 94. But still. I liked the world a lot better with Pete Seeger in it. I met him once, briefly, in Rhinebeck, New York. I'd taken my kids up there to see Odetta (gone now too, sadly). She was performing there and was an old friend; afterwards she introduced us to Pete. We didn't get to say much more than "hello" but it was thrilling to me anyway.

    So long, pal.


    Don't be sad - He wouldn't want you to be. He lived a life worth living and passed on more than most could hope to in several lifetimes.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jan 28, 2014 6:38 PM GMT
    Damn, I feel sad.

    Reading the NYT piece reminds me of the enormous power that simplicity has.
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    Jan 28, 2014 7:22 PM GMT
    Aristoshark said< I met him once, briefly, in Rhinebeck, New York. I'd taken my kids up there to see Odetta (gone now too, sadly). She was performing there and was an old friend; afterwards she introduced us to Pete. We didn't get to say much more than "hello" but it was thrilling to me anyway.

    So long, pal.

    Damn, I never got to do that. I envy you.
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    Jan 28, 2014 7:33 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Aristoshark said< I met him once, briefly, in Rhinebeck, New York. I'd taken my kids up there to see Odetta (gone now too, sadly). She was performing there and was an old friend; afterwards she introduced us to Pete. We didn't get to say much more than "hello" but it was thrilling to me anyway.

    So long, pal.

    Damn, I never got to do that. I envy you.

    My family has always been sort of hooked into the folk music scene. My father was friends with Josh White ("One Meat Ball"); he and his wife used to stay at our house when he performed in Detroit. Then when I was still in my teens I became friendly with Odetta, who used to perform at the Raven Gallery in Detroit often, and I'd go back afterwards and chat with her in her dressing room while she cleaned up. My friend Barbara used to coordinate tours for folk performers; she worked for Bill Graham Productions (of Fillmore East and Fillmore West fame) in California, so I met lots of the folk music people through her too, one of whom just died a couple weeks ago, my friend Sarah Elizabeth Campbell (cancer, of course, she was only 60). Sarah was a longtime stalwart of the Austin Texas folk/bluegrass community.

    Anyway, I wanted the kids to meet and hear Odetta, and she hadn't met them before. Pete Seeger was just there to hear her; he didn't perform. But she introduced us. All I could do was stammer about what an honor it was to meet him.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 28, 2014 9:11 PM GMT
    He was a great man, a peaceful man.
    He stood up to the House Un-American Activities Committee, during the 50's.
    Nothing stopped him.
    He went right on singing.
    Bless him.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Jan 28, 2014 9:51 PM GMT
    So sad to hear the news of his death. Without him the British folk scene would have been nowhere.

    The best of men.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Jan 28, 2014 9:55 PM GMT
    RIP to a great and inspirational man.
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    Jan 28, 2014 9:59 PM GMT
    He was unbelievably spry on the Colbert Report last year:



    One of my fave artists.
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    Jan 28, 2014 10:03 PM GMT
    All of the old talents are leaving us, sadly.
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    Jan 29, 2014 9:47 AM GMT
    And life will go on....... The sun will come out tomorrow.
  • bladeaddict

    Posts: 93

    Jan 30, 2014 5:42 AM GMT
    Pete Seeger was the best, most admirable and honorable kind of man. May he rest in peace, and may his legacy inspire others for a very long time. The world is a so much better place for his having lived the life he chose to live.