New Christie Shocker!

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    Jan 30, 2014 2:47 PM GMT
    Gov. Stay-Puft has been directly tied to the use of Hurricane Sandy money as a political slush fund to win endorsements. He used some of it to build a senior citizens' center in Belleville---a town that was not hit by the hurricane---and withheld it from towns that were whose mayors weren't as, shall we say, appreciative. And his fingerprints are actually on this one.

    He's going down. I'm so enjoying this.

    http://blog.nj.com/njv_editorial_page/2014/01/christie_awards_political_ally.html
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    Jan 31, 2014 4:29 AM GMT
    bump
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    Jan 31, 2014 5:35 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidThe NYT is not reporting it yet. So I will withhold judgment.

    The Star-Ledger is the most widely-read and respected newspaper in New Jersey. It's not some low-rent rag.
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    Jan 31, 2014 3:39 PM GMT
    gov StayPuft needs to go:
    we are not ready for another Nixon presidency yet

    i-am-not-a-crook.jpg
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    Jan 31, 2014 4:14 PM GMT
    pellaz saidgov StayPuft needs to go:
    we are not ready for another Nixon presidency yet

    i-am-not-a-crook.jpg


    You can only wish.

    Nixon - the most progressive President of that last half of the 20th century.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/richard-nixon-progressive/2013/01/18/edfb8d64-5e96-11e2-8acb-ab5cb77e95c8_story.html

    http://www.salon.com/2013/05/05/i_was_a_nixon_junkie_defending_the_20th_centurys_most_misunderstood_president_partner/

    "The foreign policy accomplishments are well documented and, however begrudgingly, praised in left-wing circles. It was these very accomplishments that were seen as safe subject matter for the funeral. They are remarkable not just for their success, but for the fundamentally progressive content of their character: disarmament in the form of the SALT treaties, restraint in support of Israel, choosing trade with China over the ideological rigidity of absolute good versus evil — these are the things that today’s Democrats can only dream of, lest they be accused of weakness, appeasement, and surrender. To an Angeleno teenager living in the latter days of George W. Bush, it looked like saintliness.

    Moreover, Nixon’s unexpected leftism didn’t end at the water’s edge. On the domestic front, Nixon had instituted wage and price controls, founded the EPA, claimed that solar and wind power were the only option for the 21st century, rejected the extreme voices of his own party when they tried to give Spiro Agnew’s job to Ronald Reagan (who Nixon called a “know-nothing”) instead of the relatively moderate Gerald Ford. His record read like everything I wished my party could admit standing for and still get elected.

    On the economy, Nixon declared himself — and all of us — to be Keynesians, saying flat out that the government does create jobs, siding with Paul Krugman, not Milton Friedman or Ayn Rand. On civil rights, he broke the 1959 Senate tie over strengthening the black vote in the former Confederacy; Senator John F. Kennedy sided with the South. As President he required affirmative action for federal contractors; Senator Sam Ervin, hero of the Watergate Committee, swore to fight integration to his last breath. On the environment — beyond the EPA and renewable energy — he halted dumping in the Great Lakes, passed the Clean Air Act, and formed a cabinet-level Council on Environmental Quality. He founded the Legal Services Corporation to assist the poor, opposed an amendment to protect school prayer, gave 18-year-olds the vote, ended the draft (finally), and was the first American president to propose the universal insurance mandate so hated by today’s Republicans. Ted Kennedy killed the legislation (it wasn’t liberal enough).

    I began to play a game called “Guess Who Said It.” The idea was to put two quotations on a political issue next to each other — one from Richard Nixon, and the other from a well-known contemporary Democrat. Here’s one with John Kerry on the topic of gun control. Guess who said it:


    Let me be clear. I support the Second Amendment. I am a gun owner. I am a hunter.

    I don’t know why an individual should have a right to a revolver in his house […] the kids usually kill themselves with it and so forth. Why can’t we go after handguns, period?

    Richard Nixon — the Big Bad of American politics, the most universally condemned president of the last 100 years — was to the left of John Kerry on gun control. In 1992, near the end of his life, he went on record saying flat out that “[w]e need gun laws stricter than the Brady Bill.”

    Of course, on all of these counts, the Nixon legacy is more complicated than I gave it credit for all those years ago. But by the beginning of my freshman year at the University of Chicago, I was a clear-eyed apologist for Nixon the Complex; a foot soldier for Nixon the Surprisingly Liberal, acting out my revisionist crusade, full of zealotry. I volunteered for the Obama campaign while I filled my dorm room with 1968 campaign posters. I argued for socialism in my freshman sociology classes while debating (to my parents’ horror) any fellow liberal I could find on the 37th president. There didn’t seem to be a contradiction — my hero and my left wing values fell hand in hand.

    In 15 short months, I had come from reflexively loathing to unconditionally loving The Great Boogeyman of American politics. From “Nixonland” to Nixonalia. From a toke to the needle. I was a Nixon junkie."
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    Jan 31, 2014 5:43 PM GMT
    woodsmen said^Freedom, Nixon's ill-reputes overshadowed his accomplishments. Democrats are the only one trying to raise his specter, not Republicans who want to bury him deeper than six feet. You are too attached to the black sheep--Romney and Nixon? Giggles!


    Far from it. A break in and coverup overshadows all of this? Hottjoe will be upset with you.

    "am surprised the authors did not mention Nixon’s enduring domestic legislation, which created the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Air and Water Acts, the earned income tax credit, Equal Employment Opportunity Act, Endangered Species Act and the Occupation Safety and Health Administration, among other progressive legislation. Indeed, in many respects Nixon was a demonstrably liberal president "

    And seriously, time to cut the 'giggles' shit as you sorta run that one right into the ground.
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    Jan 31, 2014 5:47 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidGiggles! Democrats mentioning Nixon is to set up a rhetorical scenario to poke fun at how far gone the present GOP party has gone as Nixon is not a sympathetic historical figure. (Am actually annoying you by my giggles?)


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    Jan 31, 2014 8:40 PM GMT
    YourName2000 said
    woodsmen saidGiggles! Democrats mentioning Nixon is to set up a rhetorical scenario to poke fun at how far gone the present GOP party has gone as Nixon is not a sympathetic historical figure. Also what was done by Nixon is criminal in nature not very Presidential as he would be the face of America to our children and the world.

    Nixon had recovered much of his reputation by the end...thanks in part to Clinton reaching out to him. I was actually surprised at how repaired his reputation had become.

    http://deadpresidents.tumblr.com/post/65450063030/do-you-think-nixon-redeemed-himself-as-an-elder

    That said, it is surprising how much more centrist the 'old' GOP was. For all his supposed 'greatness', I actually see Reagan as the start of the GOP's swing to the far right. I don't see it has having served the GOP well though...the rush to out-extreme his predecessor has created a Republican party that is far less electable than it should be, or that's healthy for a two party system democracy imo.


    That was his attack on Gerry Ford in 76. I ran a county campaign effort for Ford's reelection and it took me a while to get beyond that. I know there was the Nixon pardon of course that remained an issue, but other than that it was the primary challenge from the right that cost Ford the reelection. It's similar to what Ted Kennedy did to Carter in 1980. I didn't work much for Reagan in 1980, but did again 1984

    And really the right wing of the Republican party started showing its head in 64 with Goldwasser / Miller. I count that as my first political campaign given the Goldwater / Miller lapel buttons I wore to school in the 4th grade and the bumper sticker I kept putting on my parent's car. I also used to canvas door to door. All very funny today.

    photo Goldwater-Miller_1964.jpg
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    Feb 01, 2014 12:12 AM GMT
    The Johnson campaign had a very funny rebuttal to Goldwater's slogan ("In your heart you know he's right"). Their version, referring to Goldwater's admitted willingness to drop a nuclear bomb on the Soviet Union was, "In your heart you know he might". LOL
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    Feb 01, 2014 12:24 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidOn January 31, 2014, the NYT reported this article titled Ex-Port Authority Official Says ‘Evidence Exists’ Christie Knew About Lane Closings. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/01/nyregion/christie-bridge.html?ref=christopherjchristie&_r=0

    Yep, see this for details:

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/3659998