Virgins can get HPV

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 02, 2014 9:42 PM GMT
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/how-accurate-are-the-rece_b_4164056.html

    So, I was wondering, whether to get expensive HPV vaccine or not. But according to the article even virgins can get HPV. through fingers, mouth and genital contract. Fingers!!!icon_eek.gif Is it true. I mean why spend $500 (no insurance) to get all 3 shots, when I might already have it. I've also had sex already. So Yeah...
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    Feb 02, 2014 9:45 PM GMT
    I know of people who got stuff from sharing towels...sad times
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    Feb 02, 2014 9:54 PM GMT
    I recommend that OP gets a test first and if he comes up NEG. then go get the vaccine.
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    Feb 02, 2014 10:36 PM GMT
    Well then, if it were me, I'd get the vaccine while you're still young and hope for the best!
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    Feb 02, 2014 10:38 PM GMT
    I thought men are asymptomatic with HPV the only ones to worry about that are women, and since we are gay we don't have to worry about that. If you're bi, well that's you guys issue. icon_confused.gif
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Feb 02, 2014 10:44 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidHPV caused oral cancer in Michael Douglas, I thought.

    I have read it can also cause penile cancer - Now that would be a bummer if amputation were required !
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    Feb 02, 2014 11:18 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    pellaz saidthere is NO hpv test for men

    reference:
    http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-and-men.htm


    my opinion, i'm likely wrong, you already have it.


    This is not a correct statement. That site says there is no "recommended" HPV test for men. But there is testing for it and I have had it done. I had HPV at one time but my last test came back negative. The article you provided indicates this as well. Without exposure HPV can go away on its own.

    I had anal cancer in the past which was more than likely related to having HPV.


    Sorry to hear that man. I am booking my appointment this week to get the first shot. Well $500 wouldn't look too much if I get cancer.
  • PolitiMAC

    Posts: 728

    Feb 03, 2014 12:20 AM GMT
    Varus saidI thought men are asymptomatic with HPV the only ones to worry about that are women, and since we are gay we don't have to worry about that. If you're bi, well that's you guys issue. icon_confused.gif


    Nope. Affects men just as it does women. Just less chance of cancer in men if I recall correctly.

    it was a bit expensive, but my dad and his partner knew the potential consequences of HPV, so they got me the vaccine. It's always better to be safe than sorry icon_smile.gif
  • Joeyphx444

    Posts: 2382

    Feb 03, 2014 12:28 AM GMT
    hpv is the "cold" of the std world, it's like everyone gets it
  • LJay

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    Feb 03, 2014 2:42 AM GMT
    123triston, you live in Canada. Does the public health system not cover this?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2014 2:43 AM GMT
    Pazzy better watch out!!!!icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2014 2:51 AM GMT
    pellaz saidthere is NO hpv test for men
    reference:
    http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-and-men.htm
    my opinion, i'm likely wrong, you already have it.

    There was another thread about this topic. And someone mentioned that men should get anal pap smears or something.

    I think we should all just wear protective suits 24 hours a day. icon_confused.gif

    intel-manufacturingx-large.jpg
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    Feb 03, 2014 3:23 AM GMT
    LJay said123triston, you live in Canada. Does the public health system not cover this?


    It's covered for girls and women in British Columbia. I don't know about other provinces. Sucks I know.
  • bischero

    Posts: 847

    Feb 03, 2014 4:17 AM GMT
    Varus saidI thought men are asymptomatic with HPV the only ones to worry about that are women, and since we are gay we don't have to worry about that. If you're bi, well that's you guys issue. icon_confused.gif


    Throat and rectal cancer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2014 5:26 AM GMT
    Varus saidI thought men are asymptomatic with HPV the only ones to worry about that are women, and since we are gay we don't have to worry about that. If you're bi, well that's you guys issue. icon_confused.gif


    Stay in school.
  • frogman89

    Posts: 418

    Feb 03, 2014 2:16 PM GMT
    I think it's too exaggerated to cause panic because of HPV. One of the reasons why cervical carcinomata are much more frequent in women than penile carcinomata in men (caused by HPV) is simple: The precancerous lesions are harder to detect in women.

    It's not like you get colonized by HPV and boom - cancer. The tumor develops on a precancerous lesion which in this case are genital warts (condylomata acuminata). And long before genital warts turn into cancer they can be treated, for example with cryotherapy.

    All of this still sucks, but you can do something before it actually turns really bad.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2014 2:20 PM GMT
    i think you're being paranoid frankly, you have more bacteria, fungi and virus on your fingers than you can imagine, but if you wanna blow the $500, sure why not, get a flu shot too, what the heck
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    Feb 03, 2014 2:52 PM GMT
    Another reason to get the vaccine is that it protects against multiple strains.

    I had a wart causing strain and needed to get them surgically removed because they were abundant inside my rectum. My doctor still gave me the vaccine, however, because it would allow me to be protected from some of the other strains. There are a lot of strains and the vaccine only covers a few but they include known cancer causing strains and two strains that cause 90% of all genital wart cases.

    In addition, though the wart causing strains do not typically cause caner, my dermatologist explained that she did diagnose penile cancer on someone who has genital warts.
  • frogman89

    Posts: 418

    Feb 03, 2014 2:55 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    frogman89 saidI think it's too exaggerated to cause panic because of HPV. One of the reasons why cervical carcinomata are much more frequent in women than penile carcinomata in men (caused by HPV) is simple: The precancerous lesions are harder to detect in women.

    It's not like you get colonized by HPV and boom - cancer. The tumor develops on a precancerous lesion which in this case are genital warts (condylomata acuminata). And long before genital warts turn into cancer they can be treated, for example with cryotherapy.

    All of this still sucks, but you can do something before it actually turns really bad.


    Typically, the type of genital warts that are caused by HPV is not the same as the strains of HPV that can develop into cancer.

    In my paricular case, I had no warts. But I did have a 2mm squamous cell carcinoma lesion that was grossly (and initially) misdiagnosed as a fissure. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Luckily for me, I kept insisting that something was wrong and eventually was correctly diagnosed six months later.


    icon_eek.gif you are right. How embarrassing. The genital warts have a low potential of turning maligne.
    I just looked it up and it's the bowenoid papulosis and erythroplasia Queyrat that develop into cancer. Both of those can and should be detected very easily though. I'm sorry to hear you were misdiagnosed at first.

    ItzDaBreeze saidAnother reason to get the vaccine is that it protects against multiple strains.

    I had a wart causing strain and needed to get them surgically removed because they were abundant inside my rectum. My doctor still gave me the vaccine, however, because it would allow me to be protected from some of the other strains. There are a lot of strains and the vaccine only covers a few but they include known cancer causing strains and two strains that cause 90% of all genital wart cases.

    In addition, though the wart causing strains do not typically cause caner, my dermatologist explained that she did diagnose penile cancer on someone who has genital warts.

    In your rectum??
  • frogman89

    Posts: 418

    Feb 03, 2014 3:12 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    It was easily detected when I finally has a Pap smear test.

    I meant that the doctors who examined you before and misdiagnosed it as a fissure should have seen that it is a maligne lesion. If they had paid attention in dermatology, it would not have been a difficult visual diagnosis. The pap test is mearly a test to confirm the suspicion, even though a necessary one.
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    Feb 03, 2014 3:16 PM GMT
    frogman89 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    frogman89 saidI think it's too exaggerated to cause panic because of HPV. One of the reasons why cervical carcinomata are much more frequent in women than penile carcinomata in men (caused by HPV) is simple: The precancerous lesions are harder to detect in women.

    It's not like you get colonized by HPV and boom - cancer. The tumor develops on a precancerous lesion which in this case are genital warts (condylomata acuminata). And long before genital warts turn into cancer they can be treated, for example with cryotherapy.

    All of this still sucks, but you can do something before it actually turns really bad.


    Typically, the type of genital warts that are caused by HPV is not the same as the strains of HPV that can develop into cancer.

    In my paricular case, I had no warts. But I did have a 2mm squamous cell carcinoma lesion that was grossly (and initially) misdiagnosed as a fissure. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Luckily for me, I kept insisting that something was wrong and eventually was correctly diagnosed six months later.


    icon_eek.gif you are right. How embarrassing. The genital warts have a low potential of turning maligne.
    I just looked it up and it's the bowenoid papulosis and erythroplasia Queyrat that develop into cancer. Both of those can and should be detected very easily though. I'm sorry to hear you were misdiagnosed at first.

    ItzDaBreeze saidAnother reason to get the vaccine is that it protects against multiple strains.

    I had a wart causing strain and needed to get them surgically removed because they were abundant inside my rectum. My doctor still gave me the vaccine, however, because it would allow me to be protected from some of the other strains. There are a lot of strains and the vaccine only covers a few but they include known cancer causing strains and two strains that cause 90% of all genital wart cases.

    In addition, though the wart causing strains do not typically cause caner, my dermatologist explained that she did diagnose penile cancer on someone who has genital warts.

    In your rectum??




    Yes. It was on my anus which is how I first spotted it, but when I went to the dermatologist and she saw it, she recommended I go see a surgeon. My surgeon performed a visual and finger exam and noted that I had an anal condyloma (look it up) and so we went in to surgery later that month to have it removed. It was actually rather large, but thankfully, they were able to remove it all and the biopsies came back normal.

    My dermatologist said that anytime you see something on the outside, you need to check the inside to be sure it is okay as well. It is more common than not to have warts inside if you have them on the outside than not she said.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2014 5:32 PM GMT
    If anything, it will give you some peace of mind? Since you're young, I'd do it.

    talk to a doctor about it -- and be open and honest. try to find a gay doctor (if possible). and see what they suggest.