Is art worth the money u spend on it?.....

  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 13, 2014 5:11 AM GMT
    For those who collect art, do u buy art because u like the work or do u buy art for the prestige & status, an investment spent on a well-known artist? Is art an important part of ur life, the need to own art that speaks to u or do u think it's frivolous to purchase expensive art? Do u think it's all subjective, how prices are set? And what's ur take on Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Takashi Marakami & Richard Prince?.....
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Feb 13, 2014 5:27 AM GMT
    Meet Art

    557878.jpg
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    Feb 13, 2014 5:30 AM GMT
    I've only paid a lot (for me) of money for one piece. As far as I can tell from looking at collectors sites, it's worth more than I paid for it, although maybe not with inflation. I dunno, I still like it.

    Most of the pieces I've bought have been off the walls of bars for a hundred bucks, plus or minus. A few are things that friends made. I dunno. A couple of these things I think are great bargains - the guy's a genius. A couple I probably paid a little too much, but it helps a brother out.

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    Feb 13, 2014 5:40 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidMeet Art

    557878.jpg


    icon_eek.gif

    He.... Hello....

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    Feb 13, 2014 5:57 AM GMT
    i have a large art collection. Im not talking millions of dollars in paintings here.. I just 'happened' upon most of them in my younger days. Some from struggling art students, several AP, limited prints, etc. I have 2 unsigned originals, where the artist is now dead and his work commands a pretty penny. I wouldn't sell them. Art is such a personal expression for the owner as well as the artist. Mine is quite eclectic. And no velvet or burned wood anywhere… LOL.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 13, 2014 3:29 PM GMT
    hairyandym saidi have a large art collection. Im not talking millions of dollars in paintings here.. I just 'happened' upon most of them in my younger days. Some from struggling art students, several AP, limited prints, etc. I have 2 unsigned originals, where the artist is now dead and his work commands a pretty penny. I wouldn't sell them. Art is such a personal expression for the owner as well as the artist. Mine is quite eclectic. And no velvet or burned wood anywhere… LOL.


    Now burned wood like Louise Nevelson's is worth a pretty penny icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 13, 2014 3:32 PM GMT
    Well, as we say in the world of art, a piece of art is worth exactly as much as what someone is willing to pay for it.
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    Feb 13, 2014 3:40 PM GMT
    As I posted once before, most of my artwork was damaged by smoke when I had a kitchen fire. When I retire, I'm going to have to redraw, repaint a lot of these.
    twomen.jpg
    This one looks like a rorschach test.
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    Feb 13, 2014 3:45 PM GMT
    My ex-BF was the President of an art museum (I think he's just on the Board now). He has a personal collection of over 500 paintings, and other artwork.

    His art work appreciates. Worth way more than he paid for it. And most of it is kept in storage, he has no place to display that much. Some rotates through the museum (including my own portrait that I've posted here), but most is never seen.

    So yeah, in purely investment terms art can be a good choice. Or if you simply like something, and it pleases you. Difficult to put a price on that.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 13, 2014 7:13 PM GMT
    ART_DECO saidMy ex-BF was the President of an art museum (I think he's just on the Board now). He has a personal collection of over 500 paintings, and other artwork.

    His art work appreciates. Worth way more than he paid for it. And most of it is kept in storage, he has no place to display that much. Some rotates through the museum (including my own portrait that I've posted here), but most is never seen.

    So yeah, in purely investment terms art can be a good choice. Or if you simply like something, and it pleases you. Difficult to put a price on that.


    I have a Lee Dunsmore bronze I paid $6700 for. An Edgar Brandt replica bronze snake torchiere floor lamp I paid $5000 that looks better than the original icon_smile.gif 2 Kathleen Holmes sculptures at $1600. Paintings, mix-media collages, watercolors, drawings, sketches & signed limited edition prints, etchings & lithographs from various artists. Original ceramic pieces from great ceramists I've come across. $1600 carved wooden bird from the Annual Philadelphia Craft Show, along with jewelry, textiles, porcelain, furniture & tin whirligigs from craft artists from shows past. As well as some antique pieces I've gotten from Annual Philadelphia Antique Shows. I have a great eye for art & all the pieces I've collected will only appreciate in value icon_smile.gif .....
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 14, 2014 12:49 AM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidAs I posted once before, most of my artwork was damaged by smoke when I had a kitchen fire. When I retire, I'm going to have to redraw, repaint a lot of these.
    twomen.jpg
    This one looks like a rorschach test.


    Must be terrible to lose ur own work or have it be damaged. Nothing to show for all those years of creating. Did u document ur work?
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Feb 14, 2014 12:52 AM GMT
    Art, and investment in the arts, is worth far more than the sticker price. Period.

    Prices do not subjectively increase, for the most part. Supply and demand is well and alive in the art market, like most other markets.

    Art "stars" like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and the like do not necessarily make the best work, but they know how to work it, that's for sure.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 14, 2014 2:15 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidArt, and investment in the arts, is worth far more than the sticker price. Period.

    Prices do not subjectively increase, for the most part. Supply and demand is well and alive in the art market, like most other markets.

    Art "stars" like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and the like do not necessarily make the best work, but they know how to work it, that's for sure.


    They're like rock stars in the artworld. It's crazy what their art fetches for.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Feb 14, 2014 3:00 AM GMT
    Tanner said
    Bunjamon saidArt, and investment in the arts, is worth far more than the sticker price. Period.

    Prices do not subjectively increase, for the most part. Supply and demand is well and alive in the art market, like most other markets.

    Art "stars" like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and the like do not necessarily make the best work, but they know how to work it, that's for sure.


    They're like rock stars in the artworld. It's crazy what their art fetches for.


    It's also crazy how underwhelming it is sometimes, too, in my book.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Feb 14, 2014 3:06 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidArt, and investment in the arts, is worth far more than the sticker price. Period.

    Prices do not subjectively increase, for the most part. Supply and demand is well and alive in the art market, like most other markets.

    Art "stars" like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and the like do not necessarily make the best work, but they know how to work it, that's for sure.


    Very well said.
    I wouldn't say anything made by Koons or Hirst should even be called art. Koons and Hirt will never be known as the Van Goughs or Cezannes (or even the Diebenkorns) of their day. Most contemporary "art" is crap. Sold to the gullible who want to own the latest and most expensive. Fifty years after its purchase, because out of style, this "art" will probably be worth less than what was paid for it. In buying art, stick to what you really like. And keep your eyes open for things that you cannot afford now, but may come up for auction later. I have some art which I really couldn't afford, but I will always be glad I bought it. Something to look at every day.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 14, 2014 4:54 PM GMT
    Bunjamon said
    Tanner said
    Bunjamon saidArt, and investment in the arts, is worth far more than the sticker price. Period.

    Prices do not subjectively increase, for the most part. Supply and demand is well and alive in the art market, like most other markets.

    Art "stars" like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, and the like do not necessarily make the best work, but they know how to work it, that's for sure.


    They're like rock stars in the artworld. It's crazy what their art fetches for.


    It's also crazy how underwhelming it is sometimes, too, in my book.


    There are so many tribes. Words like "pure", "real", "authentic", "integrity" & "forthright" are always being thrown around when describing "true" artists & their work, while savvy "con"-artists like Hirst & Koons & their coterie of "business" partners---dealers, curators, advisers, facilitators & high-end collectors/patrons---are all laughing all the way to the bank with their 1% pyramid scheme.....
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    Feb 14, 2014 5:55 PM GMT
    Take a look at these paintings that sold for over a million and be mind boggled. If you're an artist, don't look. You'll be so depressed.
    http://www.artsumo.com/blog/post/4
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Feb 14, 2014 6:11 PM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidTake a look at these paintings that sold for over a million and be mind boggled. If you're an artist, don't look. You'll be so depressed.
    http://www.artsumo.com/blog/post/4

    Those paintings look more like a scam to pay somebody off and then give them some piece of shit and claim they sold it to them so they can make the large sum of money transfer look legit.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 14, 2014 6:24 PM GMT
    I'm always perplexed as to why artists are poor when they charge so much for a simple painting. And why do they spend so much money on art school? Is it to make connections? I get sick of derivative art learned in a classroom. To add insult to injury, the most profitable artists are better at self promotion than they are at making art. The whole industry of universities, galleries, auctions and mass production is so pretentious, mainly because it's so uninspiring.... However, every once in awhile an artist comes along with a vision that makes all the hype (and body mutilation) seem worth it.
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    Feb 14, 2014 7:58 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    JohnSpotter saidTake a look at these paintings that sold for over a million and be mind boggled. If you're an artist, don't look. You'll be so depressed.
    http://www.artsumo.com/blog/post/4

    Those paintings look more like a scam to pay somebody off and then give them some piece of shit and claim they sold it to them so they can make the large sum of money transfer look legit.

    Interesting theory and a lot more believable.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Feb 14, 2014 8:39 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI'm always perplexed as to why artists are poor when they charge so much for a simple painting.

    And why do they spend so much money on art school?

    Even good ("undiscovered") artists are often poor. Dealers take 50% of a sale, and typically the artist has to pay for framing as well.

    Art school? It seems most "art schools" today are teaching computer generated art. Those who attend such places are hoping to get hired in the film/TV/computer graphics sector of "Art," and hoping to get a big income. Easy to get tuition loans. Probably not true of RISD or institutions like it, where they still teach painting.
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    Feb 14, 2014 8:58 PM GMT
    I never spend money on art
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Feb 14, 2014 9:28 PM GMT
    The top 1% want to stay on top & keep generating all the wealth off of their work & patrons/collectors & the artworlld ecosystem who invest & promote their work want to keep the 1% on top so their investments keep appreciating in value, while the rest of the 99% of artists are left to fade into oblivion.....
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 14, 2014 9:42 PM GMT
    Suetonius said
    HottJoe saidI'm always perplexed as to why artists are poor when they charge so much for a simple painting.

    And why do they spend so much money on art school?

    Even good ("undiscovered") artists are often poor. Dealers take 50% of a sale, and typically the artist has to pay for framing as well.

    Art school? It seems most "art schools" today are teaching computer generated art. Those who attend such places are hoping to get hired in the film/TV/computer graphics sector of "Art," and hoping to get a big income. Easy to get tuition loans. Probably not true of RISD or institutions like it, where they still teach painting.

    Of course there are a lot of good artists (and writers and musicians) who go undiscovered. Then there are artists who end up in museums. But this thread is about buying art, and if you're just an average homeowner and you're in the market for original art, or more likely art prints, they are expensive, and if you cheap out it shows. It's challenging to find interesting art without breaking the bank. You have to have an eye for it. I think decorators just look for whatever matches a room.

    It just seems like many of the professional artists must be making it based on who they know with a gallery, what city they're in, etc. I enjoy creating art, but I'm turned off by the snobbery in the art world, which seems like nothing but people circle jerking each other and promoting each other as favors. My favorite artist is Van Gogh, but he was psychotic. The snobs always turn away from the sick ones, especially in this day and age, when we're quick to blacklist people. When talent has become watered down and originality is exhausted you have to have a buddy list.
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    Feb 14, 2014 9:58 PM GMT
    If you can afford great art, it will enrich your life far beyond what you pay for it.