Apprehensive, Many Doctors Shift to Salary Jobs

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    Feb 14, 2014 1:42 AM GMT
    American physicians, worried about changes in the health care market, are streaming into salaried jobs with hospitals. Though the shift from private practice has been most pronounced in primary care, specialists are following.

    Last year, 64 percent of job offers filled through Merritt Hawkins, one of the nation’s leading physician placement firms, involved hospital employment, compared with only 11 percent in 2004. The firm anticipates a rise to 75 percent in the next two years.

    Today, about 60 percent of family doctors and pediatricians, 50 percent of surgeons and 25 percent of surgical subspecialists — such as ophthalmologists and ear, nose and throat surgeons — are employees rather than independent, according to the American Medical Association. “We’re seeing it changing fast,” said Mark E. Smith, president of Merritt Hawkins.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/14/us/salaried-doctors-may-not-lead-to-cheaper-health-care.html?hp
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    Feb 14, 2014 2:01 AM GMT
    Health economists are nearly unanimous that the United States should move away from fee-for-service payments to doctors, the traditional system where private physicians are paid for each procedure and test, because it drives up the nation’s $2.7 trillion health care bill by rewarding overuse. But experts caution that the change from private practice to salaried jobs may not yield better or cheaper care for patients.
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    Feb 14, 2014 2:36 AM GMT
    When hospitals gather the right mix of salaried front-line doctors and specialists under one roof, it can yield cost-efficient and coordinated patient care. The Kaiser system in California and Intermountain Healthcare in Utah are considered models for how this can work.
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    Feb 14, 2014 3:15 AM GMT


    SB there are many, many highly paid jobs that are salaried, and those people are fine with it, and those jobs are also highly sought after.

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    Feb 14, 2014 3:21 AM GMT
    Hospitals have been offering physicians attractive employment deals, with incomes often greater than in private practice, since they need to form networks to take advantage of incentives under the new Affordable Care Act. Hospitals also know that doctors they employ can better direct patients to hospital-owned labs and services.
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    Feb 14, 2014 4:00 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    woodsmen saidHealth economists are nearly unanimous that the United States should move away from fee-for-service payments to doctors, the traditional system where private physicians are paid for each procedure and test, because it drives up the nation’s $2.7 trillion health care bill by rewarding overuse. But experts caution that the change from private practice to salaried jobs may not yield better or cheaper care for patients.


    Will it also cause less people to be interested in becoming doctors? (Less financial upside potential when you are on salary, vs working as many hours as you choose.)


    I can deal with less people interested in becoming doctors if their decision to be one is based on what it pays.
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    Feb 14, 2014 4:37 AM GMT
    The base salaries of physicians who become employees are still related to the income they can generate, ranging from under $200,000 for primary care doctors to $575,000 in cardiology to $663,000 in neurosurgery, according to Becker’s Hospital Review, a trade publication.

    Dr. Howard B. Beckman, a geriatrician at the University of Rochester, who studies physician payment incentives, said reimbursements for primary care doctors must be improved to attract more people into the field. “To get the kinds of doctors we want, the system for determining salaries has to flip faster,” he said.