Thinking about moving to USA or Canada.

  • mladri

    Posts: 264

    Feb 14, 2014 10:56 AM GMT
    Hello guys!

    I'm thinking about moving to USA or Canada after my degree in maritime engineering. I already have degree in architecture. So, my question is, what you guys think that is the best place to start a new life, far away from home?

    I would love to live and work in some smaller city. Do you guys have any suggestions what place would be the best to start a new life, to start my career...

    Thank you guys for your help.
    Cheers icon_smile.gif





    and btw, happy Valentines day icon_smile.gif
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Feb 14, 2014 3:45 PM GMT
    Maritime engineering screams Maritime provinces in Canada. I haven't been but many if my friends from university live in Halifax and they like it a lot.
  • mladri

    Posts: 264

    Feb 14, 2014 3:47 PM GMT
    Thank you Bunjamon icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 14, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    for an engineering degree person you need to locate in a medium or larger city. Forget the small town.
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    Feb 14, 2014 3:49 PM GMT
    Canada seems nice, but I could never deal with the cold. The Southern or Western U.S. has great weather.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Feb 14, 2014 4:09 PM GMT
    What exactly is maritime engineering, doesn't it have to do with boats and ships? I don't think you are going to find that kind of work in a small town. And if you are gay, the last place you should want to live is in a small town, unless you plan on being alone the rest of your life.
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    Feb 14, 2014 4:37 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said ... if you are gay, the last place you should want to live is in a small town ...
    this is very true too and a good point.

    the OP holds multiple degrees:
    -get a job in a small town and kiss that architecture degree good by.
    -a small town employer treats their engineering staff badly because they know there is no where for them to go to.
    -a small design shop in a small town will have junk projects.
    -if at some point you want to go into consulting you want a large local customer base.

    I would look federal or state government employers.

    you want to locate near an university

    dont under estimate;
    the American population has grown very inward. The average Joe is short on the critical thinking. Travel, education and self evaluation really make the human nature blossom. Your friends and environment contribute to at least 30% of your house hold.
  • mladri

    Posts: 264

    Feb 14, 2014 5:07 PM GMT
    Thank you guys for your answers, I really appreciate that icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 14, 2014 5:16 PM GMT
    Maybe Ft. Lauderdale or the Florida Keys?

    Ft Lauderdale is a medium size city just north of Miami. Kinda like a big suburb. Low crime, nice weather, and a huge gay population. It's right next to the ocean so I will assume you could use your degree to find something to do.

    The Keys is south of Miami and is similar to Ft. Lauderdale except much smaller and has more of a small town vibe. The scenery is much better though.
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    Feb 14, 2014 9:09 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidIt is almost impossible to come to the USA to work. If you are lucky enough to find a company that will sponsor your H-1B visa, you will only be able to stay here for a few years at most. And unfortunately, we currently kick out anyone who is here on an education visa as soon as they graduate.

    I really don't know what it's like in Canada, maybe it's easier there.


    Your biggest problem will be getting a visa to immigrate somewhere.

    Southbeach is right, in that it is difficult to get a work visa for the USA - you need a job first. However, it is often possible to stay in the USA after the visa expires, depending on the country you come from. You have a much better chance of being able to stay (and get permanent residency status) if you are from a european country, because there are a lot fewer applicants from europe, than say Mexico, the Phillipines, or India, becasue those countries have so many applicants on HB1 visas, that it takes many years to work through the quotas. The fewer applicants, the faster to work through a country's quota.
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    Feb 14, 2014 9:10 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidCanada seems nice, but I could never deal with the cold. The Southern or Western U.S. has great weather.
    Vancouver is temperate.
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    Feb 14, 2014 9:24 PM GMT
    I think threads like this are so funny because they show how little research the person has done on their own. Have you actually looked at what is involved in emigrating to a western nation? You better be a refugee or a high demand profession and even then you are looking at a very long difficult process.
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    Feb 14, 2014 9:36 PM GMT
    Florida, San Diego or New Orleans come to mind.
  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Feb 14, 2014 10:04 PM GMT
    States that have a high percentage of "maritime" engineers

    Texas
    Virginia
    Washington (state)
    Florida
    Maryland
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    Feb 14, 2014 10:07 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Puppenjunge said
    southbeach1500 saidIt is almost impossible to come to the USA to work. If you are lucky enough to find a company that will sponsor your H-1B visa, you will only be able to stay here for a few years at most. And unfortunately, we currently kick out anyone who is here on an education visa as soon as they graduate.

    I really don't know what it's like in Canada, maybe it's easier there.


    Your biggest problem will be getting a visa to immigrate somewhere.

    Southbeach is right, in that it is difficult to get a work visa for the USA - you need a job first. However, it is often possible to stay in the USA after the visa expires, depending on the country you come from. You have a much better chance of being able to stay (and get permanent residency status) if you are from a european country, because there are a lot fewer applicants from europe, than say Mexico, the Phillipines, or India, becasue those countries have so many applicants on HB1 visas, that it takes many years to work through the quotas. The fewer applicants, the faster to work through a country's quota.


    3 points:

    1) I would never overstay my visa. It's a mark on your record and could prove to be an obstacle to obtaining a permanent residency card.

    2) Yep, good point about certain areas of the world having an easier time than others. Add Eastern European countries to the list of "difficult" - a friend has been stuck in "administrative processing" for his H-1B visa for almost 3 years now. His original work authorization date has expired, but the idiots at the embassy still list him as in "administrative processing."

    3) I wasn't aware there were country quotas. The only quota I am aware of for H-1B was the 65,000 limit (might be higher these days), but that was a limit for incoming, i.e. it didn't matter where the person was coming from. I do know there are country quotas for the annual visa lottery.

    There is not a country quota for H1B visas. There is a country quota for permanent residency status - which is what one can apply for when the H1B visa expires and can no longer be renewed.
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    Feb 14, 2014 10:26 PM GMT
    You can get a residency in Canada without ever having set foot in the country, provided you have a skill and your youth to offer, which you do. The eastern provinces have maritime industries, and sea-based oil extraction is taking off there and soon in eastern Quebec too. The weather in Newfoundland however is among the most difficult you will find anywhere. Disregard what someone else said about needing to speak French in Quebec. I know two young anglophone engineers who found great jobs in Montréal. You might consider Montréal as it has a small-town feel and Canada's second largest port and does not suffer from sprawl compared to other North American cities.

    Have known other immigrants who came to Canada first, with an eye of eventually moving to the USA if things did not work out here. Not a bad strategy.

    Just keep in mind that North America is a huge area and so many of its different places can seem like different countries. Whether you like it here is all a matter of where you end up.
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    Feb 14, 2014 11:23 PM GMT
    OnceUponATime saidI think threads like this are so funny because they show how little research the person has done on their own. Have you actually looked at what is involved in emigrating to a western nation? You better be a refugee or a high demand profession and even then you are looking at a very long difficult process.


    Why spend time doing research when there are oodles of people who will do it for you for free? jaja!
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    Feb 15, 2014 6:17 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    OnceUponATime saidI think threads like this are so funny because they show how little research the person has done on their own. Have you actually looked at what is involved in emigrating to a western nation? You better be a refugee or a high demand profession and even then you are looking at a very long difficult process.


    Why spend time doing research when there are oodles of people who will do it for you for free? jaja!


    + Priceless
  • mladri

    Posts: 264

    Feb 15, 2014 11:25 AM GMT
    I have done my research, but I just wanted to ask you guys your opinions.
    It is easier to get working visa for Canada, but I'm afraid that it would be hard to find job there because I don't speak French very well.
    Thank you guys for your help, I really appreciate that icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 15, 2014 12:30 PM GMT
    Mladri, my question would be: what sort of amenities/lifestyle are you looking for in this smaller-to-medium size city? What sort of life do you envision for yourself?
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Feb 15, 2014 12:31 PM GMT
    mladri saidI have done my research, but I just wanted to ask you guys your opinions.
    It is easier to get working visa for Canada, but I'm afraid that it would be hard to find job there because I don't speak French very well.
    Thank you guys for your help, I really appreciate that icon_smile.gif


    You know 75% of Canadians don't know how to speak French?
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Feb 15, 2014 12:33 PM GMT
    pellaz said
    AMoonHawk said ... if you are gay, the last place you should want to live is in a small town ...
    this is very true too and a good point.

    the OP holds multiple degrees:
    -get a job in a small town and kiss that architecture degree good by.
    -a small town employer treats their engineering staff badly because they know there is no where for them to go to.
    -a small design shop in a small town will have junk projects.
    -if at some point you want to go into consulting you want a large local customer base.



    Do you guys just pull these statements out of your ass?
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    Feb 15, 2014 2:57 PM GMT

    http://ca.indeed.com/jobs?q=Marine+Engineer&matchtype=b&network=g&device=c&devicemodel=&creative=29153949901&keyword=_inurl:ca.indeed.com/&placement=&param1=&param2=&random=1767193512640504268&aceid=&adposition=1t2&gclid=CK-Ch4WyzrwCFU5efgoduBkAWw
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 15, 2014 2:59 PM GMT

    In Canada you have 100% equality protected by law, both Provincial and Federal.

  • mladri

    Posts: 264

    Feb 15, 2014 4:57 PM GMT
    Thank you Meninlove for your help, I think that Canada would be a better choice.