Millennials Feel Trapped in a Cycle of Internships

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    Feb 15, 2014 2:26 AM GMT
    Like other 20-somethings seeking a career foothold, Andrew Lang, a graduate of Penn State, took an internship at an upstart Beverly Hills production company at age 29 as a way of breaking into movie production. It didn’t pay, but he hoped the exposure would open doors.

    When that internship proved to be a dead end, Mr. Lang went to work at a second production company, again as an unpaid intern. When that went nowhere, he left for another, doing whatever was asked, like delivering bottles of wine to 27 offices before Christmas. But that company, too, could not afford to hire him, even part time.

    A year later, Mr. Lang is on his fourth internship, this time for a company that produces reality TV shows. While this internship at least pays him (he makes $10 an hour, with few perks), Mr. Lang feels no closer to a real job and worries about being an intern forever. “No one hires interns,” said Mr. Lang, who sees himself as part of a “revolving class of people” who can’t break free of the intern cycle. “Is this any way to live?”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/fashion/millennials-internships.html?ref=fashion
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    Feb 15, 2014 2:42 AM GMT
    I know people who started out as interns and were hired by the companies they worked. Sadly I was not one of them cause I chose to work for a place with a tight budget. icon_neutral.gif

    But I agree it's tough out there.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Feb 15, 2014 7:34 PM GMT
    They need to begin a maximum wage, that diminishes with age to force baby boomers out...for the sake of the economy.
  • PolitiMAC

    Posts: 728

    Feb 16, 2014 7:57 AM GMT
    Apparition saidThey need to begin a maximum wage, that diminishes with age to force baby boomers out...for the sake of the economy.


    NO. NO, NO, NO. You will get rid of experienced and productive employees, further wrecking business. It's not an easy setup, and there's no simple way to fix it, but making redundant older people will be horrendous.

    The way to help is to not print money, (thanks Obama) and to lower regulation and tax.

    Our Australian Coalition government is moving thoroughly into doing this very same thing, even though we never went to the printing money bullshit. It's hard and it hurts for a time, but after it's done, everything runs far more smoothly.