Most Americans Now Support Gay Marriage, According to Latest Survey

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 26, 2014 4:27 PM GMT
    Some 53 percent of those surveyed by the Public Religion Research Institute said they supported gay marriage, up from 32 percent in 2003...

    ...with 83 percent of Jews polled supporting [same-sex marrige]. White Roman Catholics were next at 58 percent and 56 percent of Hispanic Catholics agreed with it.

    Support among Protestants was lower with 69 percent of white evangelical Protestants, 59 percent of black Protestants and 49 percent of Hispanic Protestants opposing gay and lesbian marriage. Nearly three-quarters, or 73 percent, of religiously unaffiliated Americans favor legalizing it.


    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/most-americans-now-support-gay-marriage-according-survey-n38916
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2014 1:18 AM GMT
    But wait, heres another petition for Arizona. Really shows large states and majority rulings here in the USA.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2014 3:30 AM GMT
    Well, since Arizona Governor Brewer just did veto this bill, I think this i unnecessary.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2014 6:07 AM GMT
    With America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been married, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2014 6:36 AM GMT
    you guys are super unattractive, marriage was not a choice
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Feb 27, 2014 6:41 AM GMT
    tru_blu_ozzie saidWith America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been marriage, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.


    America is not a Christian country. The majority of citizens are Christian, many in name only, but there are also large percentages of atheists and other religions.
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    Feb 27, 2014 6:42 AM GMT
    waccamatt said
    tru_blu_ozzie saidWith America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been marriage, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.


    America is not a Christian country. The majority of citizens are Christian, many in name only, but there are also large percentages of atheists and other religions.

    Why are you responding to Pattison's gibberish?
  • PolitiMAC

    Posts: 728

    Feb 27, 2014 7:00 AM GMT
    Trying to get a good bead on what the American population think on certain things would be bloody hard. Even Federal elections just do not give a substantial indication on what people really want.

    Any survey in the US can't be used as gospel fact. The only way would be to get a whole census on EVERYONE, or at least a substantial percentage of everyone.

    Still nice outcome though icon_smile.gif
  • Cutlass

    Posts: 426

    Mar 08, 2014 10:09 AM GMT
    ART_DECO saidSome 53 percent of those surveyed by the Public Religion Research Institute said they supported gay marriage, up from 32 percent in 2003...

    ...with 83 percent of Jews polled supporting [same-sex marrige]. White Roman Catholics were next at 58 percent and 56 percent of Hispanic Catholics agreed with it.

    Support among Protestants was lower with 69 percent of white evangelical Protestants, 59 percent of black Protestants and 49 percent of Hispanic Protestants opposing gay and lesbian marriage. Nearly three-quarters, or 73 percent, of religiously unaffiliated Americans favor legalizing it.


    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/most-americans-now-support-gay-marriage-according-survey-n38916


    I believe these statistics show a growing trend in the acceptance of gay marriage, and those that oppose it will be left in the dust. It's surprising that the majority of Catholics support same sex marriages, yet the hierarchy in Rome, Italy won't budge. And in the U.S. we have the archbishop of Portland, Oregon trying to mobilize the faithful (and its allies Mormons, evangelicals, fundamentalists) in trying to stop gay marriages when the archbishops of Minneapolis and Seattle already failed in their efforts. I don't see why the r.c. lay people don't leave the church when they can't abide by its teachings.
    The Mormons have always been slow to support human rights, civil rights, and social justice (repudiation of polygamy, elevation of blacks to the priesthood, etc.). But they eventually come around when they see what the rest of the country is like.
    As for the evangelicals and fundamentalists, who are mostly active in the Deep South, they are likely in the future to be so outside the mainstream of America that they will look like a cult. I predict they will be a marginal influence in the future.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Mar 09, 2014 7:17 PM GMT
    But meanwhile, in that great big GOP tent...
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14348

    Mar 09, 2014 8:14 PM GMT
    tazzari saidBut meanwhile, in that great big GOP tent...
    Hopefully all the NARROW MINDED BIBLE THUMPING SCREWBALLS will be permanently evicted from the GOP and forced onto the outermost fringes of American society where they belong. We should make the entire State of Texas a UN administered special reservation for all these right wing lunatics since it is the most virulently homophobic state in the US. We really don't need Texas statehood anymore, goodbye.
  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1981

    Mar 09, 2014 9:05 PM GMT
    It's important to remember that bigoted Republican politicians who oppose same-sex marriage now represent a SMALL MINORITY of Americans.
    53%-32% is a huge margin to be losing by.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14348

    Mar 09, 2014 9:29 PM GMT
    KissTheSky saidIt's important to remember that bigoted Republican politicians who oppose same-sex marriage now represent a SMALL MINORITY of Americans.
    53%-32% is a huge margin to be losing by.
    Except in the most conservative southern states like Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina. The only way same sex marriage will ever happen in those states is through Federal Court orders. There will still be strong opposition by appealing those Federal Court orders. So some parts of the US are not going to change anytime soon.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 10, 2014 12:27 AM GMT
    tazzari saidBut meanwhile, in that great big GOP tent...


    We're doing fine. Thanks for asking.

    It's taking a little longer but we're getting there.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Mar 11, 2014 11:24 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    tazzari saidBut meanwhile, in that great big GOP tent...


    We're doing fine. Thanks for asking.

    It's taking a little longer but we're getting there.


    Pity about all the damage in the meantime, though...
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    Mar 11, 2014 11:40 PM GMT
    tazzari said
    freedomisntfree said
    tazzari saidBut meanwhile, in that great big GOP tent...


    We're doing fine. Thanks for asking.

    It's taking a little longer but we're getting there.


    Pity about all the damage in the meantime, though...


    Sounds flippant, but that happens .... unless you have some other solution that would work quicker and last.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Mar 12, 2014 1:00 AM GMT
    Not intended as flippant. I simply look at the hate, fear and downright loony hysteria, not to mention all the religiosity, psuedo or otherwise, that emanates from the GOP to feel revulsion for a party that puts up with it all, not to mention demonizing of the poor, selling out to people like the Koch brothers, etc.. As for "some other solution," I have it: I refuse to vote for Republican candidates.

    Now, don't get me wrong: a strong, functioning GOP would be an enormous advantage to a working democracy in out country, and I used to vote for old-fashioned Republicans like Dan Evans (governor, Washington state), but that party - the "we have another idea, but we'll meet you in the middle" party - is dead.

    I'm glad you are fighting to change things. But until there is a sea-change, I cannot vote for a party which behaves as the GOP does and panders to the right-wing extremists.

    I have much respect for you, so I don't want to get into an argument - take this however, as the feeling that current GOP tactics have on someone who used to, and would like to be able to again, support them.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Mar 12, 2014 1:03 AM GMT
    Sharkadelic said
    waccamatt said
    tru_blu_ozzie saidWith America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been marriage, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.


    America is not a Christian country. The majority of citizens are Christian, many in name only, but there are also large percentages of atheists and other religions.

    Why are you responding to Pattison's gibberish?


    Why are you concerned with what I'm doing?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2014 4:10 AM GMT
    tazzari saidNot intended as flippant. I simply look at the hate, fear and downright loony hysteria, not to mention all the religiosity, psuedo or otherwise, that emanates from the GOP to feel revulsion for a party that puts up with it all, not to mention demonizing of the poor, selling out to people like the Koch brothers, etc.. As for "some other solution," I have it: I refuse to vote for Republican candidates.

    Now, don't get me wrong: a strong, functioning GOP would be an enormous advantage to a working democracy in out country, and I used to vote for old-fashioned Republicans like Dan Evans (governor, Washington state), but that party - the "we have another idea, but we'll meet you in the middle" party - is dead.

    I'm glad you are fighting to change things. But until there is a sea-change, I cannot vote for a party which behaves as the GOP does and panders to the right-wing extremists.

    I have much respect for you, so I don't want to get into an argument - take this however, as the feeling that current GOP tactics have on someone who used to, and would like to be able to again, support them.


    "Not intended as flippant"

    I meant my "that happens" response sounded flippant. Didn't intend for it to be. It's just that we have much work to do to bring the party forward or maybe a better way to describe it would be ... back to what it was 40 or 50 years ago, and there will be mistakes along the way.

    Now we're seeing some movement from some of the very well respected elder statesmen in the party and the youngins are mostly on board or at least not in opposition. I must stay involved and do what little I can.

    I can still end up working for a POTUS candidate and then go out and vote for the other side like I did for the conservative candidate in 1972, George McGovern.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 12, 2014 4:28 AM GMT
    waccamatt said
    tru_blu_ozzie saidWith America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been marriage, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.


    America is not a Christian country. The majority of citizens are Christian, many in name only, but there are also large percentages of atheists and other religions.


    Yes America also has Muslim Americans and Jewish Americans too, but that does not mean it's not the worlds largest Christian country, and America also keeps religion alive in many other country's too; like Australia.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 15, 2014 9:39 PM GMT
    waccamatt said
    tru_blu_ozzie saidWith America being the worlds largest Christian country, one doubts this is really true. But propaganda some will cling onto with false hope.

    I'm just grateful such things are not an issue in my life, even though I have never been marriage, and with the same man for well over 20 years.

    But then I may feel differently if I was disadvantage to have to call America home, and not Oz.


    America is not a Christian country. The majority of citizens are Christian, many in name only, but there are also large percentages of atheists and other religions.


    have you not heard Obama telling Americans that America is One nation Under God, thus a Christian County; the worlds largest at that.

    That also does not exclude America's minority religions either.