Do you like living in the Boston?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 01, 2014 8:05 PM GMT
    So I got into two schools, one in Boston and one in Cambridge.

    They're good schools but TBH, I'm really not excited about having to move to either city. I haven't really had a good time when I went to either in the past and I don't want to spend 3 years in a place what's not going to make me happy.

    I've also heard that they gays there are pretty bitchy and racist (Although I have absolutely zero experience with Boston gays save for a few I met on grindr in a hotel.)

    To be fair, I want to get a take on the livability and culture of these places from people who actually live there.

    Your thoughts?

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    Mar 01, 2014 9:57 PM GMT
    Just curious.. Why did you apply for a school in a city you hate?
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Mar 02, 2014 12:47 AM GMT
    I have no major complaints. Gays can be racist and bitchy anywhere.
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    Mar 02, 2014 4:02 AM GMT
    You ought to spend some more time there. Boston is a beautiful city. It's built on a human scale, with lots of lovely 18th and 19th century architecture. It has a superabundance of arts and music venues of all genres. Its people are disproportionately well-educated, diverse, and interesting to know. And it has a huge student population so there are lots of social opportunities, many of them free or geared to a student budget.
    I went to college and law school in Cambridge and Boston and look back on those years as among the richest experiences of my life.
    Only the weather sucks. Seasons in Boston consist of Fall, Early Winter, Winter, Late Winter, and Summer.
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    Mar 02, 2014 4:14 AM GMT
    I've been here almost 13 years and while it CAN be a great city and a great city to visit, I can't honestly say I love it here. As for gay guys, I've found from the very beginning that gay guys here are some of the hardest to "break" or get anywhere with. Seriously, any other city I've been to has been easier. Gay life is kinda pathetic for a city of this size (really only 4 full time gay bars/clubs). I've heard other people say basically these same things, but this is really just my opinion. Take it or leave it!
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Mar 02, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    DEKIRUMAN saidSo I got into two schools, one in Boston and one in Cambridge.

    They're good schools but TBH, I'm really not excited about having to move to either city. I haven't really had a good time when I went to either in the past and I don't want to spend 3 years in a place what's not going to make me happy.

    I've also heard that they gays there are pretty bitchy and racist (Although I have absolutely zero experience with Boston gays save for a few I met on grindr in a hotel.)

    To be fair, I want to get a take on the livability and culture of these places from people who actually live there.

    Your thoughts?



    Then why apply in the first place? Stop making excuses.
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    Mar 02, 2014 4:34 AM GMT
    coolarmydude said
    DEKIRUMAN saidSo I got into two schools, one in Boston and one in Cambridge.

    They're good schools but TBH, I'm really not excited about having to move to either city. I haven't really had a good time when I went to either in the past and I don't want to spend 3 years in a place what's not going to make me happy.

    I've also heard that they gays there are pretty bitchy and racist (Although I have absolutely zero experience with Boston gays save for a few I met on grindr in a hotel.)

    To be fair, I want to get a take on the livability and culture of these places from people who actually live there.

    Your thoughts?



    Then why apply in the first place? Stop making excuses.
    Keeping your options open is smart. I hate the town I'm going to school in. I would definitely change that 5 years ago, but if your education is worth more than a few years of sanity then it's their prerogative.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Mar 02, 2014 4:37 AM GMT
    Trolliosis said
    Keeping your options open is smart. I hate the town I'm going to school in. I would definitely change that 5 years ago, but if your education is worth more than a few years of sanity then it's their prerogative.


    But OP is the one implying closing the only two options he has. That's why I said to stop making excuses.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2014 4:38 AM GMT
    I have not lived there so my experiences would be limited to the times I have been there for job interviews, for work or passing through. I think the both cities are vibrant, you can see that people are educated and value education to a very high degree, along what is going on in their communities and the world at large, having said that...I found not all, but most Bostonians very racists - not just to the gay community, but if you are not Kennedy born and bred in the area you are an 'outsider'. In essence, if you can not tell them that you ancestors came from the Mayflower or settle in Boston from the 1800's - you are an outsider to them and you will be treated as such. They will tell you in some many words that you are not welcomed. Additionally, they are extremely protective or their economy..one time in a cab ride, the cab rider wanted to know, why I was there, who I was interviewing, and if I got the job and why I could not get a job in my state. Suffice to say I kept the conversation, brief but it felt like an interrogation. I then happened another time to have another cab driver who had just moved from NYC to Boston. I casually asked if he liked it in Boston and his impression differ from NYC, he confer my suspicious. He had regretted the move, he noted the same thing -extremely centered in their history and ancestry and if you did not originate from that you are treated differently and he noted he was just staying a couple more months and then moving back to New York.

    Congrats on school, make the best of it, and I think you can to find friends that feel the same way as you do.
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    Mar 02, 2014 8:31 AM GMT
    You're looking for in-state tuition?

    The school that's going to get a better job in the future is important. But, I'd look for a lower cost of living while in school.

    Being able to afford food and utilities is important.

    After you graduate: Gays love money almost as much as looks. I just don't think bitchy and racist is a regional thing.

    Hope you're pursuing a career path that gives flexibility to being able to live and afford a predominately gay area since, IMHO, we would rather sit at home and masturbate than get stuck in traffic on I-5.

    icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2014 12:49 PM GMT
    I loved living in Boston. I was a serial monogamist when I lived there, and had 3 bf's. 2 lived in cambridge, and the other near Southie. I lived in Fenway. The entire city is pretty walkable and connected; so I never felt like I was missing out on something b/c of location. People are really cool and open there. I hope you enjoy Boston as much as I did.
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    Mar 02, 2014 2:17 PM GMT
    Shawkwave said As for gay guys, I've found from the very beginning that gay guys here are some of the hardest to "break" or get anywhere with. Seriously, any other city I've been to has been easier.

    You may have a point there. If you come from somewhere else, New Englanders are going to seem reserved and stand-offish. I remember overhearing two visiting New Yorkers in a Boston club saying to each other, "This is like a roomful of virgins."
    But the OP will be a student and will be surrounded by other students. He'll have lots more options to mingle than just going to clubs.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14389

    Mar 02, 2014 2:54 PM GMT
    Don't judge a city or community just on its gay scene. Assimilate into the entire community and meet all kinds of people. Boston is a great city that just never seems to stop changing and reinventing itself. Its very expensive but than most big, major cities are expensive with the exceptions being Detroit and Buffalo. Boston is a very compact city bordered on by compact suburbs so you really do not need a car to get around. Most of Boston's suburbs are actually full fledged cities in their own right, Cambridge is one of them. If you are a history buff, than Boston and its surrounding environs is the place to be. We are talking about the nation's first metropolis. Boston became a major city well before New York and Philadelphia. So get to know the city and don't just restrict yourself to the gay scene. There is so much to discover so open yourself up to different experiences while you are in Boston.
  • Farmboy8

    Posts: 88

    Mar 02, 2014 3:29 PM GMT
    I lived near Boston for many years and still visit it often. I can't comment on the "gay scene", but I think it's unwise to form an opinion of a city based on: crabby cabbies (most of whom moved there from other parts of the world), visiting New Yorkers (deep history of dislike between the 2 cities).
    It is a city with many colleges and young professionals that give it an energy. A passionate city when it comes to its sports teams. A city with plenty of history and beautiful architecture. Plenty of neighborhoods that have distinct personalities but the scale of the city seems manageable, not intimidating. YES, the streets can get confusing to people and not everyone is "warm and fuzzy"......welcome to New England! It's not arrogance, like many people think, it's just that we lean towards being more private than many cities. As far as the comment about "if your not a Kennedy.....", that's just ignorant! Most Bostonians could give a rat's ass about the Kennedy's now. If someone has visited Boston and had a bad experience, I am truly sorry. There are bad people in any city you visit, but you need to see past that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2014 9:49 PM GMT

    Boston born and raised. It is a great city that is very proud of its history and all it has to offer. The majority of it is very diverse and there aren't really any areas that I would feel like I wouldn't want to be in after dark.

    As far as the gay scene it is small and quite lame for the size of the city, but clearly isn't your only motivation for moving here.

    This is a great thread as I never realized there were so many Bostonians on here.
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    Mar 03, 2014 6:13 PM GMT
    You should always make the best of what life presents you. Wherever you end up, go there with no, or little, expectations (good or bad). That will keep you from being disappointed.

    Boston and Cambridge both have much to offer. They are both made of collections of diverse neighborhoods (as are neighboring cities like Somerville or Brookline). What is cool is that there is quite a bit of diversity in a very small area. You can find almost a cuisine you want. And there is no shortage of gyms, fitness centers, yoga studios, etc.

    The T is so-so, they could really do a better job with it, but it will get you around, but sometimes, walking is just faster (and both are very walkable cities).

    Good luck.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 03, 2014 6:51 PM GMT
    Had I a choice, I would be in the Boston area right now. I feel very lucky to have lived there for a while. I have always thought of it as a thing person's town, accessible, and diverse. You just never knew who or what you might encounter. The place is dripping with history and is full of people who have learned to be straightforward and independent. Dour and reserved? Well, yes, but also wonderfully forthcoming when you take the time to learn their ways. Can't think of a much more stimulating and interesting educational atmosphere. There are also wonderful working people of every stripe and trade, many ethnic communities and enormously rich cultural venues.

    When I worked there the janitor in our company spoke seven languages and was a political activist. He was just one of of dozens of fascinating stories there. Other workers were among the very best in their field and some of them were more approachable than others, but all were multi-faceted and bright.

    Part of a good education is experiencing a rich environment and Boston certainly has that to offer.
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    Mar 03, 2014 6:55 PM GMT
    I work in Cambridge, but live in Watertown. I have lived in the Boston area now for 24 years. I like it.

    Bill
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    Mar 03, 2014 9:20 PM GMT
    I go to grad school in BOS but choose to continue living in New Hampshire and commute, so I understand your hesitance. I have never seen the racist side of the gay scene here you mention, but as a general statement the gay scene leaves a lot to be desired compared to DC for example. But the schools are world class, a ton of diversity in Cambridge and great places to run, workout ect. As a runner, my take is that BOS is the easiest big city on the east coast to safely run in. Hope this helps.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 03, 2014 10:11 PM GMT
    Omg I loved it. Boston is an amazing city, you will honestly be happy is you live there. Only people I know to hate it, were die hard Yankee fans
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    Mar 03, 2014 10:12 PM GMT
    Also Boston is racist not the gay and Bostonians are assholes that's why were called massholes
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    Mar 04, 2014 8:41 PM GMT
    huhwhat saidI loved living in Boston. I was a serial monogamist when I lived there, and had 3 bf's. 2 lived in cambridge, and the other near Southie. I lived in Fenway. The entire city is pretty walkable and connected; so I never felt like I was missing out on something b/c of location. People are really cool and open there. I hope you enjoy Boston as much as I did.


    This sounds very positive! My next short term assignment (3 months) will be in Boston and I hope it's going to be a good experience.
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    Jun 02, 2014 3:56 AM GMT
    DEKIRUMAN saidSo I got into two schools, one in Boston and one in Cambridge....They're good schools but TBH, I'm really not excited about having to move to either city....Your thoughts?



    Hi, Just seeing this post. Wondering, have you made your decision? If you're still deciding, I would focus on the quality of the school you'll be attending, more than anything. Whether in Boston or Cambridge, you will find enough fun people to engage with you.

    FYI, I grew up in a small town in another part of the country and thought Bostonians were cold and rude when I first got here. Then, I realized that most of the people I thought were cold or rude were just busy going places or busy achieving their goals.

    There is incredible talent in this town. If you come to Boston, you will meet and mingle and learn from the best and brightest. If not now for that sort of learning, then when?

    I bet you will enjoy wherever you wind up. But, again curious, have you decided....!?
  • sharonjerome

    Posts: 3

    Jun 13, 2014 4:59 AM GMT
    Do you have any choice of not attending these schools,if you have then don't go to places that irritates you.
  • dj10001dj

    Posts: 21

    Jun 18, 2014 5:55 PM GMT
    Boston is a fun place if you're late teens early to mid 20's. When I lived there when I was 26 I felt old for the city. So many young people around EVERYWHERE.