Interesting thought experiment

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    Mar 01, 2014 9:38 PM GMT
    Interesting thought experiment:

    You are feeling the worst you ever felt, utterly hopeless, scared, and alone. Suddenly you're in a horrible accident. You wake up with no memories of the past, no concept of the future, no language skills, no concept of who you are what your body is, or even what common everyday objects are. Your every success, every failure, how you feel toward loved ones and enemies, your habits good and bad, your thoughts and beliefs about life, death, yourself and your potential all gone in an instant. Rebuilding from ground zero like a baby just being born. How would your life be different? How would you approach each day exploring this new, wonderful world? What bad habits just suddenly wouldn't be there? And how would you live your life with no boundaries or limits? Really imagine this happening and make it real. Because you don't have to be in some horrible accident to let go everything you thought you were to become who you have always wanted to be. It has always been there. Go out and discover it!
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    Mar 01, 2014 10:02 PM GMT
    If I had no memories inevitably I'd make the same mistakes again because I wouldn't remember learning from them first time round. On saying that I'd like to think I would be more confident if I had no memory of my father.
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    Mar 01, 2014 10:17 PM GMT
    Well here's the thing... every action you've ever taken, every response to a situation you've ever had, or belief or thought you've ever had about yourself, others, or the world was based off pre-existing programming. Every single person is simply operating off preexisting programming instilled from the time they were born. When you were born you came into this world with a blank slate and that slate was filled through programming by your parents, peers, and life. Therefore it is very possible you wouldn't have to repeat the SAME mistakes. By the way I hesitate to call a mistake a mistake. Really what it is is learning what not to do. Would you make some "mistakes" yes. But for the first time in your life you would finally be free of all the negative bullshit. All the things you told yourself you were or weren't, and everything you thought you were or weren't capable of. Everything would be curious and new to you, and you would explore and every day would be an adventure even the most mundane of situations. Wouldn't it be nice to have this attitude to a certain degree everyday? To be free of the past and free to live your life without limits? That is the point of this...
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    Mar 01, 2014 10:22 PM GMT
    Thom1993 saidIf I had no memories inevitably I'd make the same mistakes again because I wouldn't remember learning from them first time round. On saying that I'd like to think I would be more confident if I had no memory of my father.


    By the way having no memory of your father wouldn't make a difference, because whatever he did or didn't do that makes you say that, that emotion and those beliefs have since been nurtured and reflected in every single person you meet and everything you've ever had. That is if he is the original cause of the emotion or belief. So why don't you right now just let go. Forget what you're supposed to do or be, forget about your failures and success and approach life like a child does...bravely & naively without filters, judgments, or biases, open to learn and explore, to fall over and over again and by doing so learn how to walk. You don't have to get rid of the memory of your father. Rather just let it go and don't let it bias your perceptions and reactions to others and yourself any more.
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    Mar 01, 2014 10:32 PM GMT
    I don't know if it's possible to completely let go of something if you can remember it still ... Well unless I was hypnotised.
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    Mar 01, 2014 10:46 PM GMT
    Please don't be offended. I would say that what you just posted is irrelevant and also that I disagree with what you said(just don't feel like posting why b/c it doesn't matter in my opinion). The idea of this is not to get caught up in silly details, but rather vividly imagine this event occurring to you and how your life would be different approaching every day, person, and experience you had. This isn't something to just think about using logic or read very quickly without applying it, rather it is more of a meditation where you actually put yourself mentally and emotionally in that situation using all 5 senses, feeling those emotions and look at how your life would be different than take that knowledge and those feelings and carry them with you throughout the day living your life letting go of what doesn't serve you or holds you back, and being open to a new life filled with awe, wonder, and courage...
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    Mar 02, 2014 12:16 AM GMT
    It's a great idea though and the world would be a better place if people did drop their baggage its just seems to be impossible because our experiences form part of what we are - for better or worse.
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    Mar 03, 2014 8:47 AM GMT
    YourName2000 saidI'm going to put a twist on this.

    I've suffered from depression in the past, as many have, even to the point of thinking suicide. The "interesting thought experiment" that worked for me though is this:

    Killing yourself is indeed one way to rid yourself of all your "problems", but if it works, you won't be around to enjoy the results. If you're willing to "throw it all away", do so....kill your 'self' --that whole convoluted bundle of wrong thinking, bad habits, self-destructive societal programming, your dissatisfaction --all of it. Kill the 'self' that you'd become (the 'self' that isn't 'working'), but leave your body alone. Then pick out the pieces of your old life that were working, but leave the rest to rot. Even go so far as to have a mental 'wake' for that old you...bury him, keeping just your 'inheritance' of good things; and then start life anew.

    Nowadays, I personally think it's great to occasionally review your life and --if needed-- kill your 'self'; but never kill yourself. icon_wink.gif When I look back, I see 5 or 6 very distinct eras in my life where the person I became was wildly different from the person I was...so different, some of those 'people' wouldn't even recognize each other.


    Very very wise and inspiring. You're a champ man!
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    Mar 03, 2014 3:54 PM GMT
    AlligatorSky said...When you were born you came into this world with a blank slate and that slate was filled through programming by your parents, peers, and life. Therefore it is very possible you wouldn't have to repeat the SAME mistakes....


    "If I could do it all over again, I'd make a whole different set of mistakes."~~saying

    Your premise is wrong and so you have to go back, correct that, and then reevaluate every step you drew from that.

    We certainly are not born entirely as blank slates, rather we are born, in part, with certain structures, thus people exhibit even varying degrees of personality disorder which is structural not necessarily programmed after the fact.

    For instance:

    http://www.livescience.com/39904-why-psychopaths-lack-empathy.html

    When the highly psychopathic individuals imagined the accidents happening to themselves, their brains lit up in the anterior insula, the anterior midcingulate cortex, the somatosensory cortex and the right amygdala — all areas involved in empathy. The response was quite pronounced, suggesting psychopathic individuals were sensitive to thoughts of pain.

    But when the highly psychopathic inmates imagined the accident happening to others, their brains failed to light up in the regions associated with empathy. In fact, an area involved in pleasure, the ventral striatum, lit up instead. Furthermore, these individuals showed abnormal connectivity between the insula and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area important for empathetic decision-making.

    By contrast, the less psychopathic individuals showed more normal brain activation and connectivity in these areas.

    The strange patterns of brain activation and connectivity in highly psychopathic individuals suggest they did not experience empathy when imagining the pain of others, and possibly took pleasure in it


    Also there was another thread recently looking at studies of a baby's sense of morality which suggests structural preprogramming, hardware, not software.

    Those types of aspects are interesting too because they seem to question free will, giving rise to debate whether all our decisions are predetermined, that you could only have made the decisions that you made, regardless of what circumstances life throws your way.