How to get an athletic body (vs a gym body)

  • theonewhoknoc...

    Posts: 713

    Mar 03, 2014 5:44 AM GMT
    I've been working out for a couple years now, and I'm worried that I'm developing a "gym body". It's kind of a barrel-type torso - thick but not wide. I have fairly little body fat, even got a six pack, but it appears glued on the surface like a wallpaper lmao. My pecs are large but not well defined. My shoulders are also a bit narrow, which doesn't help the overall proportions, so I do shoulder exercises a lot. Overall this wasn't the kind of body I had in mind.

    I want to have the body of an athlete, rather than someone who just lifts weights, but do I really have to do a real sport lol?
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    Mar 04, 2014 3:42 AM GMT
    If you want to look like an athlete, you have to train like an athlete.
    Work the body in multiple planes, perform compound movements, hit all aspects of the core including the back and transverse abdominus, and don't forget balance.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Mar 04, 2014 4:02 AM GMT
    swim!
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    Mar 04, 2014 4:04 AM GMT
    We need pics so we can critique icon_smile.gif
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Mar 04, 2014 4:06 AM GMT
    art-SWIMMER3-620x349.jpg
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    Mar 04, 2014 4:16 AM GMT
    Aussie Aussie Aussie! ;)


    ThatSwimmerGuy saidart-SWIMMER3-620x349.jpg
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    Mar 04, 2014 4:18 AM GMT
    Crossfit

    Look at Rich Froning, well known Crossfitter:

    richjami-576x384.jpg

    I'm working on it. icon_smile.gif
  • jock_n_ca

    Posts: 148

    Mar 04, 2014 4:32 AM GMT
    I've spent the majority of my time outside the gym. If you workout exclusively in the gym you're gonna have a bod built for the gym. Swim, run, ride, whatever…just do it.
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    Mar 04, 2014 5:11 AM GMT
    Rockbiter saidCrossfit

    Look at Rich Froning, well known Crossfitter:

    richjami-576x384.jpg

    I'm working on it. icon_smile.gif


    Actually, that looks very gym body-ish. Muscles are big but don't seem especially functional.

    Honestly, I think you just have to do a sport. If it's a matter of achieving a certain look, pick a sport whose athletes you admire and do that sport. Swimming will make you look like a swimmer, distance running will make you look like a distance runner, rowing will make you look like a rower...all have "athletic" bodies, but they may not be all to your taste.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Mar 04, 2014 2:33 PM GMT
    I recommend a well-rounded approach:

    1) Swim - great for your heart/lungs and building stamina; low-impact. Not great for building muscle, but overall benefits can last a lifetime.

    2) Run - if you don't have any injuries, that is. If running on asphalt is too hard on your legs, try running on single-track trails in the woods. Trail running builds lots of micro-stabilizer muscles in your legs. In general, running is good for your heart/lungs, and as a weight-bearing exercise, it can be beneficial to your bones. It can also hurt you if your body mechanics aren't good, or if you overdo it, however.

    3) Lift - weights are good, but be sure to focus on form. More weight isn't always better, especially when it forces you to compromise your form. Make sure you're lifting correctly.

    4) Stretch/do yoga - this is really important. When you get older, flexibility will be much more important than muscle mass. It's good for your joints and your balance.

    5) Eat good foods - eat a healthy mix of things. The fresher the better. Don't overload on protein or fall into fad diets.

    6) Get lots of rest - this is really important. Listen to your body. Take time off if you need to. A good night of sleep can mend a lot of the little aches and pains that you develop while training.


    Keep in mind that getting an athletic body that will serve you well over time is not something that you attain in a few months, but something consistently built over years.
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    Mar 04, 2014 3:08 PM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI recommend a well-rounded approach:

    1) Swim - great for your heart/lungs and building stamina; low-impact. Not great for building muscle, but overall benefits can last a lifetime.

    2) Run - if you don't have any injuries, that is. If running on asphalt is too hard on your legs, try running on single-track trails in the woods. Trail running builds lots of micro-stabilizer muscles in your legs. In general, running is good for your heart/lungs, and as a weight-bearing exercise, it can be beneficial to your bones. It can also hurt you if your body mechanics aren't good, or if you overdo it, however.

    3) Lift - weights are good, but be sure to focus on form. More weight isn't always better, especially when it forces you to compromise your form. Make sure you're lifting correctly.

    4) Stretch/do yoga - this is really important. When you get older, flexibility will be much more important than muscle mass. It's good for your joints and your balance.

    5) Eat good foods - eat a healthy mix of things. The fresher the better. Don't overload on protein or fall into fad diets.

    6) Get lots of rest - this is really important. Listen to your body. Take time off if you need to. A good night of sleep can mend a lot of the little aches and pains that you develop while training.


    Keep in mind that getting an athletic body that will serve you well over time is not something that you attain in a few months, but something consistently built over years.




    I just started doing all of the above ... again lol

    Lets see what happens !

    Tanti baci xoxo
  • theonewhoknoc...

    Posts: 713

    Mar 05, 2014 5:38 AM GMT
    Are there any before/after pics of guys with less-than-ideal frames, who, through working out, ended up with broad shoulders, big forearms, etc etc?

    So far in all the before/after success photos I've seen, the guy even if he was a twig, has always had a good frame to begin with; and when they didn't have a good frame, their muscular self was very gym-body-ish.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Mar 05, 2014 1:59 PM GMT
    theonewhoknocks saidAre there any before/after pics of guys with less-than-ideal frames, who, through working out, ended up with broad shoulders, big forearms, etc etc?

    So far in all the before/after success photos I've seen, the guy even if he was a twig, has always had a good frame to begin with; and when they didn't have a good frame, their muscular self was very gym-body-ish.


    I'm not sure if I'd get hung up on that--my firm belief is that you commit to a life-long lifestyle of being fit in a healthy and well-rounded way and the rest will follow. Like I said in my previous post, becoming athletic isn't measured in quick results, and certainly not determined by things like arm size.
  • theonewhoknoc...

    Posts: 713

    Mar 06, 2014 3:53 AM GMT
    My collarbones are very short - not even 5 inches - and they curve up to the shoulders sharper than most people. I wonder if I screwed myself as a child reading books in bed while resting on my elbows, lol...
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    Mar 06, 2014 3:58 AM GMT
    In my opinion some of the best sports for that ''athletic'' body type would be gymnastics, swimming, wall climbing.

    Key element is core training (deep core, not just abs), and you'll get that body type.

    Check out functional workouts and movement training by guys like Ido Portal or Naudi Aguilar.

    Practice handstands, squats, crawls, movements that our bodies were meant to do. We were not conditioned to lift 300 lbs bench press ;)
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    Mar 06, 2014 5:17 AM GMT
    I swim and lift light weights, focusing on areas that are essential for swimming i.e. shoulders, triceps. When I was a runner I was skinny as a stick no matter how much I ate or lifted weights. Of course, I've never lifted weights just to lift weights, it's always served a purpose--to enhance my sports performance. I'm digging my swimmer's build.

    I agree with the others that said train like an athlete to look like an athlete.
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    Mar 06, 2014 1:11 PM GMT
    here's a question ? How long should i be swimming? I usaly go for about a half hr? but every other day or so.

    How much time should i devote to swimming?
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Mar 06, 2014 2:07 PM GMT
    src123 saidhere's a question ? How long should i be swimming? I usaly go for about a half hr? but every other day or so.

    How much time should i devote to swimming?


    It depends on what you want to accomplish. If you're swimming for all-round fitness, my advice is to mix it up (otherwise you might get bored with it).

    If you're not coming from a competitive swimming background, it might take some time to get accustomed to doing sets/intervals, but you can find lots of workouts online that suit your level of ability. Just google "swim workouts for beginners" or "swim workouts for intermediate swimmers" and you'll find lots to pick from.

    While just swimming laps continuously has benefits, it can become a really static activity. Doing intervals and other variations in your workout will get your heart rate up and will engage different muscle fibers and muscle groups. And you can do all that in your 30-minute swims.
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    Mar 06, 2014 2:38 PM GMT
    Thanks Dan I have been mixing it up a bit between free,breast, back and intermediate backstroke. not really a fan of fly lol

    Thanks for the advice lol duh use the internet icon_redface.gif

    xoxoxox tanti baci
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    Mar 07, 2014 12:44 PM GMT
    Dan is right. I mix it up. (Actually, he just reminded me that I haven't been doing that lately.) And if you're not doing it already, I'd throw in at least two weight training days.
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    Mar 07, 2014 1:04 PM GMT
    Could someone post a picture of what they consider a "gym body"? icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 07, 2014 1:24 PM GMT
    Google images has a good representation of what I think is a gym body.
  • theonewhoknoc...

    Posts: 713

    Mar 17, 2014 5:29 AM GMT
    AFGGiK5.png

    This isn't me, but I have almost the same kind of body, unfortunately. Why does it look so gay lol?
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    Mar 17, 2014 5:48 AM GMT
    2a83ts5.png

    I'm pretty sure this guy does things other than swimming, but in general swimmers have great bodies. Abs aren't even necessary to look that good. I try to even out my time lifting in the gym and running and swimming to get the best of both worlds.
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    Apr 01, 2014 11:05 PM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI recommend a well-rounded approach:

    1) Swim - great for your heart/lungs and building stamina; low-impact. Not great for building muscle, but overall benefits can last a lifetime.

    2) Run - if you don't have any injuries, that is. If running on asphalt is too hard on your legs, try running on single-track trails in the woods. Trail running builds lots of micro-stabilizer muscles in your legs. In general, running is good for your heart/lungs, and as a weight-bearing exercise, it can be beneficial to your bones. It can also hurt you if your body mechanics aren't good, or if you overdo it, however.

    3) Lift - weights are good, but be sure to focus on form. More weight isn't always better, especially when it forces you to compromise your form. Make sure you're lifting correctly.

    4) Stretch/do yoga - this is really important. When you get older, flexibility will be much more important than muscle mass. It's good for your joints and your balance.

    5) Eat good foods - eat a healthy mix of things. The fresher the better. Don't overload on protein or fall into fad diets.

    6) Get lots of rest - this is really important. Listen to your body. Take time off if you need to. A good night of sleep can mend a lot of the little aches and pains that you develop while training.


    Keep in mind that getting an athletic body that will serve you well over time is not something that you attain in a few months, but something consistently built over years.


    That sounds cool. I'm just starting.