Bursitis in both shoulders

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    Mar 03, 2014 6:30 PM GMT
    Does anyone have any experience with this, and how you able to adapt exercise around it?
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    Mar 04, 2014 12:52 AM GMT
    Yes I have it in my left shoulder. A total bitch to get rid of and you should get some good help before you wreck your shoulders more. Except for physio, you should most likely lay off any strength training for a while.
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    Mar 04, 2014 2:00 AM GMT
    There is a plant called Comfrey. If you can find it (sometimes the leaves can be found in health food stores), boil about 1 quart of water and add about 2 tablespoons of the leaves (chopped) and let it set until cool. It will look like tea. Take a washcloth and make a compress out of the "tea" and place it on your shoulder. It will help.
    I had a ruptured bursa in my knee. I did this and was back about 90% in 3 weeks. Physical Therapist said it should have taken 6-8 weeks.
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    Mar 04, 2014 2:13 AM GMT
    Andaman saidDoes anyone have any experience with this, and how you able to adapt exercise around it?

    Last month my husband had a diagnosis of possible bursitis in 1 shoulder. X-rays showed no arthritis or spurs, a definitive cause of the pain not established, so the orthopedic specialist gave him a cortisone injection into the joint (largely painless), which caused immediate relief that continues today. If the pain returns the next step will be MRI studies.

    Have you had a diagnosis of bursitis? If not I recommend you see a doctor, for a possible referral to an orthopedic specialist.
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    Mar 04, 2014 2:22 AM GMT
    Are you sure it isn't just weight lifters shoulder or an imbalance? Try doing shoulder rotations and front and side lateral raises. A lot of us focus on the big muscles and forget all the little muscles, tendons and ligaments that support them. You've got to work them as well.
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    Mar 04, 2014 3:20 AM GMT
    It is very definitely bursitis. I had investigational ultrasound, as I do with all soft-tissue problems, as it is the ONLY way to factually verify what the problem is, and the ONLY way to ensure that an injection goes into the right place. I have had useless injections from doctors who did not use it and assumed they knew where to put it. The inflammation can be in a different place from the pain. So, I had injections, which helped a little, but not enough, not permanently.
    I have to carry grocery bags a couple of times a week, and I seem to be able to tolerate that dead hang, and I flex my arms slightly. If I flex them more than 25 percent or so, the biceps tendons will inflame. I used to swim, but that was prolonging the problem.
    I have had physical therapy, and that is rarely helpful. I found some information online that may work better if I apply it. If I could afford a sophisticated trainer or something, it would help, perhaps. I think having gentle massage immediately after exercise could relieve it better. Serious massages do not help at all!
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    Mar 04, 2014 3:21 AM GMT
    Comfrey is not a bad idea. The British call it Knitbone. It is the source of allantoin. There could be some risks with it, but I will see if I can find some teabags, at least. I think it has been off the market for some time. I used to drink comfrey tea, back in the 1980s.
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    Mar 04, 2014 3:25 AM GMT
    Thank you, guys.
    I am also considering pursuing Feldenkrais training, because I believe in movement therapy as opposed to exercise therapy, and I think it should be the core of physical therapy. Corrective movements are different and less apt to cause strain. If the injury was caused by improper movements, it seems sensible to use corrective movements to reverse it, as that is its origin. Exercise would treat results, not the origin of the injury. If you don't learn to move better, you are liable to injure it again.
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    Mar 04, 2014 8:52 AM GMT
    Have you seen an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in shoulders? Not suggesting that any surgery would be helpful, but these are about the only docs out there who see enough shoulders to actually know exactly what is wrong and what might be done for it. Sometimes a steroid injection in exactly the right place, followed by prescribed exercises can eliminate or reduce shoulder pain where there is not a reparable tear.
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    Mar 05, 2014 2:01 AM GMT
    Andaman saidComfrey is not a bad idea. The British call it Knitbone. It is the source of allantoin. There could be some risks with it, but I will see if I can find some teabags, at least. I think it has been off the market for some time. I used to drink comfrey tea, back in the 1980s.

    Yes there risks are if taken internally and if you drank tea from about 9,000 leaves ;)
    I do not drink it I just use it as a topical treatment. It is wonderous stuff for keeping the joints moving.
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    Mar 05, 2014 8:01 PM GMT
    The last physical therapist suggested arthroscopic surgery after he was unable to help me. (Or just unwilling to do what it takes.) I have had injections with ultrasound guidance, which is the only way I would do it. It is just a pocket of fluid that presses against the biceps tendon. The injections did reduce it enough to stop the nerve problems for the most part, and to eliminate the pain in the a1c joints. So maybe I will do a couple more in a few months and maybe that will do the trick at last. Softening my muscle fibers is a whole other question, because my deltoids have been like rocks. Holding weights while lifting my shoulders or bringing them back did not help. I think if someone held my arm back and then gently massaged my deltoids, it might help.
    I don't know how much you can do to change the texture of a muscle.
    I did have problems with my skeletal back muscles, so I did learn about the problems from having an imbalance between layers of muscles.
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    Mar 07, 2014 1:21 AM GMT
    I asked in the Vitamin store about comfrey, and the manager said that all the suppliers who were growing turned out to have a toxic variety. Doesn't sound promising.
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    Mar 11, 2014 6:03 PM GMT
    Not lifting, but holding, carrying moderate weight seems to be the only possible arm exercise. I have wondered if combining massage and exercise can help, but probably not without NSAIDS.