How do organize my workout (weekly)? Tips appreciated!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 22, 2008 11:16 PM GMT
    I've finally settled on a routine that was recommended to me by several members of RealJock, that being:

    Monday: Biceps/Triceps
    Tuesday: Chest/Shoulder
    Wed: Break (rest; 30min+ cardio)
    Thursday: Back/Lats
    Friday: Biceps/Triceps

    Weekend: rest/mixed cardio/legs



    Feel free to tweak and/or suggest any additional activities you feel I should integrate into my routine.

    My main goal is to increase muscle volume, where-as prior I was working out 5 days a week, full body (i.e., the same body parts in each workout, every time). I was told that over training would defeat my goal of increasing muscle size, therefore I've decided to break down each body part into separate days--good idea?


    What can I do to increase bicep/tricep size, any specific exercise (with reps/sets) you'd recommend? Thanks!
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Dec 22, 2008 11:36 PM GMT
    Um...

    Where's the legs?

    If volume is your goal, you should be living in the squat rack. Squats, rows, deads, bench.
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    Dec 23, 2008 2:21 AM GMT
    yeah, what about your legs?
    You look stupid with this big upper body and twiggy legs...
    Top heavy like... never a good look...
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Dec 23, 2008 2:38 AM GMT
    Oh, whoops, durr, they're on the weekend.

    But, "legs" and "rest" should NOT be used in the same sentence!

    If your goal is hypertrophy, do you have a reason why you're doing a 4-day split body instead of an HST program?
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    Dec 23, 2008 5:58 AM GMT
    Day 1:
    Primary - Back and Biceps
    Secondary - Calves

    Day 2:
    Primary - Chest and Triceps
    Secondary - Abs

    Day 3:
    Primary - Quads
    Secondary - Forearms

    Day 4:
    Primary - Shoulders
    Secondary - Calves

    Day 5:
    Primary - Hamstrings
    Secondary - Abs

    Day 6:
    Primary - Triceps and Biceps
    Secondary - Forearms

    Day 7: rest and beat off
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    Dec 23, 2008 6:22 AM GMT
    For your biceps and triceps, there's two things you can do:
    1) use synthol, or
    2) listen to me

    What you'll want to do is keep your reps high and your weight low. You'll want to do a minimum of four sets and at least 12 reps per set.

    Start off with triceps:
    - Triceps dip, two warm-up sets (weight assisted) plus four sets, as many reps as you can get (you'll be lucky to get 8 on these)
    - Overhead triceps extension, four sets, 12 reps minimum, get them pumped up, and for your last set, blast out as many reps as you can until you can't lift anymore. To do this lift, stand up, hold the weight in one hand behind your head, and lift up. Your upper arm should remain vertical while you lift the weight.
    - Triceps pushdown, four sets, for your last set, hit as many reps as you can until you can't lift anymore.
    - Triceps kickback, four set, go until you can't lift anymore on the last set.

    Biceps:
    - Incline curls, six sets, remember to curl your wrist as you come up in order to ensure developing a peak. Lift until you can't lift anymore.
    - Hammer curls, four sets, lift until you can't lift anymore.

    Remember to EAT or you will see ZERO gains and end up over-training.
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    Dec 23, 2008 4:00 PM GMT
    Thanks Flex, definitely some good advice.

    As a side, I work on my legs throughout the regiment, I should've mentioned that.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Dec 23, 2008 9:32 PM GMT
    Flex, what's the training theory and research support behind that approach? I'm particularly wondering why two of the vitals (Back and Chest) for volume gains (the OP's goal) are with two other things, and only trained once per week, when you have *forearms* twice, calves twice, tris twice. Where do squats go?
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    Dec 24, 2008 4:28 AM GMT
    UFJocknerdFlex, what's the training theory and research support behind that approach? I'm particularly wondering why two of the vitals (Back and Chest) for volume gains (the OP's goal) are with two other things, and only trained once per week, when you have *forearms* twice, calves twice, tris twice. Where do squats go?


    Squats go with quads, because they work your quads. In fact, that's the first exercise I do for quads.

    One of the key ideas behind the approach is maximizing recovery for your larger muscle masses. Calves, forearms, and abs tend to recover much faster than your larger muscle groups like your lats and pecs, but especially your hamstrings and quads. Giving a full week of recovery for these areas ensures your muscle mass is largely rebuilt before you started tearing it down again.

    The key factors in controlling muscle growth are the chemical, myostatin, and the muscle casing. When you lift light at high reps, you force large amounts of blood into the muscle, stretching the muscle casing (or fascia) beyond its normal point, and it encourages a higher rate of hypertrophy (i.e. it's makes your muscles grow like weeds) because of the added room into which your muscles can grow.

    To really leverage any of this, you must also be eating a large amount of calories, or you will lose your gains and ultimately over-train.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Dec 24, 2008 4:46 AM GMT
    flex89 said

    Squats go with quads, because they work your quads. In fact, that's the first exercise I do for quads.

    One of the key ideas behind the approach is maximizing recovery for your larger muscle masses. Calves, forearms, and abs tend to recover much faster than your larger muscle groups like your lats and pecs, but especially your hamstrings and quads. Giving a full week of recovery for these areas ensures your muscle mass is largely rebuilt before you started tearing it down again.

    The key factors in controlling muscle growth are the chemical, myostatin, and the muscle casing. When you lift light at high reps, you force large amounts of blood into the muscle, stretching the muscle casing (or fascia) beyond its normal point, and it encourages a higher rate of hypertrophy (i.e. it's makes your muscles grow like weeds) because of the added room into which your muscles can grow.

    To really leverage any of this, you must also be eating a large amount of calories, or you will lose your gains and ultimately over-train.


    Squats work considerably more than your quads. They engage the glutes, hams, calves, and half your back. King of the lifts, baby. If someone wants to get wider squats should be a major emphasis in the program.

    Again, just not getting your program. A week between chest workouts? That's not recovery; it's atrophy. There's no need to wait for the muscle to return to mint condition before working it again (particularly if you're doing something like a medium-low-high three-day-a-week pattern). Even if you did, muscle recovery is mostly done after 72 hours.

    The routine is pretty out of step with what hypertrophy-specific programs usually look like (e.g. http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hst1.htm).
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    Dec 24, 2008 10:05 PM GMT
    The bodybuilding.com article states the adaptive response can happen in as little as 48 hours. This simply means you're gonna be hurting for at least 48 hours before your muscle rebuilds, and you may hurt for as long as five days after working your legs hard.

    Any one of the big guys will tell you it's not necessary to work a part of your body more than once a week. No one can really maintain an HST program working out with a twice-a-week cycle and expect to make significant gains without supplementing. One of the biggest risks involved with intense training without adequate rest is you drop your testosterone levels to near zero, which will result in severe over-training and you will lose all your gains (this is also called "atrophy").

    As for the squats, they are a compound exercise focusing primarily on your quadriceps, in the same manner that dumbbell bench press is a compound exercise focusing primarily on your pectoralis major and secondarily on your anterior deltoids, triceps, and pectoralis minor. Stiff-legged deadlifts are also a compound exercise in that they also work out your erectors and gluteus maximus, but are primarily hamstrings; thus, they are part of the hamstrings workout for the same reason squats are in the quads workout.