Can You Conduct Daily Life Without Cell Phones?

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    Mar 06, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    SO attached to their cellphones are 18- to 24-year-olds that 61 percent of them sleep next to their devices, compared with just 22 percent of cellphone owners over 65 who do so, according to the Pew Research Center. While that might depress those who yearn for simpler times, such devotion delights AT&T, and now the phone carrier is introducing a major effort that highlights how connected young Americans are to their devices.

    Can you have a life without it?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/06/business/media/examining-a-generation-tied-to-smartphones.html?ref=technology
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Mar 06, 2014 8:58 PM GMT
    Yes, easily.

    Life without them is slower, more thoughtful, and humane.

    The benefits of isolation are underestimated!
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    Mar 06, 2014 9:00 PM GMT
    Lincsbear saidYes, easily.

    Life without them is slower, more thoughtful, and humane.

    The benefits of isolation are underestimated!


    We don't have one, or really need one. We've been considering it, though, for emergencies, like power outages.

  • metta

    Posts: 39159

    Mar 06, 2014 9:01 PM GMT
    ^
    If you decide to get one....I'm not sure if Canada has the same thing, but look at the ones where you buy the prepaid minutes without any monthly fees. I have saved thousands of dollars by doing it this way. And be aware that the minutes you do buy may expire. If they do, just purchase what you think you might need before they expire.

    I don't like using my cell phone...so yes, I could do fine without it.

    I think it is really bad when you go to a business and the person at the front desk is too busy texting to help you. Some people have gotten way out of hand.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Mar 07, 2014 2:35 AM GMT
    No land line here, and I keep my cell turned off most of the time. Friends e-mail me, and then I have time to respond if I want and/or after thinking.

    Who need a phone? Life without one gives time for so much else, and with some actual planning, a phone of any kind is rarely needed.
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    Mar 07, 2014 2:44 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidSO attached to their cellphones are 18- to 24-year-olds that 61 percent of them sleep next to their devices, compared with just 22 percent of cellphone owners over 65 who do so, according to the Pew Research Center. While that might depress those who yearn for simpler times, such devotion delights AT&T, and now the phone carrier is introducing a major effort that highlights how connected young Americans are to their devices.

    Can you have a life without it?

    I lived the first 41 years of my life without a cell phone, until 1990. But then I also lived for years without color TV, only B&W when I was kid, and I survived that, too. I like color better. Also lived without a home computer for 34 years. Now it's my instant connection to the world, and the best creative tool I have.

    And I'm one of that 22% of 65-year-olds who has his cell phone next to his bed at night. But then I had a conventional residential night table telephone before that. I want to be able to make an emergency call at night if needed, and at my age it's more needed than ever. Cell next to my bed or residential phone, what's the difference?

    So I don't see the issue. I'm ABLE to conduct my daily life without a cell phone, but the cell makes it easier. And in future years something will make it even easier. I'm confident I know how to exploit new technology, without the technology exploiting or controlling me.
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Mar 07, 2014 3:33 PM GMT
    No
    In my industry I had a pager in HS. It unfortunately is all about being accessible to customers. I do take 2-3 weeks off either in the woods camping or on a cruise. I'm not paying what it costs to make a phone call or check email on a ship.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 07, 2014 3:34 PM GMT
    My work stuff is connected to my phone and I got rid of my land line 6 months ago. So its the only phone I have.
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    Mar 07, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    I used my cell phone a few days ago, and that was the first time I used it in weeks. It's one of those things I don't understand about today and why people have to constantly be in contact with one another 24/7 or staring into their cells, texting, or whatever. When I'm driving I see people walking around the streets using their phones, and they're driving using their phones or texting. In stores, movie theaters, the doctor's office, and restaurants they're all talking on their phones, even pumping their gas.

    I was in a restaurant the other day, and this couple were both staring into their phones and never talked to one another. And the guys at the gym can't take one hour of alone time to workout. They're talking and texting. My pet peeve is trying to have a conversation with someone who is texting or accepts a call on their cell.

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    Mar 07, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    I could live with out mine as i dont have that many numbers on it and it isnt really much of use to me. I prefer to talk face to face with people, but as the way things go you need one because everyone else is using one and thats the way people are forced in to using one as they make it the only way.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 07, 2014 3:49 PM GMT
    A second to Metta8's suggestion about a prepaid cell phone. As long as I add to it before the minutes expire, my T-Mobile prepaid minutes just lapse over from year to year. For the small amount I use the phone, about $35 per year does the trick.

    I keep my land line and its answering device for anyone who wants to call and only give out the cell number to my family and very closest friends. I carry it with me when I leave the house just in case something happens.

    Remembering times when you had to get up and go into the other room to get to the phone helps me to maintain some balance in the face of intrusive technology.

    I imagine that young ffolks these days would strip gears if they had to place long distance calls as we did when I was young. You called the operator and gave the number you wanted and then hung up an waited while the connection was made. When the call went through, the operator would call you back and you could talk to the person you were calling. It was not unusual to wait for 15-30 minutes. Times do change.

  • bischero

    Posts: 847

    Mar 07, 2014 4:00 PM GMT
    Absolutely not. I'm dependent upon it to help with my work.
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    Mar 07, 2014 4:03 PM GMT
    Yes absolutely. I often keep myself away from my cell phones. I deserve time with just myself.
  • Karl

    Posts: 5787

    Mar 07, 2014 4:06 PM GMT
    yes, if I have a tablet with internet connection.
    other cases : no icon_sad.gif
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    Mar 07, 2014 4:55 PM GMT
    Life without it would be annoying..a day absolutely.At 42 I remember life without cell phones and computers and I enjoyed myself plenty.icon_smile.gif Ry
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    Mar 08, 2014 2:46 PM GMT
    I'm definitely fond of my devices, but from 9pm to 6am, the phones may as well not even exist because they're set to automatically go into silent mode (the Panasonic DECT phone has that ability built in, and on Android, I use a free app called Silent Time.)
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    Mar 08, 2014 3:01 PM GMT
    Draper saidI used my cell phone a few days ago, and that was the first time I used it in weeks. It's one of those things I don't understand about today and why people have to constantly be in contact with one another 24/7 or staring into their cells, texting, or whatever.


    I agree full heartedly.

    I have one of the pay-as-you-go phones since I don't use it regularly. However, I am one of those that sleep with it next to me because I'm first on the emergency call list for work should our security alarm go off.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Mar 08, 2014 3:23 PM GMT
    Sure I can. I grew up in the 60s and 70s and there were no cellphones back then. People of all ages were friendlier and more close knit. Now these younger guys especially can't seem to do without the damned things. One time when I was walking in my neighborhood watching were I was going, I almost got ran into by a young woman on her cellphone texting away. I yelled at her to get off the stupid cellphone and watch where the hell she was going and that you don't have any legitimate reason or right to be on-line 24/7. Start paying attention to your current situation and turn off that stupid phone. But most 18-24 year olds today are a lost cause.icon_sad.gificon_mad.gif
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    Mar 08, 2014 10:55 PM GMT
    Here's the first home phone I remember. As a little kid if I had to call I was told to dial "O" and wait for the operator to say "Number please." Then I said something like "Clifford 6, 7777" to get my mother's or fathers's offices. I never called my schoolmates at home, little kids just didn't do that back then.

    th?id=HN.608017083979662257&pid=15.1

    And when I went to the kids movie matinee and needed a ride home, I used a candlestick pay phone booth for a nickel that looked like this:

    _57_zpsf4f5a9a7.jpg

    I couldn't find a pic that showed the wooden booth this would have been in, with a little bench seat.

    But in any case, this was my world. So can you understand what smart phones are like to me? I very much doubt you can.

    But my older husband & I have adapted to them quite well, I think. And have learned how to exploit them, without them exploiting us.

    And if WE see their advantages, and know how to maximize their pluses, I wonder why younger guys here are having issues with them? I begin to think it's more arbitrary personal & philosophical issues than practical.
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    Mar 08, 2014 11:08 PM GMT
    I think people harp on cell phones way too much. If they really were so full of vice and offered no benefits, then they would not have gotten as popular. Technology has always changed society (& will continue to do so long after cell phones fall out of grace). People who don't like cell phones tend not to use them as much (if at all); it's as simple as that.
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    Mar 08, 2014 11:11 PM GMT
    ART_DECO saidHere's the first home phone I remember. As a little kid if I had to call I was told to dial "O" and wait for the operator to say "Number please." Then I said something like "Clifford 6, 7777" to get my mother's or fathers's offices. I never called my schoolmates at home, little kids just didn't do that back then.

    th?id=HN.608017083979662257&pid=15.1


    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
    My parents had one like that next to their bed, and in the living room we had a wall one like this. It was impossible to make personal calls. Sometimes I'd sneak up into their room to use the phone. When we made local calls we only dialed the last five numbers. Outside of the local area there were the other two numbers, and long distance you'd dial the area code, and then all the numbers that followed that. You couldn't buy phones. The phone company owned them and part of the phone bill was a rental fee.
    XSWVUBQFBMYRJFB.JPG
  • jock_n_ca

    Posts: 148

    Mar 08, 2014 11:16 PM GMT
    I could live with out it personally but professionally? No way.
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    Mar 09, 2014 12:06 AM GMT
    I'm addicted to email and like feeling "connected".
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    Mar 09, 2014 5:27 AM GMT
    Sigh, I miss the good ol days where you can actually memorize and remember your immediate family's, your cousins' or best friends' numbers and make a call at the next convenient telephone booth.
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    Mar 09, 2014 6:11 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidSO attached to their cellphones are 18- to 24-year-olds that 61 percent of them sleep next to their devices, compared with just 22 percent of cellphone owners over 65 who do so, according to the Pew Research Center.

    Those over 65 are much more likely to have a land line phone sitting on the nightstand. I think it is likely that most people, whether it is a cell or a land line, do not sleep without some kind of phone in the bedroom. I don't have a land line, but always have the cell next to my bed. I would worry all night without it and not get one wink of sleep. What if someone breaks in the front door? What if there's a tornado or an earthquake and I end up trapped in the bedroom? What if a dam bursts? What if there's a fire and I had to jump out the window and the phone was at the other side of the house? What if somebody I am close to dies or is in an accident? What if the chemical plant has a toxic leak and the police are calling everyone in the area to tell them to seal their doors and windows?