upper arm pain

  • seafrontbloke

    Posts: 300

    Mar 09, 2014 5:26 PM GMT
    I have taken up a kettle bell class, which I'm enjoying, but I am finding a lingering pain in my upper left arm (clearly it's the non-dominant side) (the class is Thursday and it's now Sunday and the pain is still there). I don't want to stop the exercise, as I have always acknowledged that my arms are puny (I only ever write ...) but was interested if the answer is

    a) stretching before or after
    b) lowering the intensity of the exercise
    c) different exercises
    d) more exercise to power through the pain

    Any thoughts?
  • topathlete

    Posts: 882

    Mar 09, 2014 6:26 PM GMT
    The pain could be where you feel it or it could be referred pain meaning the origin is at a different location. The pain could result from a sore muscle or there could be some connective tissue impairment. I do not recommend exercising through pain especially if the origin is not fully known. I think you would be much better off is you saw a qualified orthopedic specialist before any further exercise.
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    Mar 09, 2014 8:29 PM GMT
    topathlete saidThe pain could be where you feel it or it could be referred pain meaning the origin is at a different location. The pain could result from a sore muscle or there could be some connective tissue impairment. I do not recommend exercising through pain especially if the origin is not fully known. I think you would be much better off is you saw a qualified orthopedic specialist before any further exercise.


    Or, more specifically, a PT specializing in sports medicine.

    RICE is the standard protocol for this initially.

    Rest
    Ice
    Compression
    Elevation

    If you've had bleeding, you've almost certainly had a grade 2 tear. That indicates review by a health care professional.

    Be careful if you are untrained and working with kettle bells. Momentum injuries can tear you up, and, given your age, you don't want to have to deal with surgical repair.

    RICE is the first treatment protocol.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    Mar 09, 2014 8:40 PM GMT
    Strongly agree with the suggestion to see a sports doctor or sports physical therapist at least. Knowing what you're dealing with can make the difference between something minor, which can be dealt with by a minor variation of your activity and something major, which becomes aggravated by further activity and requires more serious treatment to cure. Relating to the age range, we'll just add that full stretching is ALWAYS necessary, particularly when embarking on a new type of exercise. But now that you're experiencing the pain, definitely backing off the exercise and stretching of the affected muscles entirely pending a medical assessment would be the wisest course. Best of luck!
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    Mar 09, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    BillandChuck saidStrongly agree with the suggestion to see a sports doctor or sports physical therapist at least. Knowing what you're dealing with can make the difference between something minor, which can be dealt with by a minor variation of your activity and something major, which becomes aggravated by further activity and requires more serious treatment to cure. Relating to the age range, we'll just add that full stretching is ALWAYS necessary, particularly when embarking on a new type of exercise. But now that you're experiencing the pain, definitely backing off the exercise and stretching of the affected muscles entirely pending a medical assessment would be the wisest course. Best of luck!


    The R part of RICE.
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    Mar 10, 2014 4:18 AM GMT
    It would be impossible considering the given information for anyone online to give you accurate advice. Some questions to consider ...

    Is this "pain" muscle soreness or localized discomfort? Or is it more disabling "injury" pain? If kettlebells are not something you normally do, it wouldn't be uncommon for the exercises to work the muscles in ways they have not been accustomed, resulting in additional soreness.

    Is this upper arm pain interfering with generally daily activities? Does class make the symptoms better or worse?

    Have you talked with the class instructor regarding your form? If you haven't, you should. You should also ask for exercise modifications while you work through this issue.

    Is the issue getting better, worse, staying the same? Symptoms that are increasing in severity definitely need a medical assessment.

    Best of luck!
  • seafrontbloke

    Posts: 300

    Mar 10, 2014 8:45 PM GMT
    Thanks for your input, guys. I've discussed this with some professionals and part of the response is "posture"

    Basically decades of hunching to hide (I'm my mind at least) my excess weight, has given me a bad posture which I need to resolve. I'm going to discuss this with a pt at my gym who specialises in posture and will slow down on the kettle bells until I'm more sure of myself.

    Oh yes ;) and thanks for the "at your age" ...