knee pain in "child's pose"

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    Mar 20, 2014 3:45 PM GMT
    While sitting in the Yoga "child's pose" I experience pain behind my knees and into my hamstring. Is this generally a stretching issue or so I be concerned about other issues. I used to be able to do this move without any difficulty.
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    Mar 20, 2014 5:36 PM GMT
    I would go to my doctor and ask her and she'd refer me to a physical therapist. Which would probably be helpful.

    I have a slight discomfort on the right, sort of in the glutes. Told my doctor and off to the physical therapist she sent me. The doctor showed me a picture and where there's joining of several tendons there. The physical therapist is having me do some strengthening exercises; I was already doing stretches. It's gotten better but not entirely gone; I figure that at our age some aches and pains are to be expected.
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Mar 21, 2014 4:24 AM GMT
    Have you talked with your teacher about this? There are three muscles that comprise the hamstrings and they attach to the posterior tibia and (one, I think) to the fibula. You many have strained these attachments in other poses, particularly standing and seated forward bends. There would be inflammation at these attachment points that you may be compressing when you enter child's pose. You might lessen this compression if you place a block lengthwise under your butt and used another one for your forehead to even you out.

    Hamstring injuries can be slow going away so take it slow and easy.




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 26, 2014 1:31 AM GMT
    starboard5 saidHave you talked with your teacher about this? There are three muscles that comprise the hamstrings and they attach to the posterior tibia and (one, I think) to the fibula. You many have strained these attachments in other poses, particularly standing and seated forward bends. There would be inflammation at these attachment points that you may be compressing when you enter child's pose. You might lessen this compression if you place a block lengthwise under your butt and used another one for your forehead to even you out.

    Hamstring injuries can be slow going away so take it slow and easy.





    +1 sounds like standard yoga modifier :-) :-) try iiiit :-) sounds like starboard is certified xD
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    Apr 01, 2014 12:17 PM GMT
    I definately agree with starboard. Speak to your instructor PRONTO. Its best to find strategies to work this out together, reason being no-one knows your body like you and your teacher could tailor a solution that'll help you. Had the same prob with one of my students who was slightly overweight a while back, and after a bit of "trial-and-error" foam cushions worked wonders for her. So i definately recommend that.
  • Austinshere

    Posts: 1

    Aug 10, 2014 7:49 PM GMT
    From what I know, Virasana, "Warrior Pose" when done correctly, spreads the synovial fluid in the knee joint. Initially, you may sit up as high as necessary for comfort, gradually taking away blankets until your buttocks are able to touch the floor. Make sure that your toes are pointing straight back behind you. Knees together. Your hips between your ankles. Tops of feet flat on the floor.
    This pose looks like it would hurt the knees, but in fact, it is considered the best thing for them (because the synovial fluid lubricates).
    Unfortunately, for the hamstring issue, I do not know enough about that to be of any guidance.
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    Sep 09, 2014 12:08 AM GMT
    sitting in childs pose too long can give you nerve damage which can lead to drop foot - your foot flops around like its dead and you trip on it

    put a pillow under your bum and if it hurts then dont do it
  • yogarob23

    Posts: 4

    Jan 14, 2015 3:16 AM GMT
    I would recommend the use of some props.. a nice block to sit on.. or a blanket to leave under your Knees or ankles to help relieve some of the unnecessary pressure.
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    Jan 14, 2015 1:12 PM GMT
    There used to be a vaudeville joke used in the ever-popular doctor's sketches:

    "Doctor, it hurts here when I touch this."
    "Then don't touch it."

    The serious lesson is you shouldn't continue actions that cause undiagnosed pain in your joints. Do get it professionally diagnosed. But neither do you always need to stop your program. ("Don't touch it")

    You can "work through" some pain without incurring injury, once you've been cleared by trained personnel. In my case the knee pain, some of it behind the knee, was due to torn cartilage I didn't know I had. The first doctor gave me injections and told me to work through it. The knee got worse.

    A second doctor correctly diagnosed the problem and said working through the pain had damaged the joint further, and I required surgery to remove the torn cartilage. I immediately improved, but as predicted long-term damage had been done, and today I limp with a cane.

    The first step is always to find out what the problem really is. Direct physical examination is preferable to relying solely upon online advice.
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    Jan 16, 2015 4:55 AM GMT
    I will get blasted for saying this here but yoga will wreck your body. The poses are held far too long to be beneficial.