Time to Grow

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2008 2:38 AM GMT
    Wow, it's that time of year again. The mailbox is starting to vomit seed catalogs. Who has big plans for the 09 garden?

    Only a few weeks until it's time to bring the greenhouse back to life. Oh, it's amazing how much trouble can come from a few small packets of seeds.

    GH21208.jpg

    I'm not sure how much I'll do this year. I'll probably root some cuttings from the vineyard and the woods. I used to grow a lot of vegetable and flower starts - stuff you can't get at home depot - and sell them in May. Then we'd transplant what was left out into the field and have a u-pick vegetable garden in the summer. But my Dad sat out there all day, tending the garden and chatting with customers. Now that he's gone, I don't have time for that. So far, I've been unable to hire a regular farm hand. Maybe I'll try to make some deals with neighboring teenagers.
    Or maybe I'll just divide the greenhouse into sections and rent them out.


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    Dec 27, 2008 9:29 AM GMT
    Teenagers? icon_razz.gif They'll turn it into a marijuana plantation totally. icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 27, 2008 2:52 PM GMT
    I know a retired college professor who has a couple of greenhouses like yours, and grows vegetables nearly year-round near frigid Canada! Assuming the snow-covered one in the pic is yours, you may not have to limit yourself to the snow-free months.

    His specialty is hydroponics, which I'm sure you know about, and his fresh tomatoes command especially good prices in the winter. Here's an info link:

    http://www.manta.com/coms2/dnbcompany_jblbfc
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    Dec 27, 2008 5:49 PM GMT
    Yes, I could heat and light it all winter, but to maintain growing conditions, the cost is prohibitive. Twenty-dollar tomatoes, anyone? It was originally designed when energy costs were much lower, and used for research projects, where the commodity price of the end product didn't have to cover the operating expenses. Someday I'll switch it over to more efficient heating systems, but there's a fair amount of capital expense involved.

    I did grow tomatoes and peppers all winter once. When my Dad's cancer came back, it was a nice place for him to spend the days.

    There was a plague of frogs that year. Tomatoes attract and support whiteflies like crazy. While whiteflies cause all kinds of problems, I didn't want to use insecticides in the enclosed space because we spent so much time in there. The whiteflies caused a tree-frog population explosion. There were as many frogs on the vines as tomatoes. They would crawl around on our bodies when we were working in there. Sometimes, I'd be back in the office, an hour later, and notice that there was still a frog on my shoulder, or on my hat.

    I've often thought that the greenhouse might be an exotic place for a little mid-winter nookie. But I'm not sure that I could perform with frogs crawling around on my ass.