I wonder about Spartacus...

  • comoesta

    Posts: 21

    Mar 29, 2014 3:51 AM GMT
    So, as I watch Spartacus/GoT and other shows set in older eras, I can't help but wonder were there really that defined good looking guys in those times. I am aware and Arnold started all the body building in the late 7o/80s (not sure) so is it possible that there were hot muscled guys in ancient times? I mean were gladiators really that hunky and hot. Are there any historians on RJ that can shed some light on this, so my mind can be finally at peace lol. I think what I am actually interested to know is did human physique has improved with time or it became weak. Thanks guys!
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Mar 29, 2014 6:18 AM GMT
    Well…. I think there is ample evidence in ancient Greek & Roman sculpture to suggest that the male physique has been developed, adored and worshiped for a very long time. Below are just three examples:

    The Barberini Faun: The sculpture was either carved by an unknown Hellenistic sculptor of the Pergamene school, in the late third or early second century BCE or is a Roman copy of high quality, though its present form was given it by a series of restorers in Rome… The statue was found in the 1620s in the moat below the Castel Sant'Angelo … The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum, and Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile

    70963372.Dm7lAJO5.Interactionwithart020.

    The Dying Gaul: Also called The Dying Galatian[ (in Italian: Galata Morente) or The Dying Gladiator — is an ancient Roman marble copy of a lost Hellenistic sculpture thought to have been executed in bronze. It may have been commissioned some time between 230 and 220 BC … The identity of the sculptor of the original is unknown ...

    dying_gaul_cm1.JPG

    Laocoön and His Sons: also called the Laocoön Group, has been one of the most famous ancient sculptures ever since it was excavated in Rome in 1506 and placed on public display in the Vatican, where it remains. Exceptionally, it appears to be identifiable with a statue praised in the highest terms by the main Roman writer on art, Pliny the Elder. The figures are near life-size and the group is a little over 2 m (6 ft 7 in) in height, showing the Trojan priest Laocoön and his sons Antiphantes and Thymbraeus being attacked by sea serpents. … Various dates have been suggested for the statue, ranging from about 200 BC to the 70s AD, though "a Julio-Claudian date [between 27 BC and 68 AD] ... is now preferred".

    Lacoon-Group.jpg
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Mar 29, 2014 6:30 AM GMT
    People didn't eat the fattening foods we have now, and life in general was much harder. You had to haul your own water, kill your own food and work in the city did not have the modern day conveniences of lifts and tractors, so a lot of the work was done by shear muscle. I image that society was really probably a lot better looking, physically.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Mar 29, 2014 6:43 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidPeople didn't eat the fattening foods we have now, and life in general was much harder. You had to haul your own water, kill your own food and work in the city did not have the modern day conveniences of lifts and tractors, so a lot of the work was done by shear muscle. I image that society was really probably a lot better looking, physically.

    Yes, people didn't sit at their computers all day long. They fucking WORKED for a living. The sculptures above were quarried, hauled from quarry to city and carved by hand (no power tools). All food was organically grown.

    On the down side, most people living in the times the sculptures above were created did not live past age 35. Running water was scarce and sewage (both human and animal) was common in city streets. Overall their idea of cleanliness wouldn't have appealed to us. My dad, who was born in 1903, took a bath once a week whether he needed one or not.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Mar 29, 2014 7:27 AM GMT
    I love this stuff so I'm going to post more pix without commentary…

    nf_greeceqatarnude_apr29.jpg

    metope_kentauromachy.jpg

    epidaurus-sculpture-2-AD.jpg

    kritios%20boy%20490.gif

    NG_8Greek2.jpg

    1023.jpg

    450505236_32849f24dd_o.jpg

    rsz_uffizi_wrestlers_magnier_louvre_mr20
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2014 8:53 AM GMT
    Two big things:

    1. People were much shorter back then, maybe an average of 5'3" for men. So they automatically looked more muscular in artwork.

    2. Most of these statues are of gods so they are supposed to be better than the average guy in every way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2014 1:06 PM GMT
    I'm wacky for Liam McIntyre.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2014 1:09 PM GMT
    Seeing all of those statues with muscled guys and with the small peen makes me feel hung like a horse! icon_lol.gif


    Some of us are growers!
    icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2014 1:16 PM GMT
    I love this sculpture but a REAL sea serpent would know to go for the scrotum.
    Lacoon-Group.jpg