cutting up is more confusing than gay republicans

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 28, 2008 7:06 AM GMT
    ok so i've been trying to cut up for a while now and ive given up on trying to research nutrition cause everything keeps saying to split up your meals into different percentages of macronutrients, exact weight of food, etc etc etc and i don't no anybody who calculates the percentages of nutrients in every one of their meals. also i no i should be eating every few hours but i always seem to get stuck in a situation where getting a clean low carb meal isn't an option. i would just like some tips from some cutting novices who no how to get everything they need in their diets while still losing weight. also, what can i do for those late night cravings when i've eaten super clean the whole day and totally crash at night? any help is appreciated
  • leatherman05

    Posts: 44

    Dec 28, 2008 1:35 PM GMT
    i have concluded that diets are for suckers.
    no "special" diet can be persisted in for a lifetime. what u are looking for is a sustainable eating pattern that, given the level of exercise u are willing to undertake fairly consistently over your lifetime (and not just in the week before going to a beach) will leave u with a healthy and nice enough body. and that largely is a matter of eating normal food - fish, meat in moderation, and veg and fruit to your taste - but doing so in the quantities that produce the body weight u are willing to settle for.
    remember - u are looking for the pattern that can last a lifetime. so it takes time to adjust quantities downwards to a sensible but comfortable level, and for this to be reflected in your body appearance.
    diets are for mugs.
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Dec 28, 2008 4:48 PM GMT
    try looking at the ABS diet. while it is a diet, It contains lots of heatlhy foods, and how to eat in the right portions. you can use it to get on the right track, and then use what you've learned to continue from there.

    it can help you to KNOW (not "no") how to eat right
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 28, 2008 4:56 PM GMT
    Judging from your pics, "cutting it up" ain't gonna give you anything more than a visible skeleton. You should be around 200 lbs at 10% for your height.

    Before you start trimming, you're going to want to develop a fair amount of muscle tone. Ironically, the diet for bulking up is really no different from cutting back: the difference is the amount of calories. Another interesting quirk about getting lean is you can actually gain muscle at the same time.

    When I'm doing off-season training (roughly September to January), I'm eating a minimum of six meals a day, each with 40-50g of protein and 80g of carbs for a minimum of 240g of protein and 480g of carbs or 2880 calories not including fat. Fat is negligible, and you only need to be concerned if you're eating a bucket of fried chicken on a daily basis, otherwise don't feel guilty about putting butter on your toast, and always be sure to get in some peanut butter for your essential fats so you don't fry your brain.

    The off-season diet doesn't make you get lean, in fact, you'll be lucky to see abs, but you won't get higher than about 11% body fat as eating often trains your body to burn calories rather than store them.

    My on-season diet, I actually bring up my calories considerably. From February through August, I eat a minimum of ten meals a day at 40-50g of protein and 60g of carbs for a minimum of 400g of protein and 600g of carbs or 4000 calories not including fat. This is when you should be more concerned about fat content: keep your meats lean and skip the butter, but be sure to get at least three spoon-fulls of peanut butter to get your essential fats in.

    The on-season diet forces your body to use the surplus of calories. Your metabolism cranks into full throttle and you'll literally be bouncing off the walls. For the duration of the season, I do high intensity interval training at least once a day, twice a day if I need to get absolutely shredded. This forces your metabolism even higher. What happens is your body's protein-recycling process has been completely overridden and you build muscle like crazy, your body is running off the high carbs, preserving your muscle, and you're eating so often your body is not at all encouraged to store fat because it knows you're getting more food on short order.

    Doing this you can get down to at least 7% body fat naturally while being able to carry 200 lbs on your frame, but it's literally a full-time job to pull off, especially if you want to maintain the look year-round.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Dec 28, 2008 5:45 PM GMT
    What do you eat in one of those meals to consume 60 to 80 grams of carbs?

    Wha
    flex89 saidJudging from your pics, "cutting it up" ain't gonna give you anything more than a visible skeleton. You should be around 200 lbs at 10% for your height.

    Before you start trimming, you're going to want to develop a fair amount of muscle tone. Ironically, the diet for bulking up is really no different from cutting back: the difference is the amount of calories. Another interesting quirk about getting lean is you can actually gain muscle at the same time.

    When I'm doing off-season training (roughly September to January), I'm eating a minimum of six meals a day, each with 40-50g of protein and 80g of carbs for a minimum of 240g of protein and 480g of carbs or 2880 calories not including fat. Fat is negligible, and you only need to be concerned if you're eating a bucket of fried chicken on a daily basis, otherwise don't feel guilty about putting butter on your toast, and always be sure to get in some peanut butter for your essential fats so you don't fry your brain.

    The off-season diet doesn't make you get lean, in fact, you'll be lucky to see abs, but you won't get higher than about 11% body fat as eating often trains your body to burn calories rather than store them.

    My on-season diet, I actually bring up my calories considerably. From February through August, I eat a minimum of ten meals a day at 40-50g of protein and 60g of carbs for a minimum of 400g of protein and 600g of carbs or 4000 calories not including fat. This is when you should be more concerned about fat content: keep your meats lean and skip the butter, but be sure to get at least three spoon-fulls of peanut butter to get your essential fats in.

    The on-season diet forces your body to use the surplus of calories. Your metabolism cranks into full throttle and you'll literally be bouncing off the walls. For the duration of the season, I do high intensity interval training at least once a day, twice a day if I need to get absolutely shredded. This forces your metabolism even higher. What happens is your body's protein-recycling process has been completely overridden and you build muscle like crazy, your body is running off the high carbs, preserving your muscle, and you're eating so often your body is not at all encouraged to store fat because it knows you're getting more food on short order.

    Doing this you can get down to at least 7% body fat naturally while being able to carry 200 lbs on your frame, but it's literally a full-time job to pull off, especially if you want to maintain the look year-round.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 28, 2008 6:10 PM GMT
    If you are "crashing" at night, you may be going "too low carb" during the day. Even during cutting, I would advise ample complex carbs especially earlier in the day -- oatmeal, whole fruit, whole grain prod's, etc. Broccoli is great fiber, but it won't do much for your endurance in the gym.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 28, 2008 9:33 PM GMT
    flex89 saidJudging from your pics, "cutting it up" ain't gonna give you anything more than a visible skeleton. You should be around 200 lbs at 10% for your height.

    Before you start trimming, you're going to want to develop a fair amount of muscle tone. Ironically, the diet for bulking up is really no different from cutting back: the difference is the amount of calories. Another interesting quirk about getting lean is you can actually gain muscle at the same time.

    When I'm doing off-season training (roughly September to January), I'm eating a minimum of six meals a day, each with 40-50g of protein and 80g of carbs for a minimum of 240g of protein and 480g of carbs or 2880 calories not including fat. Fat is negligible, and you only need to be concerned if you're eating a bucket of fried chicken on a daily basis, otherwise don't feel guilty about putting butter on your toast, and always be sure to get in some peanut butter for your essential fats so you don't fry your brain.

    The off-season diet doesn't make you get lean, in fact, you'll be lucky to see abs, but you won't get higher than about 11% body fat as eating often trains your body to burn calories rather than store them.

    My on-season diet, I actually bring up my calories considerably. From February through August, I eat a minimum of ten meals a day at 40-50g of protein and 60g of carbs for a minimum of 400g of protein and 600g of carbs or 4000 calories not including fat. This is when you should be more concerned about fat content: keep your meats lean and skip the butter, but be sure to get at least three spoon-fulls of peanut butter to get your essential fats in.

    The on-season diet forces your body to use the surplus of calories. Your metabolism cranks into full throttle and you'll literally be bouncing off the walls. For the duration of the season, I do high intensity interval training at least once a day, twice a day if I need to get absolutely shredded. This forces your metabolism even higher. What happens is your body's protein-recycling process has been completely overridden and you build muscle like crazy, your body is running off the high carbs, preserving your muscle, and you're eating so often your body is not at all encouraged to store fat because it knows you're getting more food on short order.

    Doing this you can get down to at least 7% body fat naturally while being able to carry 200 lbs on your frame, but it's literally a full-time job to pull off, especially if you want to maintain the look year-round.

    thanks for the help and my pics r old btw i'm actually about 190 lbs right now and i don't wanna try gaining any more mass before i get rid of some of the fat