Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich Resigns After Protests from Gay Marriage Supporters

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2014 12:33 AM GMT
    Mozilla co-founder CEO Brendan Eich, who came under fire this week for donating to a campaign to ban gay marriage in California, has resigned.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/mozilla-ceo-resigns-calif-gay-marriage-ban-campaign/story?id=23181711
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2014 1:08 AM GMT

    icon_eek.gif
  • Phobophobia

    Posts: 20

    Apr 04, 2014 2:20 AM GMT
    If you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2014 2:28 AM GMT
    Phobophobia saidIf you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen.

    And maybe not every sous-chef is cut out to become the chef de cuisine.
  • carew28

    Posts: 658

    Apr 04, 2014 8:40 PM GMT
    His chickens have come home to roost.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2014 11:11 PM GMT
    carew28 saidHis chickens have come home to roost.

    Of course the Right is now complaining that this is an example of suppression of freedom of speech. Nope, the guy got to make his statement with his support for Prop 8. There was no censorship or prior restraint involved, nor did the government get involved at all. He wasn't charged with breaking any law. The US Constitution has not been violated.

    If he must suffer the business consequences of his actions with the public then too bad. Isn't that what the Right calls the free market? Isn't that why they're always calling for boycotts of companies that are friendly to GLBT? Isn't that why they ran Ellen DeGeneres off the air when she first came out as a lesbian?

    The mark of a bully is being able to dish it out to others but not take it themselves. The bully chorus is particularly shrill on this one.
  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1980

    Apr 05, 2014 9:35 PM GMT
    His bigotry was a bad reflection on his company, and as a result the company's own developers wanted him gone.
    This is how the free market works, which is what conservatives claim to support.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19122

    Apr 05, 2014 10:04 PM GMT
    I'm really mixed about this. It's starting to look really petty when a guy who donated a small amount of money 8 years ago has to pay for it with his job in 2014. 8 years ago, even Obama had a different stance on gay marriage. I'm not condoning this CEO's stance on gay marriage, but I'm not entirely sure I agree with the tactics that the activists are resorting to either. I feel like it could have a backlash of sorts if they are not careful.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2014 1:37 AM GMT
    YourName2000 saidPersonally, I don't think he was fired over the $1000 donation...he was fired because he created a firestorm for the company and was thoroughly impotent and containing (much less defusing) it. He was given many opportunities to "come clean" and he simply avoided the question. I think that was the wrong tactic and just made him look feckless and spineless.

    Bottom line, if he couldn't "lead" his way out of this minor (self-created) controversy, he clearly was the wrong person to lead Mozilla to greater heights. They're going to run into bigger problems than this, and they need someone who makes those problems better, not worse.

    +1

    A very sophisticated analysis, that may well be the answer to why Eich had to resign.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2014 3:08 AM GMT
    This may surprise you all, but I'm not entirely comfortable with the way this was handled. He said that in no way would his personal beliefs influence decisions regarding the way the company treated its employees---whether we're talking promotions, benefits, or "company culture". If that was really true---and I do say "if"---why was it necessary for him to go?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 06, 2014 3:48 AM GMT
    Sharkadelic saidThis may surprise you all, but I'm not entirely comfortable with the way this was handled. He said that in no way would his personal beliefs influence decisions regarding the way the company treated its employees---whether we're talking promotions, benefits, or "company culture". If that was really true---and I do say "if"---why was it necessary for him to go?


    Eich realized he'd be spending the next several years wasting his time trying to prove a negative, as the company he helms tries to weather, and brace for, PR hits... validating that whole "if" part was too high-risk, low-reward for him to see through.

    Also, he recognizes he'll still be able to make bank as an expert technical consultant somewhere else, without the heat lamp that would accompany the CEO title.
  • carew28

    Posts: 658

    Apr 06, 2014 7:27 PM GMT
    I think rank-and-file employees should have the right to express their own beliefs, as long as it's done in a courteous, considerate way, in an appropriate setting, and that this shouldn't jeopardize their job in any way.

    But Eich wasn't a rank-and-file employee. He'd donated a large sum of money to a political cause meant to take away gay people's right to marry. And then, he was appointed to a high-level, policy-making position, in which he'd be responsible for making and enforcing policies that would affect people's lives. I think the firestorm of opposition to his appointment was justified, and resigning was the right thing for him to have done. His statement that, as CEO, he'd be impartial and fair in enforcing policy doesn't sufficiently reassure me that he'd be fair in forming those policies to begin with.

    People in high-level, policy-making positions, need to be held to a higher standard, and people need to accept the consequences of their actions. What goes around, comes around.