Languages

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 12:41 PM GMT
    English is obviously my native tongue. I've been taking Spanish classes since I was ten years old. I'm getting great practice now being in Spain and I think I'm starting to taste fluency, even though I still have a ways to go. I plan on being fluent within the next five years, so maybe I'll find a way to go to Latin America and speak more.

    Now, I'm thinking of using one of my electives next semester to start a new language. Either French, Italian, or Portuguese. I'm not really interested in starting from total scratch with another non-Romance language, i.e. Mandarin or German.

    Is trying to learn a third language when I haven't mastered Spanish yet a bad idea? What are your experiences with languages and learning new ones? I think learning Portuguese would be easiest, as it's most similar to Spanish, but I'm not in love with the sound of it. It almost sounds like a softer Russian to me. Then I think Italian would be next, followed by French being the most difficult of the three. That said, I think Italian is the sexiest language, and French can also be very charming.
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    Apr 05, 2014 12:47 PM GMT
    Indeed Italian is the easiest. French can be tricky.
    I think learning different languages at the same time is not a problem. It's like a gymnastics of the brain so the more you learn, the more your brain will be used to learning and the more you will be efficient. It's a bit like playing different sports at the same time.
    I am currently learning 3 languages at the same time, and I feel like my brain is more and more efficient at learning.
  • Fable

    Posts: 3866

    Apr 05, 2014 12:50 PM GMT
    ^ this.
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    Apr 05, 2014 12:54 PM GMT
    It's also based on how you enjoy learning. My family is Italian and I wanted to take Italian in high school. They gave me Spanish instead. The funny thing is my cousin took Italian and a lot of the words were similar.
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    Apr 05, 2014 12:56 PM GMT
    Also, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 1:26 PM GMT
    Italian for sure, it's a beautiful language and very similar to spanish so it wont be hard for you to learn it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 1:29 PM GMT
    If you like opera, take the Italian.
    Many consider it the most beautiful language.
    If you don't, take French. People think you're high class if you know how to speak French.
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    Apr 05, 2014 1:31 PM GMT
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?

    I learned english all by myself, never took any lessons so to me at least its been easy. Less words than spanish, easier verbs and rules. Thats my opinion, I still havent mastered it mostly because i never get to practice it outside the internet except when i meet tourists.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 1:38 PM GMT
    Learning new languages is overrated. Almost the whole world knows English. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Apr 05, 2014 2:14 PM GMT
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?
    Does English sound as muddled up as other languages do to us native English speakers ????

    I want to learn German icon_smile.gif i have a learning pack at home and also Spanish and many others such as Japanese and Polish but i lack concentration icon_sad.gif
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Apr 05, 2014 2:34 PM GMT
    David3000 said
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?

    I learned english all by myself, never took any lessons so to me at least its been easy. Less words than spanish, easier verbs and rules. Thats my opinion, I still havent mastered it mostly because i never get to practice it outside the internet except when i meet tourists.


    English has more words than Spanish. We just don't use them all, except in scrabble ( actually, that's a lie, there are words in the OED that aren't in the official scrabble dictionary).
  • Karl

    Posts: 5787

    Apr 05, 2014 2:51 PM GMT
    why not ?

    Since you knew Spanish already, Italian is very easy for you.
    I speak fluently Vietnamese, English and quite good in Spanish , currently I'm trying Italian also, much easier than French.
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    Apr 05, 2014 3:42 PM GMT
    woodsmen said
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?
    Here is what it is like: (1) Why does the word "equipment" do not end with "s" to denote plurality? (2) Why is it "pants" and by that I mean would you ever wear one pant? (3) How about "scissors" and by that would you ever use one scissor? Why do people drive on the parkway but park on the driveway? Why does the word "junk" do not end with "s" to denote plurality? And on and on.
    Follow this link to a great person to understand English icon_smile.gif

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=susie+dent&oq=susie&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.2902j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=2&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 3:43 PM GMT
    I downloaded Rosetta Stone from PirateBay icon_lol.gif
  • SENCGuy1

    Posts: 247

    Apr 05, 2014 3:45 PM GMT
    I had four years of French in high school and was able to place out in college. Thirty years later I took a semester of Spanish, couldn't remember a word of it but when asked a question in Spanish, I could reply in French. So learning the other language didn't work but it really brought back the first I'd learned.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2014 4:56 PM GMT
    Xavier92 saidI downloaded Rosetta Stone from PirateBay icon_lol.gif

    But learning new languages is overrated. Almost the whole world knows English.
    (har)
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Apr 05, 2014 4:57 PM GMT
    woodsmen said
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?
    Here is what it is like: (1) Why does the word "equipment" do not end with "s" to denote plurality? (2) Why is it "pants" and by that I mean would you ever wear one pant? (3) How about "scissors" and by that would you ever use one scissor? Why do people drive on the parkway but park on the driveway? Why does the word "junk" do not end with "s" to denote plurality? And on and on.
    LOL! No wonder you're so stuck on using the dictionary as an authority. (Hint: we English speakers don't regard it that way; it defines words but is not a font of knowledge. For that, you need an encyclopedia.)

    SOOO much to understand and English changes rather rapidly…

    You might better understand English if you knew its etymology. For example, since 1893 the word "pant" (singular for an article of clothing worn on both legs) has been acceptable in the OED. However "pants" (singular again) is still most commonly used. Why? Well, because "pants" is a shortened version of "pantaloons" which entered English in the 1600s as a derogatory term. Fashionable Englishmen wore knee-breeches.

    The word pantaloons is an eponym. Pantelone (also spelled Pantaloun) was a stock character in the Commedia dell’Arte plays popular in Italy from the late 16th century. By the 17th century his name was proverbial for an old-fashioned, wealthy, grasping authority figure. His traditional costume included long trousers. When trend-setters from France started wearing their breeches to the ankle, Englishmen ridiculed the new fashion by associating it with the ridiculous character Pantelone.
    By 1830, the tide had turned; only old fogies clung to knee-breeches. Pantaloons was no longer a term of ridicule, but the accepted name of the now accepted men’s garment.
    By1840 those pesky American clothing salesmen had shortened pantaloons to pants.
    So, in answer to your question, the English language contains within it a history of European and American culture. Dictionaries don't explain that.
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    Apr 05, 2014 5:02 PM GMT
    JohnSpotter said
    Xavier92 saidI downloaded Rosetta Stone from PirateBay icon_lol.gif

    But learning new languages is overrated. Almost the whole world knows English.
    (har)


    Sex is overrated and everyone loves it icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Apr 05, 2014 5:14 PM GMT
    David3000 said
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?

    I learned english all by myself, never took any lessons so to me at least its been easy. Less words than spanish, easier verbs and rules. Thats my opinion, I still havent mastered it mostly because i never get to practice it outside the internet except when i meet tourists.


    English is easy to learn (i.e easy conjugations, tenses) but extremely difficult to master. Most natives have not even come close to absorbing it's complexities. English has a large vocabulary as it has been influenced by Germanic and romantic languages, and retained so many word from both. I cannot make a comparison to Spanish, but compared to French, you can express yourself in so many more fashions and with much freedom in English.
    My English friend is studying translation with other french people, and her professor told the class, and I paraphrase: Learning English is easy, but you can forget mastering, the language is too vast and detailed.
    Give this a read: The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956
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    Apr 05, 2014 7:14 PM GMT
    In response to the original post, French is more widely spoken than Italian or Portuguese so that would be one factor to consider, especially if you want to spend time in Montreal (and why wouldn't you!) when you get back to North America. Meanwhile, I hope you're having a great time in Europe. You have been posting some really great photos during your current time abroad.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Apr 05, 2014 7:54 PM GMT
    Xavier92 saidI downloaded Rosetta Stone from PirateBay icon_lol.gif


    that's nice, enjoy learning Gafat
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    Apr 05, 2014 10:17 PM GMT
    Dennis1989 said
    MCB_ saidAlso, for the non-native English speakers, what is learning English like?
    Does English sound as muddled up as other languages do to us native English speakers ????

    I want to learn German icon_smile.gif i have a learning pack at home and also Spanish and many others such as Japanese and Polish but i lack concentration icon_sad.gif

    You want to learn German but you lack concentration? Good luck with that.

    I want to put in a pitch for learning other languages. Learning a new language opens up your understanding of how basic thought processes are affected and shaped by the tools you use to express yourself, i.e., your language. If you want to begin to understand a different culture, learn their language well enough to get through basic conversations and read a newspaper.

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    Apr 06, 2014 7:07 AM GMT
    LionEyes saidFrom Spanish move to Catalan, Italian or Portuguese they are the best options as they're similar among each other. French it's also a Latin language but it's development it's more innovative than the others, having a strong Celtic and German (Frankish) languages base. Rumanian it's also a Latin language but it's heavily influenced by Slavic languages and it's the least similar from it's western sisters.

    My advice is that if you're looking to have a future career where to use languages (work for the UN for example) French will be the most useful (as is one of the official languages of the UN) after German. If you're studying just for fun, I would go for Italian or Portuguese, I studied Italian and I love it.


    Neither Italian nor Portuguese are languages that will truly benefit you. If you want to learn a language that has many roots - from the inception of civilization to modern day, then learn Greek. Greek is the basis and the foundation of so many now English words. Not to mention, every medical term, mathematical term etc. all are derived from Greek. You'll be a better homo too - considering we invented that as well.

    bc94b02da7f4bb56864463738ee0938a.jpg
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    Apr 06, 2014 2:16 PM GMT
    hellass said
    LionEyes saidFrom Spanish move to Catalan, Italian or Portuguese they are the best options as they're similar among each other. French it's also a Latin language but it's development it's more innovative than the others, having a strong Celtic and German (Frankish) languages base. Rumanian it's also a Latin language but it's heavily influenced by Slavic languages and it's the least similar from it's western sisters.

    My advice is that if you're looking to have a future career where to use languages (work for the UN for example) French will be the most useful (as is one of the official languages of the UN) after German. If you're studying just for fun, I would go for Italian or Portuguese, I studied Italian and I love it.


    Neither Italian nor Portuguese are languages that will truly benefit you. If you want to learn a language that has many roots - from the inception of civilization to modern day, then learn Greek. Greek is the basis and the foundation of so many now English words. Not to mention, every medical term, mathematical term etc. all are derived from Greek. You'll be a better homo too - considering we invented that as well.

    bc94b02da7f4bb56864463738ee0938a.jpg
    haha i like that icon_razz.gif
  • TheSkyWasYell...

    Posts: 310

    Apr 06, 2014 8:09 PM GMT
    I speak butchered Spanish (I live in Cal.) and butchered French (been to Tahiti). Overall, Spanish is easier but French is more fun to speak, it rolls off my tongue easier.