Does your voice get shaky when you speak in front of groups?

  • Nearon

    Posts: 56

    Apr 10, 2014 4:29 AM GMT
    Today I had to give my presentation in class, I was so nervous. My voice was shaking, my mouth was dry, and my voice cracked....someone even snickered I think.icon_sad.gif

    I have SEVERE anxiety when it comes to public speaking, I begged my instructor to let me out of it but he said no.

    I can't possibly show my face in class again. I looked so weak and pathetic
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    Apr 10, 2014 4:32 AM GMT
    Nope I like public speaking

    Yea that happens to everyone at least once.

    I was like that when I played violin in front of people, my hand shook

    I played violin and a crowd watched me the other day no problem

    Try again, its really a practiced art.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Apr 10, 2014 4:34 AM GMT
    Nearon saidToday I had to give my presentation in class, I was so nervous. My voice was shaking, my mouth was dry, and my voice cracked....someone even snickered I think.icon_sad.gif

    I have SEVERE anxiety when it comes to public speaking, I begged my instructor to let me out of it but he said no.

    I can't possibly show my face in class again. I looked so weak and pathetic

    I know a few ass holes may hang onto it for a time but so what. Just remember how much *you* remember or even think about what someone else said or did yesterday. Almost 99.9% of what we experience is *GONE* in a matter of hours. Why think you're so special that anyone else will even remember, or care of even think about it?
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    Apr 10, 2014 4:36 AM GMT
    Aww, poor thing!

    No, I did ALOT of public speaking back in High School, I'm comfortable talking in front of large groups.
    I also do Acrobatics (considered a "Performance Sport") so I'm used to performing in front of an audience.

    I wish I had some advice to give you...
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Apr 10, 2014 4:59 AM GMT
    Next time rehearse what you are going to say. Say it out loud as if you are speaking to an audience 10 times. I repeat, do it 10 times. When you write your speach, write it as a natural speaking voice as if you were just talking to some one. Do not use unnatural words that you do not use in every day conversation or it just sounds like you are reading it. Once you have rehearsed it ten times in row, your brain has memorized it, so when you get up to speak in front of an audience, your brain will take over and it will just flow out naturally. Note! Do not go off script or your brain will get confused and you will get lost and forget everything that you were going to say. --- voice of experience
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    Apr 10, 2014 5:02 AM GMT
    No.
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    Apr 10, 2014 5:06 AM GMT
    Nearon saidToday I had to give my presentation in class, I was so nervous. My voice was shaking, my mouth was dry, and my voice cracked....someone even snickered I think.icon_sad.gif

    I have SEVERE anxiety when it comes to public speaking, I begged my instructor to let me out of it but he said no.

    I can't possibly show my face in class again. I looked so weak and pathetic


    I've had an experience like this in the past too. Sucks badly. I get weak in the legs too! I must say I continue to avoid public speaking as much as possible.

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    Apr 10, 2014 6:54 AM GMT
    LionEyes saidWhen I was younger and was very anti-social and insecure and if I had to speak in public, like in front of the class, I would speak fast to get it over with. Today I'm a very confident man and I could give a speech in public with eyes closed if necessary, no problems at all.


    ^^ Eyes closed might be easier.
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    Apr 10, 2014 9:50 AM GMT
    You'll get over it. You just need someone to make you keep trying until you do.

    I once had a student who had no problem standing up in front of people and playing the trombone (he was really good at it and actually got paid coin for doing so.) In fact, blowing on his mouthpiece was how he got rid of nervous tension. But somehow, that didn't carry over into public speaking. When I made him give a presentation on his project to some government officials, he was pretty nervous, but he got through it. About five minute later, though, the sound of trombone music could be heard wafting over the conference center... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Apr 10, 2014 10:25 AM GMT
    I'm a professor and a big ham. I love talking in front of groups. If you can get a group to laugh outloud together or all get that look of "wow, this is fascinating" on their faces, then you'll be hooked. You can do it. Just talk things that are interesting and address the whole group by scanning the audience regularly and making eye contact. Smile. Relax. Enjoy it.
  • jlly_rnchr

    Posts: 1759

    Apr 10, 2014 10:41 AM GMT
    Nah, I don't shake or stutter, but am definitely nervous. I usually talk too fast and end up having to repeat most of it.
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    Apr 10, 2014 12:03 PM GMT
    I have to do it all the time as part of my work and in the beginning it was sheer terror. It gets better with practice. Do it often enough and eventually you will enjoy it.
    As others have said, make eye contact with your audience. You will see them responding positively to the discussion. Feed on that energy and there you are.
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    Apr 10, 2014 12:09 PM GMT
    No...
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    Apr 10, 2014 2:00 PM GMT
    No but I might space out.
    I hear most people fear public speaking more than death.
    My public speaking class was great fun though.
    I remember doing an exercise where we had to pick a topic out of a bag and speak on it off the top of our heads.
  • RJJB

    Posts: 34

    Apr 10, 2014 2:18 PM GMT
    I think most people are terrified of speaking in public. But if you can find a coach to help you manage your fear, you will have more opportunities for success in life. Public speaking can be learned, fear can be managed, and it is a little bit like learning how to type or learning a language, you will be surprised at the doors that are open to you if you master your fear.

    Have you ever heard of Johnny Carson, the host of the Tonight Show who went on TV most nights for decades? He was wonderful and brilliant in front of crowds, but never got over being absolutely terrified before he went out to face an audience. He mastered his fear, and audiences loved him. Look him up, I think he might end up being your patron saint!
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    Apr 10, 2014 2:48 PM GMT
    Practice. Practice. Practice. Take a public speaking class. And, whatever you do, always practice your speech or presentation at home, at least three times to make sure you have the material and your presentation down. It really helps to ease any anxiety. Nearly everyone gets nervous to a certain degree, but don't sweat it. It was a great thing that your instructor made you do this. I have seen classmates nearly vomit from nervousness, but in the long run, they become stronger from the experience.
  • safety43_mma1...

    Posts: 4251

    Apr 10, 2014 2:51 PM GMT
    To this day I still freak out no matter how much practice lol
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    Apr 10, 2014 2:52 PM GMT
    Nope. I've always been comfortable talking to large groups. I've never had stage fright, even when performing on the piano (and I did that a lot when I was younger) or singing.
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    Apr 10, 2014 2:54 PM GMT
    I take to public speaking like a duck to water. But then I have a degree in Speech. It wasn't always that way.

    I once was very socially shy, could barely pronounce my own name during an introduction. Instead of "Robert" with a "T" I'd half swallow it into "Rober". And some people would further embarrass me by saying: "Do you say you're a robber? What do you steal?" icon_redface.gif

    So I forced myself to overcome that deficiency. Or I should say, the Army initially did, by throwing me into positions where I was ORDERED to speak before others. And then I made Speech one of my college degrees, to further eliminate this hindrance.

    I guess it worked! You can throw me in front of as big an audience as you like, and without prep I can speak extemporaneously as easily as breathing, if it's a subject I know. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 10, 2014 2:55 PM GMT
    Sharkadelic saidNope. I've always been comfortable talking to large groups. I've never had stage fright, even when performing on the piano (and I did that a lot when I was younger) or singing.

    Any videos?
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Apr 10, 2014 2:58 PM GMT
    nope
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    Apr 10, 2014 3:43 PM GMT
    Yes and no.
    Not normally, having been forced in the military to get over it.
    However, the last time, in front of nearly a hundred, my right leg began to shake out of nowhere and found my voice weaken.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Apr 10, 2014 3:48 PM GMT
    I felt pretty bad imagining what the OP went through with his class.

    I would have encouraged him to practice, in front of family and or friends. Get a group of 4 or 5 people together.. enough to make it a challenge, but small enough so that if you totally screw up, it isn't the end of the world. Take steps to make it successful.

    I've had a mix of experiences. I remember about dying in high school drama with my presentation, but with a variety of experiences in college, including running for STUCO and serving in a number of leadership positions, you gain confidence. There was stress in law school when I had to facilitate a good oral argument in front of peers. Know your points, note a few things on paper to remind you and .. practice!

    With my weekly webradio recorded fitness program, it also was a little challenging, but now that the first season (and 23 shows) are done, sounded much better.

    Practice does make perfect~!

    icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Apr 10, 2014 4:48 PM GMT
    Back when I was more active in the community (with more energy...), I addressed the City Commission, School Board and was Master of Ceremonies for a dinner honoring various elected officials.

    NO_FEAR.gif
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    Apr 10, 2014 4:52 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidI felt pretty bad imagining what the OP went through with his class.

    I would have encouraged him to practice, in front of family and or friends. Get a group of 4 or 5 people together.. enough to make it a challenge, but small enough so that if you totally screw up, it isn't the end of the world. Take steps to make it successful.

    I've had a mix of experiences. I remember about dying in high school drama with my presentation, but with a variety of experiences in college, including running for STUCO and serving in a number of leadership positions, you gain confidence. There was stress in law school when I had to facilitate a good oral argument in front of peers. Know your points, note a few things on paper to remind you and .. practice!

    With my weekly webradio recorded fitness program, it also was a little challenging, but now that the first season (and 23 shows) are done, sounded much better.

    Practice does make perfect~!

    icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif


    Oral advocacy skills are hugely improved by moot court.