So I want to be a bodybuilder

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 13, 2014 3:02 AM GMT
    Hi. My name is Anthony and I live in Palm Springs. I decided that I want to do competitive bodybuilding. Now I am a complete amateur when it comes to the spot but a coworker of mine has inspired me. I gain muscle fast but also fat if I don't watch what I eat. I am though at a loss at where to start. I've been researching gyms in the area. Is the best way to start to get a trainer? Any advice or guidance would be much appreciated.
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Apr 13, 2014 12:18 PM GMT
    A trainer can help if you really don't know what you are doing. But there are lots of good programs online you can follow - including on this site.
    In my opinion, the three most important things are:
    - eat plenty of non-processed, whole food
    - get enough sleep
    - make every workout count (don't just go through the motions) and change things up frequently.

    Good luck!
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    Apr 13, 2014 2:38 PM GMT
    Well I hope your decision works out to the way you envision yourself which would be as a successful bodybuilder. I have thought about doing it but the costs of getting additional supplements and additional food along with the extra time needed to work out even harder also don't forget the steroid users in the sport who offer a competitive disadvantage to those who don't want to use it made me decide not to go into it.

    That sport based on my knowledge requires a lot of discipline and determination for the long haul and you have to be really determined to stay in the game even if you become disappointed if you do not win anything at first.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Apr 14, 2014 3:20 PM GMT
    DanceNFight,

    How old are the pictures in your profile? Because I don't see an amateur bodybuilder, and you need to be that before you cross over into competitive bodybuilding. I'm not trying to be mean, just want you to realize the road ahead.

    Being a amateur bodybuilder alone takes effort, money, dedication, eating right, and time (both long-term time and daily time). Crossing over into competitive bodybuilding: multiply all this by 10, and there's no guarantee you'll win competitions.

    I look at your pictures now, and it looks like you're starting from waaaay at the beginning. I see no trap development. Your lower pecs are hard to gauge underneath the bodyfat, but I can definitely tell there's no upper/inner pec development. You have a little bit of a bicep going on, but (and admittedly, it's a little hard to tell from a bicep-flex pose) your triceps are not developed, and neither are your quadriceps. You're a clean slate, literally.

    At this early point in your path, I would start learning the basics. All the basics of lifting and fitness. You can hire a trainer, and it doesn't have to be a bodybuilder (but it has to be a good trainer, because there's a lot of bad ones out there). Or start training with your buddy from work. Or DIY, and start doing programs you got from Men's Fitness magazine or the fitness section of askmen.com (not bodybuilding publications, but great places to start, to learn basic lifts).

    Start basic, learn the basics. As you progress more, and as you learn more, you'll be able to understand more advanced lifting advice.

    Cheers
  • panther

    Posts: 3

    Apr 14, 2014 9:11 PM GMT
    You might notice big improvements (ex. can lift much heavier in a short period of time) in the beginning. But, don't let it blind you. Be very careful not to get injured, or you will need to spend a lot of time for recovery. Good luck.
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Apr 15, 2014 11:00 AM GMT
    Don't be discouraged if that is your current pic. You have to start somewhere and you can make a lot of progress leaning out and becoming more muscular if you have the tools and techniques. If you are serious about bodybuilding, I can recommend an outstanding trainer in PS who specifically works with body builders. He is awesome himself and knows his stuff. Send me a private message if interested.
  • rugbyjockca

    Posts: 84

    Apr 22, 2014 11:05 AM GMT
    Gonna agree with those who say don't be discouraged. With the right mindset and a great diet/lifestyle change, you can make amazing changes in a short time. My boss at the gym I work at went from about 300lbs overweight to competing and placing in a competition in just over a year. To do that takes amazing dedication and determination, but it can be done!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 22, 2014 2:07 PM GMT
    DanceNFightR saidHi. My name is Anthony and I live in Palm Springs. I decided that I want to do competitive bodybuilding. Now I am a complete amateur when it comes to the spot but a coworker of mine has inspired me. I gain muscle fast but also fat if I don't watch what I eat. I am though at a loss at where to start. I've been researching gyms in the area. Is the best way to start to get a trainer? Any advice or guidance would be much appreciated.


    A good trainer can be invaluble especially when getting started, but lots of trainers don't known their ass from their elbow, and even fewer actually understand bodybuilding despite thinking they do.

    Bodybuilding takes time and progress measured in years rather than months or weeks, and IMO worth learning your craft yourself. It requires consistancy and discipline and when you aren't training or eating, reading up on your craft will help you enormously.