When ‘Liking’ a Brand Online Voids the Right to Sue

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:36 AM GMT
    NYT: Might downloading a 50-cent coupon for Cheerios cost you legal rights?

    General Mills, the maker of iconic cereals like Cheerios and Chex as well as brands like Bisquick and Betty Crocker, has quietly added language to its website to alert consumers that they give up their right to sue the company if they download coupons, “join” it in online communities like Facebook, enter a company-sponsored sweepstakes or contest or interact with it in a variety of other ways.

    In language added on Tuesday after The New York Times contacted it about the changes, General Mills seemed to go even further, suggesting that buying its products would bind consumers to those terms.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/17/business/when-liking-a-brand-online-voids-the-right-to-sue.html?hpw&rref=business
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:42 AM GMT
    This is nothing new. Read your cell phone terms of service. By even having an active account, you agree not to sue. Any disputes must go through arbitration through a third party, chosen by the cell phone company. Also, there's verbiage that allows them to change the rules/terms at any point without advanced notice.
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:44 AM GMT
    But if I download a sales coupon for a package of spaghetti, I don't typically think that am given up my constitutional right to be heard by a judge.
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:46 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidBut if I download a sales coupon for a package of spaghetti, I don't typically think that am given up my constitutional right to be heard by a judge.

    Constitutional rights? We're talking about spaghetti.
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:52 AM GMT
    Thanks for posting.
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    Apr 17, 2014 2:24 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    woodsmen saidBut if I download a sales coupon for a package of spaghetti, I don't typically think that am given up my constitutional right to be heard by a judge.

    Constitutional rights? We're talking about spaghetti.
    The right to be heard in court to get resolution by a judge or jury. This is a constitutional right.
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    Apr 17, 2014 2:31 AM GMT
    The best solution 'in my firm belief' is to boycott their products and speak about it and educate others as well...
    This is how I managed to talk some of my friends out of going into fast-food restaurants/chains like KFC, McD, etc.
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    Apr 17, 2014 5:04 AM GMT
    You bet. I put arbitration clauses into all of my sales agreements or contracts. It's just basic protection against predators and parasites. Who but a low-life scumbag would sue over a bowl of breakfast cereal in the first place?
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    Apr 17, 2014 5:07 AM GMT
    Besides obviating the constitutional right to judge/jury, these companies are bypassing each state's consumer protection.
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    Apr 17, 2014 5:27 AM GMT
    Exactly what constitutional right are you imagining here?
    And "consumer protection" is just a buzz-word for rabid lawyers run amok. Besides,there is nothing in these clauses that would protect the companies if they violated any law.
  • tj85016

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    Apr 17, 2014 6:13 AM GMT
    ^^

    well there is a difference between clicking a "like" on a web page and absolving any future legal recourse and signing a contract - but fuck the lawyers anyway (until you need one)
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    Apr 17, 2014 1:34 PM GMT
    seriously, arguments in here trying to relate liking on facebook to a sale / contract / any sort of business transaction is way off-base