First Earth-Sized, Potentially Habitable Exoplanet Found

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2014 11:54 PM GMT
    Five hundred light years from Earth, Kepler-186f orbits in the habitable zone of its red dwarf star.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/deep/first-earth-sized-potentially-habitable-exoplanet-found-16705380?click=pm_latest
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    Apr 19, 2014 1:00 AM GMT
    They probably worship Jesus too.

  • Apr 19, 2014 12:56 PM GMT
    Xavier92 saidThey probably worship Jesus too.


    Or Jor-El
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Apr 19, 2014 3:00 PM GMT
    Intriguing discovery, but I understand that much would be different, assuming that it is indeed, a rocky world with an atmosphere close to our own. Light different, who knows what kind of axial rotation or movement around such a star.

    Also I think we shouldn't jump to conclusions that other planet groups will be like our own solar system.... I'm sure we will discover worlds with different sorts of atmospheres... small gas worlds... who knows! But not to play down the discovery.. awesome to know there are other potentials out there!
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Apr 19, 2014 3:15 PM GMT
    A truly ground breaking discovery.

    Given the sheer number of planets out there, it`s probably only a matter of time before they find an Earthlike world orbiting a sunlike star with life.
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    Apr 19, 2014 4:22 PM GMT
    I really hope that in my lifetime I get to witness space travel. There are so many things that can be discovered in the Universe and being able to travel to another planet would be a monumental achievement for any person.
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    Apr 19, 2014 4:31 PM GMT
    Isn't Pluto an ex ol' planet?icon_lol.gif
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    Apr 19, 2014 4:33 PM GMT
    iadEndresen saidI really hope that in my lifetime I get to witness space travel.


    Huh? Unless you were born on Mars, there was just another 'space travel' trip to & from the International Space Station in the past month.
    Or do you mean "commerical" travel.
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    Apr 19, 2014 4:59 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidFive hundred light years from Earth, Kepler-186f orbits in the habitable zone of its red dwarf star.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/deep/first-earth-sized-potentially-habitable-exoplanet-found-16705380?click=pm_latest


    Fabulous, when do we move in?
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    Apr 19, 2014 5:10 PM GMT
    as a species we should probably figure out how not to destroy everything in our path first before moving on to interplanetary colonization
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    Apr 19, 2014 5:48 PM GMT
    YUNGMORENO saidas a species we should probably figure out how not to destroy everything in our path first before moving on to interplanetary colonization

    -AGREED!
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    Apr 19, 2014 5:52 PM GMT
    YUNGMORENO saidas a species we should probably figure out how not to destroy everything in our path first before moving on to interplanetary colonization


    I really doubt we will make it that far.
  • piltdown

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    Apr 19, 2014 5:58 PM GMT
    GigoloAssassinFabulous, when do we move in?


    With current tech, it would take about 20000 years to get there. We're not going anytime soon.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Apr 19, 2014 6:29 PM GMT
    The name they assigned to the planet, "Kepler-186f," shows considerable thought and imagination. Such a romantic and elegant name will arouse the interest of people interested in space.

    There is a limit to what the Kepler telescope can reveal. For example, we know nothing about its rotational axis. It could even be that its rotational axis is 90 degrees to its orbital axis which would drastically increase the effect of seasons.
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Apr 19, 2014 6:52 PM GMT
    piltdown said
    GigoloAssassinFabulous, when do we move in?


    With current tech, it would take about 20000 years to get there. We're not going anytime soon.


    Hope it will be a meal flight icon_razz.gif
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Apr 19, 2014 7:06 PM GMT
    SomeSicilianoGuy said
    piltdown said
    GigoloAssassinFabulous, when do we move in?


    With current tech, it would take about 20000 years to get there. We're not going anytime soon.


    Hope it will be a meal flight icon_razz.gif


    It won't be a meal flight. All passengers and crew members will have to be put into suspended animation so that they will live for the 20,000 years required to reach the exoplanet. Unless, that is, a way can be found to travel at many times the speed of light but it is believed that the laws of physics make that impossible.
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    Apr 19, 2014 7:38 PM GMT
    FRE0 said Unless, that is, a way can be found to travel at many times the speed of light but it is believed that the laws of physics make that impossible.

    Relativity theory shows that mass becomes infinitely large at c (light speed) and time slows to a standstill. This is why c is an ultimate limit.
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    Apr 19, 2014 9:55 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidLight different, who knows what kind of axial rotation or movement around such a star.
    I pray that it's a 36 hour rotation...
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1765

    Apr 19, 2014 10:55 PM GMT
    That is so amazing, I'm just sad that I won't be alive to see the day we actually reach another liveable planet.
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 662

    Apr 19, 2014 11:25 PM GMT
    500 light years is relatively close, yet it is very far. There are likely many planets in our neighborhood which are habitable. However, finding stars with habitable planets in our neighborhood which support life at the same time as our planet is much less likely. There are likely many habitable planets which had life with some intelligence or will have have life at some later date. The number of planets with life at the same level of development or greater than Earth is likely to be very small. To find that, it is likely the search would take us very far from our neighborhood.

    Consider that our home, Earth, is five billion years old. Primates have only been around for about 60 million years. Homo sapiens sapiens, the only species on Earth likely to be able to communicate beyond our planet, has been around for perhaps 200,000 years. The window of time for communications between planets is quite small. In the last fifty years or so, we have been trying to detect signals and send signals beyond Earth. How long will our species last? At the rate we are going, we may last only a few more generations. Unless we change how we manage our environment, we have less than a few hundred years window of communication, maybe much less. I suspect that if intelligent life has developed on other planets, it may have similar problems.

    If we have living neighbors who can do what we do or better, they are likely far beyond any travel possibility. I'm still interested in finding out more about what there is in the cosmos. It is just that I have concluded that our odds of finding beings to communicate with are very low indeed.
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    Apr 19, 2014 11:27 PM GMT
    500 light years away and you just KNOW they already have a Cher impersonator...
  • piltdown

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    Apr 19, 2014 11:46 PM GMT
    ElectroShark said
    FRE0 said Unless, that is, a way can be found to travel at many times the speed of light but it is believed that the laws of physics make that impossible.

    Relativity theory shows that mass becomes infinitely large at c (light speed) and time slows to a standstill. This is why c is an ultimate limit.


    Nothing says that the space around the space ship has to move slower, though. Hence, Alcubierre drive. icon_smile.gif
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Apr 19, 2014 11:50 PM GMT
    Republican response:

    death-star-o.gif
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    Apr 20, 2014 2:31 AM GMT
    iadEndresen saidI really hope that in my lifetime I get to witness space travel. There are so many things that can be discovered in the Universe and being able to travel to another planet would be a monumental achievement for any person.



    And I'm sure you'll be able to afford to go on such an adventure.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Apr 20, 2014 7:52 AM GMT
    rdberg1957 said...Homo sapiens sapiens, the only species on Earth likely to be able to communicate beyond our planet, has been around for perhaps 200,000 years….
    Typical human specism. The Psilocybe genus has been communicating (and migrating) extraterrestrially throughout our galaxy for billions of years.