Bullying Causes Decades of Harm, New Study Shows

  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Apr 22, 2014 8:17 PM GMT
    Bullying Causes Decades of Harm, New Study Shows


    "Childhood bullying is so profoundly scarring that its negative social, physical, economic, and mental health effects are measurable for decades to come, a new study finds."


    http://www.bilerico.com/2014/04/bullying_causes_decades_of_harm_new_study_shows.php




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    Apr 22, 2014 8:22 PM GMT
    metta8 saidBullying Causes Decades of Harm, New Study Shows


    "Childhood bullying is so profoundly scarring that its negative social, physical, economic, and mental health effects are measurable for decades to come, a new study finds."


    http://www.bilerico.com/2014/04/bullying_causes_decades_of_harm_new_study_shows.php



    good read
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    Apr 22, 2014 9:32 PM GMT
    Bullied throughout middle school. Ended in 8th grade.

    It might as well have ended yesterday. I feel uncomfortable being stared or at laughed at. No matter how much I lose, I never like what I see in the mirror. I can be an excellent person and still not like anything about myself. Almost took my own life in 11th grade.

    I can honestly say that I took over the bullying when they stopped. I put myself down more in a day than others have in a month.
  • CSPYNY

    Posts: 187

    Apr 22, 2014 10:44 PM GMT
    I was bullied as a kid for being overweight. Still causes some issues, but, for the most part I think I have managed to get it past me.

    What's funny is - the worst offenders are larger now than I was back then. Karma.
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    Apr 22, 2014 11:08 PM GMT
    owl_bundy saidsad enough, this is very true. icon_sad.gif speaking from experience.

    bullies are evil. icon_sad.gif


    +100 icon_sad.gif
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    Apr 23, 2014 12:03 AM GMT
    Bullying can cause life-long damage to ones sense of well being. I'm actually convinced that it can lead to PTSD, or something similar to it.

    I was called ugly when I was in middle school and high school. I was ostracized, ridiculed, and basically made to feel like I wasn't even a human being. Even today it's hard for me to see my own reflection in the mirror.
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    Apr 23, 2014 12:04 AM GMT
    Just a heads up: I might sound like a dick for this, but...

    I HATE. HATE. HATE. the title of the article (not the actual study's title, but the opinion piece's title). The study was prospective, namely an observational study, which is not experimental. You can't say that bullying causes decades of harm without specifically controlling the necessary variables (which would most likely be unethical for a developmental psychological study like this).

    I'm not denying that bullying leads to the problems discussed in the article, but we can't say that bullying completely causes these issues. When you discuss a descriptive study, in this case a prospective design, all you can say is that bullying is a strong predictor of the discussed negative effects in later adult life.

    Journalists, writers, bloggers, etc. need to understand science before they write an article discussing a piece of scientific literature.

    Other than that, it was a good read, and brings necessary awareness to the sad epidemic we call bullying, but the science nerd in me had to correct the author.
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    Apr 23, 2014 12:14 AM GMT
    I fully agree with the Research in that provided Article link!

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    Apr 23, 2014 12:44 AM GMT
    Damn. There are some sad stories here.

    I wasn't bullied but there were some pretty tough customers in my middle school and any hint of being gay was tantamount to suicide. High school wasn't bad at all. Maybe I was good at steering clear of assholes.

    I'm always baffled by the evidence that kids today seem to be enduring even more targeted aggression than my generation faced. Logic tells me that an increasingly tolerant society (and we have to admit that in general people are more accepting of homosexuality, of the concept of diversity, etc.) should mean less bullying, and I'm not sure what sustains and even enhances the atmosphere for it.

    I don't know, maybe the internet has a huge role in the conveyance of the phenomenon. Before information became so immediately available we had very few conduits for news about things like this.

    Whatever the case, it's heartbreaking to hear people relate such sad reflections on childhood.
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    Apr 23, 2014 12:59 AM GMT
    Corridore said

    I'm always baffled by the evidence that kids today seem to be enduring even more targeted aggression than my generation faced. Logic tells me that an increasingly tolerant society (and we have to admit that in general people are more accepting of homosexuality, of the concept of diversity, etc.) should mean less bullying, and I'm not sure what sustains and even enhances the atmosphere for it.

    I don't know, maybe the internet has a huge role in the conveyance of the phenomenon. Before information became so immediately available we had very few conduits for news about things like this.


    I think the issue of social media makes it easier to target one student. Before, you had to do in in school. Now you can get together with friends on your phone and then at home and target them relentlessly.

    But it does seem like the online bullying is mostly targeted to girls and not boys.
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    Apr 23, 2014 1:01 AM GMT
    I had pretty intense physical and verbal bullying unrelated to my sexuality up until I was 16. I think I must have just been an easy target.

    Around about this time I was at a LAN party with friends and other guys from school and someone found some of my porn on my PC (Bit careless on my part I must say..), so the bullying went into overdrive from then until the end of high school.

    I would say it's definitely still leaving it's mark now at 32.
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    Apr 23, 2014 3:07 AM GMT
    I was in college when Columbine happened, and in my sociology class, we sat down and had a very serious discussion about what the root causes were. Some of the students just simply parroted whatever the media was saying, and then others, like myself, took a very different approach.

    In the aftermath of Columbine, everyone was so quick to look at guns, video games, and music. To me, those are convenient targets that avoid the real issue. Casting blame at the entertainment industry, or at firearms, makes people feel like they're making a difference without actually looking at whether or not society itself is to blame.

    You see, the same kids who torment others at school, whether physically or psychologically, are probably being raised by adults who were bullies themselves at that age. Indeed, the parents of such children are probably bullies as adults when it comes to the workplace. When teachers and administrators witness this type of behavior, as was the case at Columbine, and do nothing, they become part of the problem.

    With very very few exceptions, I believe that people are born with a desire to do the right thing. I don't believe that people are born to be dangerous and violent. Those are learned traits from ones upbringing. When you suffer through years of abuse, having people treat you as less than human, and you see authority figures doing nothing to stop it (and worse, punishing you for defending yourself) you eventually believe that your life is worthless.

    Well..how many kids take their own life each year because of bullying? Apparently, quite a lot, since sociologists coined the term "bullycide" in 2001.

    http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/bullying-and-suicide.html

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide claims the lives of nearly 4,400 young people in America every year. Now...suppose that only 1% of those were as a direct result of being bullied. If studies in the United Kingdom are any indicator, bullying is probably a factor in 1/2 of all youth suicides, but even at 1% that would still be 44 deaths per year due to bullying, which is nearly three times the number who died at Columbine. Can you imagine the national outrage that would follow if massacres like Columbine happened three times a year?

    What I find the most tragic about the whole situation was that it wasn't until a massacre took place that people even discussed bullying. There were no doubt hundreds of young people over the years whose lives were lost when they could no longer withstand the abuse, and yet their cries went unnoticed. There were no moments of silence, no candles lit, no ribbons tied around trees, and no teddy bears laid at the school steps. Out of sight, out of mind.
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    Apr 23, 2014 5:55 AM GMT
    Great article.

    I was bullied all through middle and high school for being gay, even though I was in the closet. It's one of the reasons I haven't opened up about my sexuality very often. The effects really do last. Even after getting through it, gaining a lot of self confidence, and making new friends, I still think back on it and those feelings of dread and hate surge up again. I realize it's stupid when it happens because my life is completely different now but yet it remains.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Apr 23, 2014 6:31 AM GMT
    I was bullied from grade 9 through grade 12. It was especially bad in grades 11 and 12 when I was a preppy at a boarding school. In my case, it did cause considerable damage, mainly by making it difficult to trust other people. Of course to a considerable degree recovery is possible, but probably no more than perhaps 75% recovery. There is always a residual that from time to time causes problems.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Apr 23, 2014 6:40 AM GMT
    The_Iceman saidI was in college when Columbine happened, and in my sociology class, we sat down and had a very serious discussion about what the root causes were. Some of the students just simply parroted whatever the media was saying, and then others, like myself, took a very different approach.

    In the aftermath of Columbine, everyone was so quick to look at guns, video games, and music. To me, those are convenient targets that avoid the real issue. Casting blame at the entertainment industry, or at firearms, makes people feel like they're making a difference without actually looking at whether or not society itself is to blame.

    You see, the same kids who torment others at school, whether physically or psychologically, are probably being raised by adults who were bullies themselves at that age. Indeed, the parents of such children are probably bullies as adults when it comes to the workplace. When teachers and administrators witness this type of behavior, as was the case at Columbine, and do nothing, they become part of the problem.

    With very very few exceptions, I believe that people are born with a desire to do the right thing. I don't believe that people are born to be dangerous and violent. Those are learned traits from ones upbringing. When you suffer through years of abuse, having people treat you as less than human, and you see authority figures doing nothing to stop it (and worse, punishing you for defending yourself) you eventually believe that your life is worthless.

    Well..how many kids take their own life each year because of bullying? Apparently, quite a lot, since sociologists coined the term "bullycide" in 2001.

    http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/bullying-and-suicide.html

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide claims the lives of nearly 4,400 young people in America every year. Now...suppose that only 1% of those were as a direct result of being bullied. If studies in the United Kingdom are any indicator, bullying is probably a factor in 1/2 of all youth suicides, but even at 1% that would still be 44 deaths per year due to bullying, which is nearly three times the number who died at Columbine. Can you imagine the national outrage that would follow if massacres like Columbine happened three times a year?

    What I find the most tragic about the whole situation was that it wasn't until a massacre took place that people even discussed bullying. There were no doubt hundreds of young people over the years whose lives were lost when they could no longer withstand the abuse, and yet their cries went unnoticed. There were no moments of silence, no candles lit, no ribbons tied around trees, and no teddy bears laid at the school steps. Out of sight, out of mind.


    Sometimes there were no cries.

    My parents had a "blame the victim" attitude and as a result, my brother, sister, and I new better than to take problems to them. Also, I was ashamed that I was being bullied and did my best to hide the fact. The one time I slugged a tormenter, I cut my knuckles on his teeth and had to see the school nurse because I didn't have a first aid kit; the nurse blamed me!

    My first roommate, when I was a preppy in the 11th grade of a boarding school, tried to get me to give him a "blow job"; he did not succeed. It took me a few months to find a way to change rooms and until then, having to share a room with him was a constant source of trauma and tension. I was afraid that if I complained to the dean that I would be blamed, a fear which I continue to believe was rational.
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    Apr 24, 2014 2:20 AM GMT
    Thank you for posting this great (albeit utterly sad/sobering) article! Pushed to Facebook, etc. icon_exclaim.gif
  • Midas426

    Posts: 965

    Apr 24, 2014 3:50 AM GMT
    FLgator said

    I think the issue of social media makes it easier to target one student. Before, you had to do in in school. Now you can get together with friends on your phone and then at home and target them relentlessly.

    But it does seem like the online bullying is mostly targeted to girls and not boys.
    As a former bullied kid I shudder to think how my life would've been if I had grown up with social media. At least once I got home from school, the bullying stopped. Would hate the thought of being bullied online as well. I truly feel for today's bullied kids.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 24, 2014 3:51 AM GMT
    Man up, pussies.

    fat-kid-takes-down-bully-o.gif
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Apr 24, 2014 4:12 AM GMT
    Jack_NNJ saidMan up, pussies.

    fat-kid-takes-down-bully-o.gif


    says the loser from a two bit mafiaso town
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    Apr 24, 2014 4:36 AM GMT
    Bullying by children is sad and offensive. Bullying by adults is demented.

    I've been trying to eradicate the bullies from this site since I arrived and wish more of you would support those efforts instead of cowering in the corner.

    Sadly, a small but vocal contingent of sociopaths gives the bullies all the encouragement they need. When they go unchallenged, it just adds fuel to the fire.
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    Apr 24, 2014 4:46 AM GMT
    No disrespect to the study, evidence is evidence. I was bullied pretty much every day in High School. Verbally, physically, I was made to feel shamed for who I am.

    I came out to my close friends, then to my family. The more support I had, the stronger I grew. I sought therapy, but it was limited. I didn't need it for years or decades. I just needed to cope with I was/am, and what I was dealing with at the time. Logic went a long way.

    Love yourself and live your life, fully and wholeheartedly. The rest will follow.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Apr 24, 2014 6:03 AM GMT
    Mustang31894 saidJust a heads up: I might sound like a dick for this, but...

    I HATE. HATE. HATE. the title of the article (not the actual study's title, but the opinion piece's title). The study was prospective, namely an observational study, which is not experimental. You can't say that bullying causes decades of harm without specifically controlling the necessary variables (which would most likely be unethical for a developmental psychological study like this).

    I'm not denying that bullying leads to the problems discussed in the article, but we can't say that bullying completely causes these issues. When you discuss a descriptive study, in this case a prospective design, all you can say is that bullying is a strong predictor of the discussed negative effects in later adult life.

    Journalists, writers, bloggers, etc. need to understand science before they write an article discussing a piece of scientific literature.

    Other than that, it was a good read, and brings necessary awareness to the sad epidemic we call bullying, but the science nerd in me had to correct the author.

    Good point.

    I think many victims of bullying suffer for decades. Others end up learning that success is its own revenge.

    I've been bullied, tormented, self-destructive, etc. I've also experienced being on top of the world and celebrated.

    It seems like most people have been mistreated at some point their lives. People who say they've never been bullied always seem sort of naive, like they're sheltered from ever having to learn to cope with adversity. Lucky them... I guess.

    I would never condone bullying, but if someone hands you lemonade add vodka to it. It'll build character.icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 24, 2014 9:22 AM GMT
    owl_bundy saidbullies are evil. icon_sad.gif


    Coming straight from the horses mouth. Or shall I say, the owl's ass icon_lol.gif
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    Apr 24, 2014 9:35 AM GMT
    th3ro said
    Around about this time I was at a LAN party with friends and other guys from school and someone found some of my porn on my PC (Bit careless on my part I must say..), so the bullying went into overdrive from then until the end of high school.

    I would say it's definitely still leaving it's mark now at 32.


    Well, although your experience sounds bad, what the fuck were you doing with porn on your PC in high school, namely gay porn? I'd say that's an issue right there. I didn't even start engaging with gay porn til my 20s. I can't imagine even doing that in high school days.

    Then again, I can't talk cuz I was doing waaaaay more than porn back then my dayum self. Good lawd those were the days. Hard to believe I lasted 7 years before I ever caught my first STD lol.
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    Apr 24, 2014 11:30 AM GMT
    Homechooling and online education should address that quite nicely.