37% of Adults Can't Swim A 25-Yard Pool

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    Apr 29, 2014 1:15 AM GMT
    NYT: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 37 percent of adults cannot swim the length of a 25-yard pool, meaning they probably could not make it to shore if they got into trouble in a natural body of water.

    You might think children are the most vulnerable to drowning. Not so. While drowning has declined over all from 1999 to 2010, according to new data from the C.D.C., children and young adults account for the drop. Among adults ages 45 to 84, drownings increased nearly 10 percent. More than 70 percent of those who drown each year in the United States are adults, and the percentage of drownings in lakes, rivers and oceans rises with age. Nearly 80 percent of drowning victims are boys or men.

    Fear of the water keeps many adults from learning to swim. And they may pass this reluctance on to their children, perpetuating a vicious cycle.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/28/a-stroke-you-must-have/?hpw&rref=health
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Apr 29, 2014 11:25 AM GMT
    Neither of my parents can swim, but they made sure that all of my siblings and I learned at an early age. I can still remember sitting at the edge of an unheated public pool in Ohio (where winter feels like it lasts until May), hating the prospect of getting in that freezing water. But I'm really glad they hauled us to those lessons because it instilled in me a deep love of swimming that has lasted a lifetime.
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    Apr 29, 2014 12:27 PM GMT
    And THAT would be me. LOL icon_sad.gif I'm kinda hydrophobic.
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    Apr 29, 2014 1:32 PM GMT
    DanOmatic saidNeither of my parents can swim, but they made sure that all of my siblings and I learned at an early age. I can still remember sitting at the edge of an unheated public pool in Ohio (where winter feels like it lasts until May), hating the prospect of getting in that freezing water. But I'm really glad they hauled us to those lessons because it instilled in me a deep love of swimming that has lasted a lifetime.
    I wouldn't say I have a deep love for swimming but forcing me to learn how to swim properly was definitely one of the few things my parents did right.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Apr 29, 2014 2:20 PM GMT
    I hated having to take P. E. in college, but I thought that they were very wise in requiring all students to be able to swim before graduating.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Apr 29, 2014 2:36 PM GMT
    TerraFirma saidAnd THAT would be me. LOL icon_sad.gif I'm kinda hydrophobic.
    That is highly unfortunate because with your ripped, rock hard physique, you would look super sexy in a speedo swimming laps in a 25 yard poolicon_biggrin.gif
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Apr 29, 2014 2:40 PM GMT
    I teach kids how to swim. Most are about 2-6 years old that I teach, they are great to work with.
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    Apr 29, 2014 2:53 PM GMT
    I taught drown-proofing in college, mostly to my ROTC cadets as a mandatory class, but also open to other students. My Mother was a lifeguard in the 1930s, and still a strong swimmer when I was growing up in the 1950s & 60s. She'd dive right into the ocean surf like a salmon swimming upstream, I never could keep up with her.

    Today I wouldn't sink, but my lowered stamina is such that a long swim would exhaust me. So I'd fall back on my drown-proofing techniques, try to stay afloat until rescued, and hope currents didn't sweep me away.

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Apr 29, 2014 3:17 PM GMT
    I guess I'm not surprised at this study considering the obesity issue in this country and how few people get exercise and certainly not swimming. I read a study several years ago that many people would swim more, except they don't want others to see what they look like in a swimming suit... how sad!

    icon_mad.gif
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Apr 29, 2014 3:24 PM GMT
    I've lived around water most of my life and I'm not a great swimmer. Never mastered the technique of head down, exhale, turn, inhale, head down, etc. But I scuba and snorkel so I guess I'm not too much at risk. But just my observation from living at the beach is guys tend to be bigger risk takers than women and I bet that is a big part of why more men drown. Women tend to stay on or near shore, men venture further.
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    Apr 29, 2014 3:40 PM GMT
    Anyday...
    ijJi5JQ8MpusU.gif

    *wait I'm not entirely into swimming but into Diving...is diving same as swimming as to fishes in water?

    1336364503hmmm-gif.gif

    Yeah some sort must be, but my parents were claim to be "good swimmers" but I've never seen them swimming "Swimming" like icon_confused.gif
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    Apr 29, 2014 3:42 PM GMT
    ^ Giggles!
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    Apr 29, 2014 5:50 PM GMT
    TerraFirma saidAnd THAT would be me. LOL icon_sad.gif I'm kinda hydrophobic.

    LOL
    Hydrophobia doesn't mean fear of water.
    It means you're rabid.
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    Apr 29, 2014 7:11 PM GMT
    Swim lessons start for me on May 14! I can swim about 10m but that's it. After that I'm toast. I was petrified of the water when I was a kid. I think I must have picked it up from my mom. I always knew she hated water but found out a few years ago she had a bad experience.

    Her parents had a lake in their back yard (long story) and when she was 16 her friend drowned in it. My mom had set the kid's hair in curls in the morning and agreed to do it again in the afternoon when the body was on the dining table getting prepared for the wake (!!!! At that time and place wakes were held at a person's home a lot of times). Now I get why my mom was so stressed out about the water.

    She tried to get me into lessons when I was eight but I freaked out so she pulled me out.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Apr 30, 2014 4:22 AM GMT
    It's never too late to learn! You'll be glad you did if you do.
  • 3014Beachgoer

    Posts: 44

    Apr 30, 2014 4:46 AM GMT
    I was 14 when I first learned how to swim... And now I like to dive underwater and swim the whole length of my pool underwater...
  • ja89

    Posts: 789

    Apr 30, 2014 5:17 AM GMT
    I learned how to swim at 14, when I tried out for my high school team. Glad I did because now my whole family knows how to swim. I made sure they knew how to be comfortable in deep water. I might start adult swim lessons soon. I miss teaching/coaching swimming.
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    Apr 30, 2014 5:59 AM GMT
    60% of adults fall into the trash category.
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    Apr 30, 2014 8:13 PM GMT
    I don't think it has changed, but then California schools have so declined; however, one couldn't graduate from high school until one could swim the crawl the length of a regulation pool and back. I recall my sophomore year being "cleared" to graduate in PE class when we had the graduation swim test.
  • biYguy

    Posts: 46

    May 01, 2014 4:15 AM GMT
    YVRguy saidSwim lessons start for me on May 14! I can swim about 10m but that's it. After that I'm toast. I was petrified of the water when I was a kid….


    Good luck with your swim lessons!

    I learned to swim only a few years ago by taking some lessons. I now incorporate swimming laps twice a week in my fitness routine.

    I too was petrified of water as a kid and I still fear swimming in deep water. I usually swim in a pool with a water depth of 1.2 metres. Occasionally, I use a deeper pool to work on my fear.
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    May 01, 2014 9:53 AM GMT
    That's news. In the Pacific Northwest where I had worked as a lifeguard, parents always came with children to swim in pools or lakes. So I just assume all people must know how to swim or do the "dog paddle". icon_surprised.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 02, 2014 3:13 PM GMT
    Swimming is something that I take for granted, like walking. If I had kids, I would make sure they could function on land and in water.
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    May 02, 2014 6:02 PM GMT
    Growing up in the midwest, with thousands of swimable lakes and rivers, it was important to be able to swim. Don't remember why I waited so long, but my mother taught me to swim in about one hour when I was 8. I guess she thought it was about time. I have been swimming ever since. Now I swim between 1/2 to 1 mile every couple days at the gym pool. I think everyone should learn when they are a child - you never know when you might later go fishing, water-skiing, or take a cruise on an Italian liner or a Korean ferry, where it might be an essential life skill.
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    Jun 11, 2014 3:30 AM GMT
    I remember learning to swim at the Y... you started out as a tadpole or whatever... work your way up to shark haha.

    I just started swimming again again this week and i'm so happy to be back in the pool!icon_biggrin.gif