Which Industry Will Tech Put Out of Business Next?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 3:38 AM GMT
    NYT:

    “Higher education. Diamond mining.”
    EV WILLIAMS

    “Drivers, auto mechanics, auto parts and auto insurance.”
    CLARA SHIH

    “Consumer banking. Tech will unbundle banking for loans, payments, asset management and so on.”
    REID HOFFMAN

    “Airline pilots.”
    SEBASTIAN THRUN

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/05/02/upshot/FUTURE.html?hp
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    May 03, 2014 3:39 AM GMT
    Taxi drivers
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    May 03, 2014 4:34 AM GMT
    lawyers
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    May 03, 2014 6:11 AM GMT
    I blame Obama.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 6:30 AM GMT
    Supermarket checkers in large supermarkets - will need fewer FOH staff
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    May 03, 2014 7:19 AM GMT
    Waiters in restaurants
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    May 03, 2014 7:35 AM GMT
    Ohno saidWaiters in restaurants


    Nah people love that shit
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    May 03, 2014 10:52 AM GMT
    smartmoney saidI blame Obama.

    Blame Al Gore. After all, he DID invent the internet, right? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    May 03, 2014 4:32 PM GMT
    Ohno saidWaiters in restaurants
    In that instance every single restaurant would become a buffet.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    May 03, 2014 4:34 PM GMT
    BillandChuck said
    smartmoney saidI blame Obama.

    Blame Al Gore. After all, he DID invent the internet, right? icon_rolleyes.gif
    Its Bush's fault don't you knowicon_question.gificon_lol.gif
  • Laves

    Posts: 39

    May 03, 2014 4:56 PM GMT
    Maybe not next...but I believe sometime down the road healthcare professions will be changed because of Tech. Less nurses and primary care physicians.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    May 03, 2014 5:40 PM GMT
    All this latest technology is doing is creating more serious unemployment problems by eliminating people's livelihoods. It is time to clamp down on all this inventing if all they are going to do is eliminate jobs. What are people supposed to do for a livelihoodicon_question.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 03, 2014 5:50 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidAll this latest technology is doing is creating more serious unemployment problems by eliminating people's livelihoods. It is time to clamp down on all this inventing if all they are going to do is eliminate jobs. What are people supposed to do for a livelihoodicon_question.gif

    Invent things
    Sell the things other people invent

    Same old, same old...
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    May 03, 2014 6:07 PM GMT
    This paradigm is as old as human existence. Seriously - adapt, and get used to it. The medical industry is still exploding - all over - because they need people to work the machines, etc.

    Chillax. icon_cool.gif
  • Laves

    Posts: 39

    May 03, 2014 6:14 PM GMT
    manboynyc saidThis paradigm is as old as human existence. Seriously - adapt, and get used to it. The medical industry is still exploding - all over - because they need people to work the machines, etc.

    Chillax. icon_cool.gif


    +1
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    May 03, 2014 8:01 PM GMT
    Snaz saidSupermarket checkers in large supermarkets - will need fewer FOH staff


    Actually, in a lot of places self checkouts are being reduced or removed; too many people walking away with unpaid-for stuff.

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    May 03, 2014 8:54 PM GMT
    plumber:
    the use of reliable quick connect SharkBite fittings and Pex flexible tubing. The systems are super reliable, can freeze w/o damage, no lead/silver solder and easy to repair for the average Joe. Also flex gas pipe.

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    May 04, 2014 3:22 AM GMT
    humanity . . . the abolition of man is at hand . . .
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2014 4:59 AM GMT
    Fast Food.

    robots-are-starting-to-take-over-fast-fo
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    May 04, 2014 7:50 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    Snaz saidSupermarket checkers in large supermarkets - will need fewer FOH staff


    Actually, in a lot of places self checkouts are being reduced or removed; too many people walking away with unpaid-for stuff.



    Lol figures
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    May 04, 2014 3:02 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    Snaz saidSupermarket checkers in large supermarkets - will need fewer FOH staff


    Actually, in a lot of places self checkouts are being reduced or removed; too many people walking away with unpaid-for stuff.

    Not near us, thank God. They're increasing rapidly.
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    May 04, 2014 3:27 PM GMT
    manboynyc saidThis paradigm is as old as human existence. Seriously - adapt, and get used to it. The medical industry is still exploding - all over - because they need people to work the machines, etc.

    Chillax. icon_cool.gif


    Just not true. Large scale replacement of human labor by machines only began about 250 years ago in England and America with the invention of the steam engine and water loom, beginning a process of technological change that is only accelerating further with the development of "super robots" and artificially intelligent digital technologies that are further eliminating white and blue collar jobs alike.

    Now, robots with fine motor skills can assemble even the most delicate machinery, like wristwatches, and almost fully staff retail distribution warehouses that used to employ hundreds of workers driving fork lifts, stocking shelves and packing shipping boxes. And in office work, mobile tech has decimated the ranks of mid-level paper processing jobs in data entry, payroll, logistics etc. Even in medicine, AI programs are reading X rays, diagnosing diseases and automating complex databases that used to employ thousands of trained white collar professionals.

    The very nature of work is changing so quickly that not even the best minds in economics, business or government can fully keep up. But one thing is certain-- despite great increases in productivity and lower consumer costs resulting from all of this, there will simply be less high paid work for future generations, and more income inequality.

    Not much to chillax about.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    May 04, 2014 3:51 PM GMT
    Alexxx5 said
    manboynyc saidThis paradigm is as old as human existence. Seriously - adapt, and get used to it. The medical industry is still exploding - all over - because they need people to work the machines, etc.

    Chillax. icon_cool.gif


    Just not true. Large scale replacement of human labor by machines only began about 250 years ago in England and America with the invention of the steam engine and water loom, beginning a process of technological change that is only accelerating further with the development of "super robots" and artificially intelligent digital technologies that are further eliminating white and blue collar jobs alike.

    Now, robots with fine motor skills can assemble even the most delicate machinery, like wristwatches, and almost fully staff retail distribution warehouses that used to employ hundreds of workers driving fork lifts, stocking shelves and packing shipping boxes. And in office work, mobile tech has decimated the ranks of mid-level paper processing jobs in data entry, payroll, logistics etc. Even in medicine, AI programs are reading X rays, diagnosing diseases and automating complex databases that used to employ thousands of trained white collar professionals.

    The very nature of work is changing so quickly that not even the best minds in economics, business or government can fully keep up. But one thing is certain-- despite great increases in productivity and lower consumer costs resulting from all of this, there will simply be less high paid work for future generations, and more income inequality.

    Not much to chillax about.
    Thank you. I am an office/mailroom clerk who has had my hours slashed thanks to all this latest technology. The volume of mail has decreased steadily due to changes in auditing and billing processes. We are advancing way too fast for our own good and all these newest high tech inventions are just creating more unemployment. It is time for some tight clamping down on all this latest technology or there will be no good paying jobs left and virtually everyone will be living in crushing poverty. Thanks to the computer and techno geeks and the greedy corporate executives and bankersicon_mad.gif
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    May 04, 2014 3:57 PM GMT
    ^^ *Alexxx*

    you are exactly correct. I was an engineer in my early 20's and got involved in some electro-pneumatic-mechanical pick-and-place "robots"

    they were cheap to design and build and you can easily displace a worker for about $4-10k. Advances have made them even more sophisticated and simple to design.

    Apple could probably automate the manufacture of iPods, iPads and iPhones in the US and pull out of China completely for relatively cheap money (considering they have $100 billlion in the bank).

    Medical technology is doing more to displace skilled workers than to increase their rank (reading X-Rays, CAT, MRI scans, etc).

    Healthcare will provide thousands of jobs, but majority won't be middle-class jobs ($40-80k)
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    May 05, 2014 3:01 PM GMT
    Tech columnists at the Times.