New Meaning To Tough "Mudder".

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 7:49 AM GMT
    I'm sure this is old news to guys in the military that have had the joys of maneuvering through questionable waterways or low crawl through some ripe smelling mud. icon_lol.gif
    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/05/tough-mudder-feces-in-mouth/361588/
    Another Solid Reason Not to Do a Mud-Obstacle Run
    Endurance races that involve electrical shocks, ice baths, and pools of stagnant farm water are acutely popular. No one tells you about the bowel infections.
    JAMES HAMBLINMAY 2 2014, 2:35 PM ET

    On October 12, 2012, public health officials at Nellis Air Force Base outside Las Vegas, got an unsettling call. Their medical center’s emergency department reported that in the last three days, three active-duty military had come in with vomiting and bloody diarrhea. All said they had recently fallen face-first in mud, during a Tough Mudder obstacle-course event on a nearby cattle ranch in the town of Beatty the week prior.
    ...
    In response to these three cases, Nellis Public Health mobilized local and state officials in an investigation, the results of which were released yesterday by the CDC. The team ultimately identified 22 similar cases tied to that October 2012 Mudder, most likely caused by infection with the fecally transmitted bacterium Campylobacter coli.

    As the CDC reported there was a statistically significant association with "inadvertent swallowing of muddy water while competing" and Campylobacter infection. The investigators found no association with drinking water or eating food provided by event organizers. Participants did report seeing cattle and swine on or near the course on the day of the run.
    ...
    "These events typically are held in rural areas and often include man-made slurry fields (a mixture of soil or clay and water) as race 'challenges,'" the CDC offers. "In areas commonly frequented by animals, topsoil used in the creation of slurry fields can be contaminated with feces from domestic fowl, ruminants, or wild animals. Competitors who run or ride through such areas might unintentionally swallow sufficient numbers of organisms to cause clinical disease."

    The CDC also says doctors and public health professionals “should be aware that obstacle adventure race events could pose a heightened risk for outbreaks.”

    Nellis Public Health followed up by doing some educational outreach regarding the risk for disease when competing in such events, emphasizing hand washing and avoidance of ingestion of surface water and mud.

    "Participants also need to be encouraged to seek appropriate medical care for post-competition diarrhea," the CDC advises, "especially bloody diarrhea, and to inform medical personnel of their exposure." Apart from that, don't overthink it.
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    May 03, 2014 8:05 AM GMT
    More likely to get ill from eating out or doing other day to day stuff IMO.
    I've never got badly ill from stuff like this, only a bit of dehydration and a few cuts and bruses.
    I'm far more concerned about people under doing things than overdoing it, and there are too many crap messages telling people to take it easy in society today.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    May 03, 2014 10:36 AM GMT
    muscletussle saidMore likely to get ill from eating out or doing other day to day stuff IMO.
    I've never got badly ill from stuff like this, only a bit of dehydration and a few cuts and bruses.
    I'm far more concerned about people under doing things than overdoing it, and there are too many crap messages telling people to take it easy in society today.

    +1 (x2) If we heeded every warning, we'd live a short time avoiding all hazards, eating little and experiencing nothing. While there is certainly the possibility of contracting such maladies, they're about as likely as taking a lightning strike or an airline passenger being in a plane that crashes.
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    May 03, 2014 1:01 PM GMT
    Just yesterday I heard on the radio how riverbed mud fecal matter advisories were being given out at some local Tough Mudder competition because at the last event 16 participants got ill. I guess 16 isn't a big enough number to raise concern?
  • jlly_rnchr

    Posts: 1759

    May 03, 2014 2:49 PM GMT
    I did two mud runs in the past, and never fell ill. It's a lot of fun, totally worth the tiny risk of diarrhea.

    And they tend to be for a good cause, like fighting MS or cancer. Way more satisfying than writing a check.
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    May 03, 2014 4:43 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidJust yesterday I heard on the radio how riverbed mud fecal matter advisories were being given out at some local Tough Mudder competition because at the last event 16 participants got ill. I guess 16 isn't a big enough number to raise concern?
    This is the worst thing to tell me to get me to not participate. I look at this as another part of the challenge. I hardly ever get sick.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 03, 2014 4:50 PM GMT
    Wow, I had no idea about any of this.. interesting and pretty rough. I've had friends who have been participants in the past and don't remember any ill effects. Thanks for posting this!
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    May 03, 2014 8:11 PM GMT
    This is an interesting article; however, it is also hardly a public health crisis and nothing about which folks should be alarmed. I have competed in dozens of mud runs in the past few years (Tough Mudders, Warrior Dashes, Zombie Runs and Down & Dirty Mud Runs) without incident...except a broken rib in the MD Warrior Dash a few years ago. That last "exception" is actually an important note. There are more participants who are injured on other obstacles (walls, cargo nets, barbed wire, etc.) in these races than are sickened by contaminated water, including twisting/spraining/breaking ankles while simply running the course through the woods. I'm an infectious disease doc and recognize the risk associated with consumption of fecally-contaminated water and accept that risk along with all the other risks in these races. To me, the minimal risks are far outweighed by the rewards/benefits of competing in these events. I have completed two already this year and have four more mud runs, two 5Ks and the Army Ten-Miler on my calendar. While the article is a good "public service announcement," it will not dampen my spirit. I hope it doesn't dissuade anyone else from running in them. They're fun and they're great outdoor social events. If you're willing to accept the risks associated with trekking through cross-country courses, climbing 15-foot walls, descending those same walls and crawling under barbed wire, then add this as one more risk about which you should be aware...and take the appropriate precautions.
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    May 03, 2014 8:38 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidJust yesterday I heard on the radio how riverbed mud fecal matter advisories were being given out at some local Tough Mudder competition because at the last event 16 participants got ill. I guess 16 isn't a big enough number to raise concern?


    Last year, several hundred runners got sick from Norovirus at a Tough Mudder in Michigan. I ran it, fortunately without catching it. The county health department did a full investigation, even though the tun organizers tried their best to cover it up. They were able to identify the first start time after which people got sick, and noted that mostly those who reported getting substantial amounts of muddy water in their mouth fell ill. They concluded that someone must have defecated into one of the mud pools. Yikes! The Tough Mudder organization didn't care, the never informed the runners.
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    May 03, 2014 8:41 PM GMT
    Yeah, I think some people are more susceptible to getting sick than others. But I think the main point to take away from this is that organizers need to make sure all the participants are aware of the potential risks involved. Bloody diarrhea is something no one wants. icon_lol.gif
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    May 03, 2014 8:43 PM GMT
    Whipmagic saidLast year, several hundred runners got sick from Norovirus at a Tough Mudder in Michigan. I ran it, fortunately without catching it. The county health department did a full investigation, even though the tun organizers tried their best to cover it up. They were able to identify the first start time after which people got sick, and noted that mostly those who reported getting substantial amounts of muddy water in their mouth fell ill. They concluded that someone must have defecated into one of the mud pools. Yikes! The Tough Mudder organization didn't care, the never informed the runners.

    That's awful. Getting sick is one thing, but trying to cover it up is pretty bad.
  • Beeftastic

    Posts: 1747

    May 03, 2014 10:16 PM GMT
    Well if you read some of the recent coverage about the immune system and exposure to dirt and pathogens in the environment, we all need more mud and feces in our lives.

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    May 03, 2014 10:24 PM GMT
    Beeftastic saidWell if you read some of the recent coverage about the immune system and exposure to dirt and pathogens in the environment, we all need more mud and feces in our lives.

    Ah-hah, so my fears about rimming are bogus. And mothers needn't worry about kids picking up and eating crap off the ground. icon_twisted.gif
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    May 04, 2014 3:07 AM GMT
    Beeftastic saidWell if you read some of the recent coverage about the immune system and exposure to dirt and pathogens in the environment, we all need more mud and feces in our lives.


    I eat fast food once a week. I think I'm ok with my dosage of dirt and bacterium. icon_lol.gif
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    May 04, 2014 7:59 AM GMT
    Beeftastic saidWell if you read some of the recent coverage about the immune system and exposure to dirt and pathogens in the environment, we all need more mud and feces in our lives.
    Thank you. I eat food off the floor. Regularly. It actually helps me avoid getting sick.
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    May 05, 2014 6:43 PM GMT
    Trolliosis said
    Beeftastic saidWell if you read some of the recent coverage about the immune system and exposure to dirt and pathogens in the environment, we all need more mud and feces in our lives.
    Thank you. I eat food off the floor. Regularly. It actually helps me avoid getting sick.



    ...its the "5 second rule"...lol!
  • Import

    Posts: 7185

    May 09, 2014 7:55 PM GMT
    I just dont understand the appeal of being a mudder... icon_confused.gif
    Like what actual benefit do u get from mudding? is it good for your skin? is it good for grindr pics? what?

  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    May 10, 2014 1:49 PM GMT
    This is hilarious because people that do these things are just bankers and office workers who never have to do any physical work so they try to play in the mud and get a bowel obstruction, lmao. Try farming, it's like doing a tough mudder 80 hours a week.