Which body parts to work out together and how often (allowing healing time) Monday - Friday.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 9:12 AM GMT
    I have recently started working out, and already came across a fairly obvious, yet overlooked problem.

    If I work my arms out on Monday, but should leave them for around a week to heal, I am then unable to work my shoulders/back. - Because these movements rely heavily on arm movements.

    So, I ask - Which body parts should be worked out together and when?

    Monday -
    Arms: Biceps, Triceps
    Shoulders
    Back

    Wednesday -
    Legs

    ...etc?

    Can someone give me a Monday - Sunday example?
    I should most likely say too, that I am really only bothered in upper body work. Shoulders, back, arms, pecs..

    Also, is it actually true that you should leave your arms a week to heal?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 10:19 AM GMT
    try this:

    monday - chest and triceps
    tuesday - biceps and back
    wednesday - legs and shoulders

    when you workout your chest, the triceps get used quite a bit. doing back exercises uses a lot of bicep power.

  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    May 03, 2014 11:35 AM GMT
    this is part of my cycle:

    Sunday - Chest/Back
    Monday - Shoulders/Biceps/Triceps
    Tuesday - Quads/Hams/Calves/Forearms
    Thursday - Full Body, with a focus on anything I feel I was too light on.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 12:12 PM GMT
    for me I work:
    1. Sunday is legs and abs.
    2. Monday is shoulders, chest, triceps and abs.
    3. Tuesday is off day.
    4. Wednesday is back, biceps and abs.
    5. Thursday is chest, shoulders, triceps and abs.
    6. Friday is off day
    7. Saturday is off day.

    But this is just a typical week. I can and do make changes depending on my work schedule for the week.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 1:32 PM GMT
    Hit major muscle twice as much. a good example would be

    Monday - Chest / Back
    Tues - Legs/ Abs/ Lowerbody
    Weds - Arms / shoulders
    Thurs - rest
    Fri - Chest / Back
    Sat - Legs / Abs/ lower body
    Sun - Rest

    Also what is your fitness goal?
    makes a big difference in how you should workout
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 2:35 PM GMT
    Chest/Back
    Legs/Back
    Shoulders/Biceps/Triceps
    Repeat.

    Do not give any muscle a week to heal unless you initially have debilitating soreness.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 2:47 PM GMT
    These are GREAT responses!

    Would I be considered stupid if my fitness goal was 'To look good in a short sleeve t-shirt?'

    I want a good upper body. Noticeable biceps and pecs!
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    May 03, 2014 2:50 PM GMT
    Tom8521 saidThese are GREAT responses!

    Would I be considered stupid if my fitness goal was 'To look good in a short sleeve t-shirt?'

    I want a good upper body. Noticeable biceps and pecs!


    I think that's a great goal! Just don't exclude your lower body to the extent you start to look like you have chicken legs. Proportionality is hot. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2014 3:20 PM GMT
    field123 said
    Tom8521 saidThese are GREAT responses!

    Would I be considered stupid if my fitness goal was 'To look good in a short sleeve t-shirt?'

    I want a good upper body. Noticeable biceps and pecs!


    I think that's a great goal! Just don't exclude your lower body to the extent you start to look like you have chicken legs. Proportionality is hot. icon_smile.gif


    What he said. Also a good squat and deadlift increases your bench press. Which helps your pecs icon_smile.gif
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    May 03, 2014 3:44 PM GMT
    Workout the muscle group you like the most the first day and from there workout whatever is not sore that day.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    May 03, 2014 5:41 PM GMT
    Tom8521 said
    I should most likely say too, that I am really only bothered in upper body work. Shoulders, back, arms, pecs..


    Skipping leg day makes baby Jesus cry.

    Skipping the core compound lifts (including deadlifts and squats) and focusing on the showy muscles can look nice in the short term when you get your newbie gains, but you'll end up with an unbalanced physique. You'll also bottleneck your real gains (i.e., because of your weaker core and back and legs, your other lifts will suffer).

    Start a routine for beginners, like starting strength (http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Starting_Strength_Wiki).
  • str8hardbody9

    Posts: 1519

    May 03, 2014 6:07 PM GMT
    Monday:
    Shoulders & delts + cardio

    Tuesday:
    Legs & calves + abs

    Wed:
    OFF

    Thursday:
    Back & biceps + cardio

    Friday:
    Chest & triceps + abs

    Saturday:
    OFF --- I splurge I eat anything (In & Out Burger w/ fries, chinese food, cupcakes, ice cream & pizza)

    Sunday:
    Shoulders & biceps + cardio

    I do 2 days ON, one day OFF. It works perfectly well for me and my muscles are well rested. ! eat 6 small meals a day. Drink protein shake 2 or 3x a day. No meal after 8:00pm. I watched what I eat except SAT (my reward day). I try to sleep 8 hours a day. I try to take a 15 min nap everyday if I had a chance. I drink a cup of coffee & one scoop of Jack3D before working out. I grilled most of my food. I love fish, lean meat & chicken. I have a full body massage once a week. My favorite workout is doing SQUATS & LUNGES. I have a nice bubble butt!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 08, 2014 5:48 PM GMT
    Monday
    Chest, Triceps

    Tuesday
    Cardio, Legs , core

    Wednesday
    Back, shoulders,

    Thursday
    Biceps, Cardio, Core

    Friday
    I mainly focus on Chest, and Legs on friday since they have rested 48-72 hours. I do not do a full chest or leg workout on friday but I do about three different exercises for each, with moderate weight.

    Weekend
    I take weekends off but if I do go to the gym I just go to play basketball.



    I like this schedule because every body part gets a chance to rest. I do not believe you need a whole week to rest, unless your body is actually sore. My body usually recovers after 48 hours.


    Hope this helps.
  • cowboyathlete

    Posts: 1346

    May 09, 2014 4:48 AM GMT
    I do arms on Monday, chest, shoulders, and back on Wednesday, and legs on Friday. I go cycling at least one day a week in there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 09, 2014 11:42 AM GMT
    jocks_and_socks saidtry this:

    monday - chest and triceps
    tuesday - biceps and back
    wednesday - legs and shoulders

    when you workout your chest, the triceps get used quite a bit. doing back exercises uses a lot of bicep power.



    That's eerie you have listed my current workout plan...
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    May 11, 2014 3:44 PM GMT
    Tom8521 saidI have recently started working out, and already came across a fairly obvious, yet overlooked problem.

    If I work my arms out on Monday, but should leave them for around a week to heal, I am then unable to work my shoulders/back. - Because these movements rely heavily on arm movements.

    So, I ask - Which body parts should be worked out together and when?

    Monday -
    Arms: Biceps, Triceps
    Shoulders
    Back

    Wednesday -
    Legs

    ...etc?

    Can someone give me a Monday - Sunday example?
    I should most likely say too, that I am really only bothered in upper body work. Shoulders, back, arms, pecs..

    Also, is it actually true that you should leave your arms a week to heal?


    Rather than give you a training split to blindly follow, I think it would be more beneficial if I gave you a guideline so you can mix and match muscle groups however you like. You might wanna change your training split a little, by the week.

    Biceps assist with back exercises, so never biceps before back. Otherwise your biceps will tire out before your back muscles (lats, traps, rhomboids, etc), and you won't be able to do an effective back workout. You can work out your biceps on the same day as back, but afterwards. Biceps can be isolated (no other muscle assists with biceps), so you don't have to worry about tiring another muscle before biceps. (Actually, you do: forearms)

    ^^ So take this principle, and here you go:

    Pulling muscles:

    Back --> Biceps --> Forearms

    That is, never forearms before biceps, and never forearms/biceps before back.

    Pushing muscles:

    Chest --> Shoulders --> Triceps

    Pretty straight forward.

    You can work the triceps on the same day as chest (after chest exercizes). Or you can workout triceps the next day. Triceps will be more refreshed if they have their own day, but you can argue that if you do them on chest day, then the chest exercises are a part of their workout. Some say it would be better to work chest and tri's separately if you really wanna make your tri's grow (and that's been my experience), but you might respond well even by doing triceps on chest day (but after chest). You can even do both, and change it up by week. You can apply the same principle to biceps/back. I sometimes do biceps on back day (after back exercises are done), or on separate days as back. If I do biceps on back day, it'll be high volume, light weights (since they're already exhausted from assisting in the back exercises). If I do biceps on a separate day, then I'll go heavier on biceps.

    You can also do opposing muscle groups together. You can do a chest and biceps day, for example, or a shoulder and biceps day, or a triceps and biceps day, or a chest and back day. These are opposite pairings, and do not affect each other.

    Here's some example training splits:

    Day 1: chest
    Day 2: shoulders
    Day 3: triceps
    Day 4: back
    day 5: biceps

    or:

    Day 1: chest and triceps
    Day 2: back and biceps
    Day 3: shoulders
    Day 4: cardio day? rest day? just NOT chest, since you did shoulders the day prior

    or:

    Day 1: back
    Day 2: chest and biceps
    Day 3: shoulders, then triceps

    All these example training splits follow the principles I outlined.

    Here's a more complicated training split, that follows the same principles. I've been doing this one this week:

    Day 1: Back (heavy, then light), then light biceps
    Day 2: heavy chest press movements, followed by light chest isolation movements (like flyes)
    Day 3: heavy shoulder press movements, followed by light tricep isolation and light delt isolation movements
    Day 4: Back (heavy, then light)
    Day 5: heavy close-grip bench press (taxing on the triceps), then light supersets of chest isolation followed by chest presses (because my triceps are exhausted, I'm supplementing by press movements -where triceps assist- with isolation work where I continue to work the chest after the triceps are too tired to continue), followed by heavy-to-medium biceps
    Day 6: light shoulder presses, heavy dips presses for triceps, light shoulders isolation, light triceps isolation

    Days 5 and 6, some might say I'm violating my prioritizing principles, but there's a logic to my madness: the close-grip presses, although taxing on the triceps, are still presses where chest gets a workout. The following day is a light shoulders day, not a heavy shoulders day, so it's fine.


    Now, let's talk legs:

    If you need to do serious work on your legs, then give them their own day.

    Some guys do some squats or deadlifts on chest or back day, and they'll do them first, before chest or back.

    Personally, my legs grow easy, and I only do a few sets of squats about once a week just to maintain size and strength. I'll attach them to maybe shoulders or back day, and I won't do them first. Since I'm trying to bring up my back width and I don't want to spend all my energy on squats when I should REALLY be working on my lagging back, I might do (on back day):

    heavy back exercises
    then, a few sets of squats
    then move on to light / high volume back exercises

    Last but not least:

    abs. These can be performed on any day, but always do them last, at the end of the workout. Never first, never during. Always last. You'll see guys at the gym do abs first or during, or supersetting abs with something else, like bicep curls. Wrong, wrong, wrong. The "assisting muscle" principle applies...abs stabilize your body during so many exercises, so you don't want to tire them out before doing heavier, harder things. So, always do abs last.

    As for how long to rest?

    This one is controversial. I have my own science to it. But generally, 72 hours rest for the big muscle groups (chest , back, legs), 48 hours rest for direct work on the smaller groups (tris, bis). Some say you can do abs everyday, others say they should rest. I'm in the "let abs rest" camp, and that rest is 48 hours (so, every other day at most).

    Cheers

    UFJocknerd said
    Tom8521 said
    I should most likely say too, that I am really only bothered in upper body work. Shoulders, back, arms, pecs..


    Skipping leg day makes baby Jesus cry.

    Skipping the core compound lifts (including deadlifts and squats) and focusing on the showy muscles can look nice in the short term when you get your newbie gains, but you'll end up with an unbalanced physique. You'll also bottleneck your real gains (i.e., because of your weaker core and back and legs, your other lifts will suffer).

    Start a routine for beginners, like starting strength (http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Starting_Strength_Wiki).


    ^^ Yep. Very important advice.