Nuclear Missile Silos use safe secure 8" floppies

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    May 11, 2014 2:05 AM GMT
    ever so safe & secure

    http://tech.slashdot.org/story/14/04/29/1256250/us-nuclear-missile-silos-use-safe-secure-8-floppy-disks
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    May 11, 2014 2:08 AM GMT
    Can you still spread a virus using these floppies? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    May 11, 2014 2:56 AM GMT
    th3ro saidCan you still spread a virus using these floppies? icon_rolleyes.gif


    Yes!
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    May 11, 2014 4:35 AM GMT
    Hugos house of horrors plox
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    May 11, 2014 9:37 AM GMT
    Military contracts are incredibly byzantine. When I was in the Navy back in the 70s I worked on aviation electronics. Some of it was state of the art for the time with integrated circuits, but we still had stuff using vacuum tubes.

    By the time something is designed and finally makes it through the laborious approval process, it's already obsolete.

    And the contract is usually awarded to some friend of some congressperson, not to the company that's best at making that kind of stuff. So you could get someone who's been making screws, nuts, and bolts getting awarded a contract for making an airplane's navigation system.
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    May 11, 2014 10:59 AM GMT
    I'll bet the Russian ICBM force can only dream of such technology. They probably still have to wait for the valves to heat up.
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    May 11, 2014 2:34 PM GMT
    I remember when a Soviet air force pilot defected to the West and flew there in a MIG. When they inspected his plane they were amazed at how out of date everything was.
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    May 11, 2014 3:58 PM GMT
    Hehehe

    "8 inch Floppy" icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 11, 2014 6:46 PM GMT
    Medium itself is not safe or secure. Only the controls and countermeasures in place determine the residual risk.
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    May 11, 2014 10:23 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidMedium itself is not safe or secure. Only the controls and countermeasures in place determine the residual risk.


    Unless you're new to computers, you'd probably also know that floppies carry far less data, and as a medium they do carry more risk given how vulnerable they are to being corrupted.

    If it's on 8" floppies it is also likely that they carry considerably less data than your average usb stick which means that the level of encryption is probably a lot more primative because of that capacity. icon_wink.gif
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    May 12, 2014 1:28 PM GMT
    GAMRican said ... the controls and countermeasures in place determine the residual risk.


    to quote some Reagan era music:
    hope the personnel in charge "loves their children" and none of this blows up.
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    May 12, 2014 10:12 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidMilitary contracts are incredibly byzantine. When I was in the Navy back in the 70s I worked on aviation electronics. Some of it was state of the art for the time with integrated circuits, but we still had stuff using vacuum tubes.

    By the time something is designed and finally makes it through the laborious approval process, it's already obsolete.

    And the contract is usually awarded to some friend of some congressperson, not to the company that's best at making that kind of stuff. So you could get someone who's been making screws, nuts, and bolts getting awarded a contract for making an airplane's navigation system.


    Very accurate. Our technology for communications is still very old. (This is my job.) Much of the equipment and electronics that we train with is Vietnam war era technology. Noted, that most of it has been upgraded and developed. It still is several years (decades) old.