Career Philosophy: Is It Irresponsible/Wrong to Not Pursue a Certain Career?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 13, 2014 6:32 AM GMT
    So something about careers I've been thinking about.

    Suppose you were a smart individual. You're extremely good at something, let's say maybe math, or science, or foreign languages. And those abilities would lend you to potentially be someone doing something absolutely vital to society, like become a doctor or nurse. Granted that many people could not pursue that kind of career because they aren't necessarily fit for that field. But if you were, and you decided to do something else that made you happy, would it be irresponsible or wrong to do so? The world really needs more doctors and nurses, so if you're cut out for it, should you be belittled or criticized for not pursuing it? The utilitarian school would say yes because you're not bringing about the greatest good which benefits the most people.

    What's your opinion?
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    May 13, 2014 7:19 AM GMT
    I don't think it is. I'm studying to be a musician and I'm trying to use emergency medicine to support my career down the road, which is kind of the opposite of what you've illustrated.

    If you get an education in medicine and you'd rather be a stripper good for you!

    My cousin is a metallurgist. His biggest passion and only source of income is bartending. And he's damn good at it. Probably because he's good at remembering ratios.
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    May 13, 2014 7:32 AM GMT
    how can people know what is genuinely most valuable to society in a specific case rather than in a vague general sense? It´s impossible to calculate and therefore you can´t criticize any individual.
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    May 13, 2014 7:26 PM GMT
    I did something I think was different but not irresponsible at all. I enlisted in the military a few years back when I was halfway through school. I had good grades and could've kept going but I chose to do something different. Everyone I knew, really freaked out when I told them I was enlisting, instead of finishing up my degree. I'm glad I did it though - I don't have any regrets on what I did. I felt like it was for me, and I went ahead and did my time.

    I'm getting out in a month, and am transferring to a better school. I will be finishing up my undergrad next year. It will be nice to be able to continue my education once again, but I did take a rather slight detour through my education to get where I am now. Who knows, maybe I might try something out different in a few years down the road. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    May 13, 2014 8:20 PM GMT
    People should take more responsibility of their own health.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    May 13, 2014 8:45 PM GMT
    judgingyou saidDo what you love.
    If you would make a totally amazing doctor it doesn't fucking matter if you don't love the job.
    Who gives a shit if it's irresponsible or whatever, it's YOUR life.


    This ^
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    May 14, 2014 1:22 AM GMT
    Just because you're good at something doesn't mean you have to do it for a living. I'm good at cutting pineapples. When they see me cutting one, some of my relatives tell me I should be a caterer. Because I'm good at cutting pineapples. Don't listen to every dumb idea that comes your way.

    Most of us are good at many things. This gives us the freedom to choose a career that both makes the world a better place (if that matters to you) and makes us happy.

    There's an old saying: "Find a job you love, and you'll never work a day in your life." If you do that, not only will you be happy, but also you will be more effective.
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    May 14, 2014 2:03 AM GMT
    if ur heart is not in medicine, your going to make a carp doctor, or at the very most, a mediocre one. regardless to the fact that you may have the intellectual ability to excel in that path. so fuckit, the world can do with a bit less mediocrity. go find something you are interested in, and it would be a better contribution to this over populated world.
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    May 14, 2014 2:06 AM GMT
    amen to this:

    shortbutsweet saidMost of us are good at many things. This gives us the freedom to choose a career that both makes the world a better place (if that matters to you) and makes us happy.



    and more amen:

    shortbutsweet saidThere's an old saying: "Find a job you love, and you'll never work a day in your life." If you do that, not only will you be happy, but also you will be more effective.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2014 2:06 AM GMT
    Just be good at everything. It's easier.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 14, 2014 5:12 AM GMT
    Goodness.
    Why be miserable your entire working life, in a career that you'd rather not have, just because more people are needed in that type of career ?

    Try to find a combination of a career that you like, and that pays a lot of money.
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    May 14, 2014 5:48 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidTry to find a combination of a career that you like, and that pays a lot of money.

    Not always so easy.

    I see it as a sliding scale; at one end of the scale is where you really hate the work. That's a career you probably should avoid, even if it pays well.

    At the other end may be something that you love doing but the pay is mediocre and you'll never be able to buy your own home and won't be able to retire until you're 70.

    Should you go with the latter? It's a tough call.

    And I don't see the issue as being about choosing a career because it's socially responsible. You can choose a career you like and do well at and on your own time do volunteer work for socially responsible organizations.
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    May 15, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    ^^^ That's probably true. Your career doesn't necessarily have to be the outlet for your ambition to change the world.

    However, since you spend at least 40 hours each week at work, what you do for a living should be consistent with your values.