when do you turn on your air conditioner? and what's it set at?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 5:33 AM GMT
    I turn mine on when the temperature inside gets to 85 or above. It's set to cool it down to 77. Today was the first day I had to use it this year. It was 90 outside.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 6:07 AM GMT
    Never.

    I did something like this:
    earth_tubes_infographic-930x375.jpg

    But completely passive. Not engineered, I just layed some drain pipe in to the basement while the utility trenches were open. And added some vents at the top of the house. It's not quite big enough to cool the upper floor when the temperature goes over 90. Works fine downstairs. I may fool around with a solar chimney to draw more air out of the top of the house. And rig a halyard so that I can hoist the old sails from my boat to shade the west side of the house on summer afternoons.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 6:20 AM GMT
    Nice. Sucking the warm air from the top should help. I need something to suck the hot air out of my attic. It gets blazing hot up there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 6:29 AM GMT
    this is too complicated:
    mindgarden said
    earth_tubes_infographic-930x375.jpg




    i bought an evaporation cooler from homeDepot. Single story ranch so cut holes in the ceiling to the attic to vent out the air flow. Cools both the livable area and the attic.

    op's question:
    cooler (on lo speed) is set at 72F, on a hot day it turns on about noon. 100F days are possible here.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 6:45 AM GMT
    You can get an attic fan with a built-in thermostat from Home Depot. I had one set at 100° in the peak of the garage. But it hasn't come on since I insulated the garage. i.e. those fans need to be above the insulation.

    I suspect that a passive solar chimney could be pretty effective. When I was installing the main drain stacks, I had just a few feet of black ABS pipe sticking up in the sun, and it was sucking air at the open end (down in the house) like crazy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 9:05 AM GMT
    Supposed to be below freezing here tonight and the next 2 nights. More worried about frost and snow than air conditioning at this point. icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 2:23 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidNice. Sucking the warm air from the top should help. I need something to suck the hot air out of my attic. It gets blazing hot up there.

    Years ago my parents had a summer heat problem in the unfinished part of their attic. Since they used that area for some storage they were worried about heat damage to some items. Plus if you went up there to get something you could only stay a few moments from the heat, like a sauna.

    So they installed a large exhaust fan in a wall, with automatic shutters against the rain. It was the kind you see in warehouses and some other commercial buildings, about 3 feet in diameter and driven by a rubber belt from the electric motor. They had a weather-shielded and screened window installed at the other end of the attic for cross ventilation. The fan wasn't temperature activated, but had a 2-speed wall switch in the downstairs living area.

    It worked really well, the attic tolerable for once. And in summer nights, when it was cool outside, we'd open the door to the attic to create a lovely fresh breeze through the house by opening windows, no need to run the air conditioning. And year-round, whenever kitchen smoke or smell would start to permeate the rest of the house, more than the kitchen fan could handle, that big exhaust fan would clear the air almost instantly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 2:35 PM GMT
    Mine came on weeks ago .. when I am not home it is set on 80.. when I am home its on 75 and then its still warm so I strip down to just shorts or underwear.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 2:41 PM GMT
    what was the question...


    shorts or underwear?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 4:06 PM GMT
    An excellent point: Don't waste energy, just take off more clothes!

    Oh wait... I wasn't wearing any to begin with... icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 4:09 PM GMT
    We don't need air conditioners here ...

    r-SOUTHERN-ALBERTA-SNOW-large570.jpg?12
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 4:13 PM GMT
    When it's just me in the house it stays on 72 degrees. When my 17 year old dog is in the house I have to lower it to 69 degrees because he has a heart condition that makes him get hot easily.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2014 4:34 PM GMT
    I'm from Miami but it swelters here in New York in the summer. You should see my electric bill.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2014 9:31 PM GMT


    21 - 16 degree Celsius.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2014 10:06 PM GMT
    owl_bundy saidi have no air conditioner. icon_cry.gif
    Me either i just open a window icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2014 10:24 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Art_Deco said
    Years ago my parents had a summer heat problem in the unfinished part of their attic. Since they used that area for some storage they were worried about heat damage to some items. Plus if you went up there to get something you could only stay a few moments from the heat, like a sauna.

    So they installed a large exhaust fan in a wall, with automatic shutters against the rain. It was the kind you see in warehouses and some other commercial buildings, about 3 feet in diameter and driven by a rubber belt from the electric motor. They had a weather-shielded and screened window installed at the other end of the attic for cross ventilation. The fan wasn't temperature activated, but had a 2-speed wall switch in the downstairs living area.

    It worked really well, the attic tolerable for once. And in summer nights, when it was cool outside, we'd open the door to the attic to create a lovely fresh breeze through the house by opening windows, no need to run the air conditioning. And year-round, whenever kitchen smoke or smell would start to permeate the rest of the house, more than the kitchen fan could handle, that big exhaust fan would clear the air almost instantly.

    We had the same thing in the house I grew up in! Was really nice during summer evenings to just turn on the fan and feel the nice breeze as it drew the air through the house.

    And where was this? My family home was just west of Manhattan, NYC.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 2:19 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidI turn mine on when the temperature inside gets to 85 or above. It's set to cool it down to 77. Today was the first day I had to use it this year. It was 90 outside.


    77° F is where I keep our thermostat year round. In South Florida the A/C is on nearly 365. On the few cold evenings I'll turn the A/C off and open the windows, but the A/C comes on again during the day.

    There are fewer and fewer of those cold nights anymore. But I can't state that without dispute from our Republicans here, who insist global warming is a liberal hoax, per Rush Limbaugh.

    Or else it's caused by sunspots, or some other natural process none of them can identify. But not by greenhouse gases created by humans, which our own US Senator Marco Rubio, that distinguished climatologist, has recently proven to be false.

    So anyway, our A/C runs a lot more now, as shown by our electric bill. icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 2:29 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Oh, about 35 miles or so west of NYC, up in the hills of NW NJ. Maybe these attic fans are a "Jersey thing!"

    No, we had the same thing out in the countryside outside Detroit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 2:35 AM GMT
    Uhhh when it's hot!

    Duh.gif

    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 3:54 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidNever.

    I did something like this:
    < img src="http://www.ercshowcase.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/earth_tubes_infographic-930x375.jpg">

    But completely passive. Not engineered, I just layed some drain pipe in to the basement while the utility trenches were open. And added some vents at the top of the house. It's not quite big enough to cool the upper floor when the temperature goes over 90. Works fine downstairs. I may fool around with a solar chimney to draw more air out of the top of the house. And rig a halyard so that I can hoist the old sails from my boat to shade the west side of the house on summer afternoons.

    This is interesting. Is this a passive system? I've only seen geothermal heat exchanges that utilize some type of forced air system.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 4:15 AM GMT
    Right now my thermostat is at 68 right now. Too hot and dry in San Diego now! Really hoping it cools down soon here...icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 6:03 AM GMT
    xrichx said
    mindgarden saidNever.

    I did something like this:
    < img src="http://www.ercshowcase.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/earth_tubes_infographic-930x375.jpg">

    But completely passive. Not engineered, I just layed some drain pipe in to the basement while the utility trenches were open. And added some vents at the top of the house. It's not quite big enough to cool the upper floor when the temperature goes over 90. Works fine downstairs. I may fool around with a solar chimney to draw more air out of the top of the house. And rig a halyard so that I can hoist the old sails from my boat to shade the west side of the house on summer afternoons.

    This is interesting. Is this a passive system? I've only seen geothermal heat exchanges that utilize some type of forced air system.


    It's supposed to be passive, but mine isn't really big enough to work passively for this sized house. Hence the prospective solar chimneys. Which will force air, but still be silent and passive. If they work.

    Note that the system does work well in my laboratory, which is only about 800 square feet, in a separate building. But there is a lot of old lab equipment in there generating excess heat. One 12-inch drain pipe, 8-feet underground, about 100 feet long for the cool air intake. (The main house has two. Should probably have eight.) One attic fan in the plenum space, set to come on at 100 °F. The fan might be replaced by a silent solar chimney, if I can figure out a design that works but doesn't look ugly.

    The air intakes are all on the roof of the wood shed, joining up inside an old broken swamp cooler. I ran it a few times, but it causes condensation in the system. Improving that could be another project, some day. But, you know, in our climate we only need cooling about two weeks of the year anyway. (For the time being.) Low priority.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 7:03 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    I love the Pacific Northwest for a lot of reasons.


    OK, off topic here, but you had me talking about this just now. However, I'm trying to figure out what's exactly is there to love so much about that area? Not hating, but when I was there I just felt so friggin far away from the world lol. I guess because I'm from South Florida originally, and Seattle is like the farthest possible extreme, distance-wise.

    I guess if I had roots in California, it wouldn't be a big deal. But I just felt Seattle is was too 'out there'. You have Vancouver, but it's hard to get into Canada these days. So, you basically have San Francisco, Portland, or Salt Lake City as possible options, all which are millions of miles away.

    Oh, I keep my a/c at 68-75 depending on how I feel. Anything above 75 degrees, you are just wasting your money because it's still hot as fuck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 16, 2014 7:04 AM GMT
    crazyrunnerguy saidRight now my thermostat is at 68 right now. Too hot and dry in San Diego now! Really hoping it cools down soon here...icon_confused.gif


    All the fires here are freaking me out. Today was my last day of grad school and as I walked to the campus parking lot I saw the plumes of smoke from the north....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 17, 2014 4:50 AM GMT
    I'm not a big fan (get it?) of air conditioning in general. I rarely turn it on in my car unless I am driving too fast to open the windows. I use it sparingly as a concession to customers at work. Wild horses couldn't drag me into the produce section at Costco.

    But here in South Florida, AC is a necessity, not an option. If you don't remove the humidity from the air, mold will consume everything you own in short order. The first thing to go will be leather goods, so say goodbye to your shoes, boots, belts, leather jackets, gloves, etc.

    I keep it set for 80 degrees. Just enough to discourage the mold without making me feel like I live in a bubble.