Folding Bike

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2014 5:08 PM GMT
    Looking at getting a folding bike. Hung up on whether getting a 7 speed or 18 speed. Why should I get the 18 speed over the 7?
    FLASH_1024x1024.jpg?v=1378161477

    7 Speed
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    May 14, 2014 5:51 PM GMT
    Depends on the riding you'll be doing, and the terrain. More gears could help on hilly terrain, and for going fast. Though honestly I wouldn't want to try going fast on a folding bike, with it's smaller wheels and compact geometry.

    The one with the fenders & rack seems more the urban bike, and does it have a rear suspension? 7 speeds may be adequate on city streets.
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    May 14, 2014 8:15 PM GMT
    Fixed.

    FLASH_1024x1024.jpg?v=1378161477


    P10207731_1024x1024.jpg?v=1366084983

    What's your reason for getting one that folds? Space issues where you work or live? I always wonder how well built and reliable they are. I'm sticking to the traditional bikes.
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    May 14, 2014 8:30 PM GMT
    eb925guy saidFixed.


    What's your reason for getting one that folds? Space issues where you work or live? I always wonder how well built and reliable they are. I'm sticking to the traditional bikes.


    bOTH, SPACE AT HOME AND WORK. don't want to leave outside tied to a pole, ain't no lock that will stop a NYC thief.

    Thanks for the coding suggestion. applied to original image. :-)icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 14, 2014 8:47 PM GMT
    ayer2009 said
    eb925guy saidFixed.


    What's your reason for getting one that folds? Space issues where you work or live? I always wonder how well built and reliable they are. I'm sticking to the traditional bikes.


    bOTH, SPACE AT HOME AND WORK. don't want to leave outside tied to a pole, ain't no lock that will stop a NYC thief.

    Thanks for the coding suggestion. applied to original image. :-)icon_biggrin.gif

    If an NYC commuting bike I'd say get the one with the fenders, keep your clothes cleaner. Can also put a carry bag or briefcase on the rear rack. And 7 speeds is enough for New York streets & speeds.
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    May 14, 2014 9:56 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    ayer2009 said
    eb925guy saidFixed.


    What's your reason for getting one that folds? Space issues where you work or live? I always wonder how well built and reliable they are. I'm sticking to the traditional bikes.


    bOTH, SPACE AT HOME AND WORK. don't want to leave outside tied to a pole, ain't no lock that will stop a NYC thief.

    Thanks for the coding suggestion. applied to original image. :-)icon_biggrin.gif

    If an NYC commuting bike I'd say get the one with the fenders, keep your clothes cleaner. Can also put a carry bag or briefcase on the rear rack. And 7 speeds is enough for New York streets & speeds.


    Also, a price variance of $239 or $559 that's $330
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2014 10:45 PM GMT
    ayer2009 said
    Art_Deco said
    ayer2009 said
    eb925guy saidFixed.


    What's your reason for getting one that folds? Space issues where you work or live? I always wonder how well built and reliable they are. I'm sticking to the traditional bikes.


    bOTH, SPACE AT HOME AND WORK. don't want to leave outside tied to a pole, ain't no lock that will stop a NYC thief.

    Thanks for the coding suggestion. applied to original image. :-)icon_biggrin.gif

    If an NYC commuting bike I'd say get the one with the fenders, keep your clothes cleaner. Can also put a carry bag or briefcase on the rear rack. And 7 speeds is enough for New York streets & speeds.


    Also, a price variance of $239 or $559 that's $330

    If you get a basket for the front you'll have a place to put your dog! LOL Sorry, couldn't resist. For an extra $330 you'd better have some pretty steep hills to climb to make the extra gears worthwhile!
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    May 19, 2014 3:28 PM GMT
    The comments above are right on about the gear selection. But you should look at all of the components. At $240, you're not going to get much. Either the components or the frame, (or both) are going to be junk. The Achille's heels of that style folder are the seat and stem posts. Depending on how much you weigh, they're going to flex. A lot. You don't want to skimp there. Adding a suspension link to a flexy bike like that just seems stupid. I'd stay away from that bike. You can add fenders and a rack to any bike.

    The company that I bought mine from sets these folders up for all sorts of riding - from racing to touring. The ones intended for commuting are generally the smallest and lightest. I bought one for touring (It fits into a suitcase for air travel. Or the sail locker of my boat. Or the trunk of my little beemer.) So it has three gear ranges. But when riding it around town, I just keep it on the center chainring.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 19, 2014 3:37 PM GMT
    In hilly/mountainous areas, the 18 speed will be more practical.

    In flat areas, the 7 speed.

    If you're going to use it for daily commute, spend the extra $ and get a good one so it'll last longer.
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    May 20, 2014 3:49 AM GMT
    Be careful. I've ridden 6 folding bikes for over 25 years including this one so you can benefit from my mistakes:

    You'll have stability problems at high speeds, attempting to jump even a low curb and over rough surfaces because:

    1. They make folding bikes to be unisex which means the normal crossbar for a male is to low making a man prone to falling sideways. If you can ride a girls bike with no problem, you'll be OK.

    2. Smaller tires mean a rougher, less stable ride.

    3. The fold joint, handle bars and seat lower or loosen as you ride.

    4. Steering with small wheels is much more sensitive than larger wheels.

    5. Smaller wheels damage easier.

    6. On this model, the chain is dangerously low to the ground.

    7. Instability is greater increased if you don't sit the entire time the bike is moving.

    Please wear a helmet. The staff at many emergency rooms have a nice phrase for these types of bikes: Donor cycles

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    May 20, 2014 3:57 AM GMT
    ^^
    I'll just get a razor scooter now..

    I liked this idea but, yes no... I'd rather just buy another road bike than the aforementioned nonsense
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    May 20, 2014 5:32 AM GMT
    I bought a Dahon Uno last year. Got LOTS of attention on the train when it was folded. Definitely a conversation starter.

    It was the only folding bike that didn't look like a clown bike. I didn't need a multi-speed. Most of my commute is flat. So single speed was perfect. My only dislike.. coaster brake. I don't understand why these things are still in existence. They're kinda dangerous when you're going fast, and your foot slips and you accidentally pedal back. Also, they tend to lock/brake the wheel quickly if you back pedal too hard. So annoying.

    I need to find a bike shop that will switch out the hub with a freewheel. Then install either a caliper or disc brake. Then it will be perfect! icon_cool.gif

    (not my pic)

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  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    May 20, 2014 6:28 AM GMT
    mx5guynj saidBe careful. I've ridden 6 folding bikes for over 25 years including this one so you can benefit from my mistakes:

    You'll have stability problems at high speeds, attempting to jump even a low curb and over rough surfaces because:

    1. They make folding bikes to be unisex which means the normal crossbar for a male is to low making a man prone to falling sideways. If you can ride a girls bike with no problem, you'll be OK.

    2. Smaller tires mean a rougher, less stable ride.

    3. The fold joint, handle bars and seat lower or loosen as you ride.

    4. Steering with small wheels is much more sensitive than larger wheels.

    5. Smaller wheels damage easier.

    6. On this model, the chain is dangerously low to the ground.

    7. Instability is greater increased if you don't sit the entire time the bike is moving.

    Please wear a helmet. The staff at many emergency rooms have a nice phrase for these types of bikes: Donor cycles


    You can buy folding bikes with full size wheels. They aren't as small when folded but are still better for storage than a non folding.